Tag: book culture

Reading Rainbow Host Reads To Get Us Through COVID-19

Getting involved in the livestreams are perfect if you're learning how to homeschool your kids for the first time or if your kids are getting on your nerves a little bit too much, turn it on and go have quality 'you' time.

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Book Sales Climb as Readers Seek To Escape

COVID-19 continues to sweep the globe, and book sales are climbing as a result. Readers seek to escape the uncertain world and distract themselves through all forms of literature. Citizens in the United Kingdom are gathering novels, puzzle books, study guides, and coloring books as they prepare for long periods of social isolation. Fiction sales are up by a third and children’s books rise 234%, while stores like Waterstones are seeing a 400% weekly rise of online sales.

image via bbc news

 

 

It’s not just genres that seem to be on the rise, classic titles like The Great Gatsby, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and The Bell Jar are getting their fair share of reads this month. Authors are doing their part, too. Many are making efforts to help their readers pass the time. Some are reading their books to their audience on social media platforms and generating stay-at-home PSAs, while others are allowing easier distribution of their titles for everyone.

Featured image via financial times 

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Virtual Bookclubs to Join During Quarantine: Part 2

Sometimes, the best part about reading a book is the community around it. Book clubs have been a staple of reading books for near as long as the books themselves. Yet, in recent times of social distancing, it can feel much harder to connect into these larger populations of book readers. Many book clubs have had to cancel their in-person meetings, even as one of the few perks of quarantine is the increased ability to read. Thankfully, the literary community is an adaptable one. Many groups have already found ways to transition book clubs to a virtual affair and are eager to expand their conversations to anyone ready to join. Below, you can find just a few examples of book clubs already ready for a new, virtual reality. Check out part one here, if you haven’t already.

1. Los Angeles Times Book Club

Image result for los angeles times book club

image via la times

The Los Angeles Times Book Club is returning in a new virtual set-up. Their first meet-up will be on March 30th with authors Steph Cha and Joe Ide.

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Cha and Ide will be joined by Times reporter Maria L. LaGanga in a discussion about L.A. noir. The meet-up will be streamed live on the L.A. Times Facebook page and on YouTube, starting at 7 p.m. Monday.

2. The Guardian’s Reading Group

On the first Tuesday of every month, a theme or author is put to a public vote by the Guardian. The book is then chosen by the outcome of these votes. Sam Jordison, a well-known reader and publisher,  then hosts an online discussion every Tuesday where he explains the book’s history, researches any questions the audience asks and, potentially even, arranges live chats with the author.

 

3. sILENT bOOK cLUB

Image result for silent book club

image via silent book club

This may or may not have been in part one, too. You can’t blame us, we’re big fans. In 2012, Laura Gluhanich and Guinevere de la Mare founded this book club as a potential outlet for introverts. The club has been succeeding wildly since, as it has grown to 260 chapters around the world in 31 countries. In a typical chapter meeting, members read whatever book they’ve brought for an hour silently. After, they share what they casually share what they learned. For now, they’ve gone virtual.

4. translated Fiction ONline Book CLub

This weekly Zoom series is run by six European publishing houses. The participating houses switch off presenting a book from their catalogs to their audience. Their first call is today, March 26. The Mussel Feast by Birgit Vanderbeke is being presented, a family drama set before the fall of the Berlin Wall.

5. Quarantine Book Club

Image result for quarantine book club

image via quarantine book club

The Quarantine Book Club has been using the increased time indoors to their full advantage. Every weekday since March 16, t, the club has hosted two Zoom talks each day with varying authors. Erika Hall and Mike Monteiro, two designers who live in San Francisco, founded the book club when their work opportunities dried up; their audience soon expanded beyond the circle of friends they’d imagined taking part in.

In an interview with TIME, Monteiro says, “People want human connection. They’re bored, they’re freaked out. So you get on here and you talk to somebody who’s really good in their field.”

Monteiro seems to be onto something. Hundreds of people have been paying the small admissions fees to listen to authors and ask them questions. The Quarantine Book Club plans to run twice a day for however long the quarantine lasts, with proceeds going to the authors as well as Monteiro and Hall’s design studio. The science fiction author and journalist Cory Doctorow will be featured on April 1.

 

Of course, beyond any of these options, there’s no better time to organize your own book club. Reach out to some book-loving friends and see what you can create! With a bit of ambition and a good wifi connection, just about any sort of book club can still be made possible.

feature image via book giving day

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Audible Makes Hundreds of Titles Free Amid Coronavirus Crisis

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to sweep the globe, millions of individuals and families are forced to remain at home in an effort to flatten the curve. Fulfilling work and school tasks at home is the new reality for most, and many are grappling with the new challenges of what it means to socially isolate during a global health crisis.

While many are trying to lessen the blow and support small businesses by purchasing take-out, delivery, and gift cards, some familiar media companies are doing their part to help make social isolation a little bit more bearable.

 

For your time at home with your families, Audible is offering hundreds of audiobooks for free. This comes in an effort to help parents with children home from school, and the company is hoping to assist in keeping families calm and entertained. The announcement of Audible’s new terms came with the promise that “For as long as schools are closed, we are open.”

 

image via audible

The vast array of titles is divided into six categories: Littlest Listeners, Elementary, Tween, Teen, Literary Classics and Folk & Fairy Tales for All. The audiobooks are available to stream on all devices.

In these rapidly changing times, it can be comforting to ground yourself in a story, new or old. Definitely check out all Audible has to offer.

 

 

featured image via microsoft 

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Hay Literary Festival CANCELLED

Adding to a string of cancelled events in light of the coronavirus pandemic, Wales’ annual Hay Literary Festival has been cancelled. Due to take place May 21-31, the festival relies on tickets and sales for 70% of income, and as a result, is now facing a significant threat to its existence. Director of the festival, Peter Florence, expressed his concerns surrounding this, in conversation with The Guardian.

As an organisation we now face a stark reality. We have ten days to raise the funds we need to support us in the coming months and secure Hay Festival 2021 and a time when we can again celebrate together and tell stories of these times

 

The town of Hay-on-Wye benefits greatly from the tourism aspect of the festival, as it brings in around 25m British pounds (approx 30m USD), to an otherwise low-paid area. Ticket holders for this year’s event will receive full refunds, though the organizers have set up a GoFundMe, and implore customers and the general public to offer what support they can in such an uncertain time.

Hay-on-Wye, lovingly dubbed The Town of Books, is the perfect locale for a literary festival. With over twenty bookshops, it is also considered the National Book Town of Wales.

Image result for hay on wye bookseller map

image via hay-on-wye

This year’s festival was due to have a line up of renowned authors, booksellers, and writers, the longlist of which included; Gloria Steinem, Ali Smith, Stephen Fry, and Hilary Mantel.

It’s clear that this will be a major loss for organizers, authors, residents of the village, and book lovers alike. With any luck, and support from those who can donate, the festival will be back with a bang in 2021.

feature image via hay festival

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