Tag: writing

Seven Words Shakespeare Invented

Did you know Shakespeare invented more than 1700 words? Probably. Maybe. There’s a bunch of controversy. Still, he definitely invented some words we use every day. You can probably find the long list if you really want, but here are seven. You may sense a theme.

 

 

1. Countless

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This is a pretty pedestrian word. Obviously Shakespeare didn’t invent the idea of counting, but he did give us a useful way to talk about it. It’s definitely faster than saying ‘without measure’.

 

2. Gloomy

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What would we do without the word gloomy? No synonym comes close. Dark? Shadowy? Get out of here. In this, the gloomiest season, it’s only right we honor the word itself.

 

 

3. Critic

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Where would we be without critics? How would we know what super hero movies are actually worth the trouble? In 2019, it’s hard, and I say that as a fan.

 

 

4. Bloody

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Another one that’s hella seasonably appropriate. Another one where there are no good synonyms, though I feel like if you want to convey it there are some fun gothic options.

 

 

5. Pious

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This one’s got ‘devout’ but pious does have a different vibe, maybe more smugness? Whatever it is, you can never have too many synonyms. Words, words, words.

 

 

6. Lonely

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Whatever would we do without lonely? Loneliness, lonesome, just a lot of feeling in a small space. Shakespeare knew what was up, though it doesn’t seem like HE was ever alone.

 

 

7. Majestic

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Majestic is a great word, for both serious and ironic usage (a lot of the images I found were derpy lions and unlikely centaurs). It conveys something ‘great’ just doesn’t.

 

 

 

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Quiz – Which Troubled Bird Are You?

The Mincing Mockingbird’s Guide to Troubled Birds is one of the most amazing and inexplicable thing I’ve ever read. Those birds have been through some stuff. Which one are you?

 

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‘The Stand’ TV Series Casts Whoopi Goldberg, Alexander Skarsgard, And More!

Get hype, Stephen King fans! The Stand, an upcoming adaptation of Stephen King’s bestselling novel, has added more cast members to the epic post-apocalyptic series. Exclusive to CBS All Access, it was announced via Deadline that Whoopi Goldberg, Jovan Adepo, Owen Teague, Brad William Henke, and Daniel Junjata. And most exciting of all, Alexander Skarsgard will play Randall Flagg.

 

image via Stephen King wiki

 

Written by Josh Boone and Ben Cavell, the book tells of a plague ravaging mankind and leaving behind the remnants of humanity. A long novel, the epic details the struggle for the survival of humanity between the frail but wise Mother Abigail and  the evil, satanic Randall Flagg. The book has dozens of character viewpoints but it all comes down to a confrontation between the two opposing forces, with Mother Abigail receiving messages from God to aid her followers.

Whoopi Goldberg has been announced to play Mother Abigail. Adepo will play Larry Underwood, a young musician with a taste for fame and Henke will play Tom Cullen, a mentally challenged man with a sweet soul.

The series will be produced by CBS Television Studios. Josh Boone and Ben Cavell will write and executive produce, with Boone also directing. Roy Lee, Jimmy Miller and Richard P. Rubinstein will also serve as executive producers with Will Weiske serving as co-executive producer. Knate Lee, Jill Killington and Owen King will serve as producers.

Most exciting of all, Stephen King will write the last chapter of the series, providing a new coda that isn’t found in the book!

 

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This is an exciting development, showcasing a star studded cast to portray the many, multi-dimensional characters. We’re excited to see them brought to life, especially Randall Flagg, thought of as King’s ‘ubervillain’. The series will also have a hand from Stephen King himself, who will write the final episode of the series and provide a ‘coda’ that wasn’t there in the original novel.

We can’t wait to see King’s masterpiece coming to the small screen!

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Deadline

Our Favorite Tolkien & Lewis Apocrypha

Tolkien and Lewis were both in residence at Oxford for many years, studying and teaching both. They were also close friends, even though they disagreed on almost everything. Sure, they had a shared interest in language, and in what we now call fantasy, but they disagreed on religion, and on the tones of their books. There are also a lot of stories about their friendship, few confirmed, but all amazing. Here are our favorites!

 

1. The Lamppost

 

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There’s a story that says Lewis specifically put the lamppost in Narnia because Tolkien said a good fantasy story would never have one. The sheer pettiness. What an icon. No fantasy story would have a lamppost? Well this one does! Please, TELL Lewis what his story can have. There’s no slowing him down. A lesson in spite we should really all take to heart.

 

 

2. Religion

 

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Tolkien was, as well as being a linguist and historian, quite Catholic, and Lewis found his philosophical suggestions appealing, becoming religious himself. Tolkien didn’t get what he wanted, though, because though Lewis became more religious, he was Protestant, and Tolkien didn’t at all appreciate how much religion was in Lewis’ books. Kinda played himself.

 

3. The Draft

 

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Apparently when Lewis first read his draft of The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe to Tolkien and a croup of friends, Tolkien hated it. He thought it was terrible and combined too many mythologies. He wanted more consistent world building, and I don’t have a good source for this, but I’ve heard he even told Lewis to stop writing.

 

 

 

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Writers on Writing: Top 5 Craft Books by Famous Authors

5. Why I Write by George Orwell

 

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George Orwell outlines what he believes to be the four major motives for writing in Why I Write. They are sheer egoism, aesthetic enthusiasm, historical impulse, and political purpose. Orwell exemplifies all these traits in his own writing, and it is fascinating to see how he balances his passion for political reform with his artistic ambition.

“[T]he more one is conscious of one’s political bias, the more chance one has of acting politically without sacrificing one’s aesthetic and intellectual integrity.”

4. Zen in the Art of Writing by Ray Bradbury

 

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Ray Bradbury is one of the most inventive writers in recent history. His imaginative tales such as Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles are renowned for their extravagant and poignant sci-fi scenarios. In Zen of Writing, Bradbury gives us a sneak peek into his whimsical thought process.

“You grow ravenous. You run fevers. You know exhilarations. You can’t sleep at night, because your beast-creature ideas want out and turn you in your bed. It is a grand way to live.”

 

3. Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott

 

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The title comes from a short anecdote Lamott shares about her ten-year-old brother who was tasked to write a report on birds. He had three months to write it, but he waited until the last day to complete it. Distraught and overwhelmed by the enormity of his task, Lamott’s father gave him the advice to take the project “bird by bird.” Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life is Anne Lamott’s attempt to understand what those words mean in relation to the process of writing.

“You own everything that happened to you. Tell your stories. If people wanted you to write warmly about them, they should have behaved better.”

 

 

2. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

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On Writing is part memoir, part master class. King recounts his childhood up to his early career where he struggled immensely as a writer. Interwoven throughout the book are invaluable pieces of advice that show how one’s personal biography is linked to their experience as a writer.

“Writing isn’t about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid, or making friends. In the end, it’s about enriching the lives of those who will read your work, and enriching your own life, as well. It’s about getting up, getting well, and getting over. Getting happy, okay? Getting happy.”

 

1. Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke

 

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In 1903, a young man sent a few of his poems to Rainer Maria Rilke to have them critiqued. What followed was a several-year-long correspondence in which Rilke expounded upon the merits of artistic integrity and the anxieties that every young writer must face in regard to criticism, self-doubt, sincerity, and much more.

“If your daily life seems poor, do not blame it; blame yourself, tell yourself that you are not poet enough to call forth its riches; for to the creator there is no poverty and no poor indifferent place.”
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