Tag: nonfiction

Fill Your Ever-Expanding Bookshelf With Bookstr’s Nonfiction Recommendations!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are bestsellers, and showcase what’s resonating with audiences right now! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

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5. Hungry by Jeff Gordinier 

Hungry by Jeff Gordinier is a story for any food lover to wet your appetite for meals and adventure. Feeling stuck in a dead-end work life, Gordinier happens into a fateful meeting with a Danish chef Rene Redzepi. The two begin the adventure of a lifetime, to set off across the world to find new flavors, new meals, and new food together. Across the world, they begin this road trip. In Sydney, they forage for sea rocket and sandpaper figs in suburban parks and on surf-lashed beaches. On a boat in the Arctic Circle, a lone fisherman guides them to what may or may not be his secret cache of the world’s finest sea urchins. And back in Copenhagen, the quiet canal-lined city where Redzepi started it all, he plans the resurrection of his restaurant on the unlikely site of a garbage-filled lot. Along the way, readers meet Redzepi’s merry band of friends and collaborators, including acclaimed chefs such as Danny Bowien, Kylie Kwong, Rosio Sánchez, David Chang, and Enrique Olvera.

 

 

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4. Nuking the Moon by Vince Houghton 

Nuking the Moon by Vince Houghton is a funny, hilarious book on so called ‘intelligence’ schemes the military left on the drawing board. Among them are attempts to use cats as listening devices, make aircraft carriers out of icebergs, psyche out Japanese soldiers by dropping foxes onto beaches, and yes…nuking the moon in order to shift hurricane trajectories. Obviously, none of these insane ideas came to reality but you’d be surprised how close them each came in this hidden history of government antics.

 

 

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3. They bled blue by Jason Turbow

They Bled Blue by sportswriter Jason Turbow captures the Los Angeles Dodgers’ thrilling, improbable 1981 championship season, highlighting the behind the scenes antics of the edgy and cast of colorful characters of the team. Eventually, this team went on to defeat the New York Yankees. This is a summer treat for fans of sports, mad tales of excess, and the quirkiness that is the rollicking, crazy ride of the 1981 baseball season.

 

 

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2. The Vinyl Frontier by Jonathan Scott 

The Vinyl Frontier by Jonathan Scott is an unlikely story of the 1977 NASA team attempting to craft the perfect playlist to place on the Voyager probe. Led by the great Carl Sagan, the music was intended not just to represent humanity but also to advertise our world to any intelligent alien forms of life. This book tells of how the record, The Sounds of Earth, was created. The final playlist contains music written and performed by well-known names such as Bach, Beethoven, Glenn Gould, Chuck Berry and Blind Willie Johnson, as well as music from China, India and more remote cultures such as a community in Small Malaita in the Solomon Islands. It also contained a message of peace from US president Jimmy Carter, a variety of scientific figures and dimensions, and instructions on how to use it for a variety of alien lifeforms. This is a fascinating book showcasing the creation of one of humanity’s greatest achievements.

 

 

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1. Spying on the South by Tony Horwitz 

Spying on the South by Tony Horwitz is a tale of one man’s journey across the American South. Tony Horwitz recounts the experience of an American journalist who was sent to explore the South prior to the Civil War as an assignment. The book follows this journalist’s journey, as the South proved to be an alien, hostile environment. He traveled for fourteen months on stagecoach, horseback, and by boat, becoming America’s first renowned landscape architect. In the modern day, Tony Horwitz tries to follow the journey undertaken over a century ago, seeking context for the divide between the South and the rest of America.

 

 

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5 Upcoming Books Being Adapted for Film (That You Should Read)

 

We’re in an age where a lot of book properties like Netflix, Amazon Prime, and HBO are grabbing books by the truckload to adapt them for television and film. With even more book adaptations arriving this fall, but some might end up flying under your radar, owing to the source material being more obscure than Stephen King or George R.R. Martin.

Thus, here are 7 books being adapted for the fall and winter that you might want to read before they get their onscreen counterparts do.

 

5. ‘Watchmen’

 

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Watchmen is a seminal graphic novel by famed writer Alan Moore, telling the story of a supremely screwed-up batch of superheroes against the backdrop of an alternate history of America, where Richard Nixon is still President and the world is on the brink of nuclear annihilation.

 

Screenshot from HBO's 'Watchmen'

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Although it already had a Hollywood adaptation by Zack Snyder in 2009, HBO is adapting the book as a series that is set to premiere in October 2019. Well, kind of. Instead of adapting the book straight, its a sequel to the graphic novel, set 30 years in the future and showcasing the fallout of the book’s mind blowing ending. Although Alan Moore is NOT a fan of his work’s adaptations, hopefully this one can win fans over with its new take on the classic material.

 

4. ‘The Good Liar’

 

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The Good Liar tells the story of a conman who meets a wealthy widow online and intends to swindle her out of as much money as he can, confident she’ll easily fall for his charms. But the widow proves a harder mark than expected and the conman finds himself falling for her for real, despite himself.

 

'The Good Liar' movie poster

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This novel will see its big screen debut in November, starring Ian McKellen and Helen Mirren. You’ll have to read it or watch it to see the outcome of the con, one last scam that reveals the inner most hearts of people.

 

3. ‘The Earthquake Bird’

 

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The Earthquake Bird is set in Tokyo in 1989, where an English woman called Lucy with a dark past flees to Japan for a new lease on life. But her dark past haunts her, as her best friend is murdered and she begins an affair, with an ominous cloud growing darker on her each day.

 

Stars of 'The Earthquake Bird'

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Details on its film adaptation are scarce but its going to be a mystery film starring Alicia Vikander with a release sometime in 2019.

 

2. ‘His Dark Materials’

 

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His Dark Materials is a trilogy of fantasy novels set in a world called the North, where witch-clans rule and armored polar bears are used as weapons of war. The series centers on a young girl called Lyra, who finds herself in conflict with her fearsome uncle and dark forces conspiring against her, all to save her friend who was kidnapped.

 

BBC's His Dark Materials

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Probably one of the more high profile adaptations on the list, the fantasy series is being adapted by HBO and the BBC, where the first season will debut in late 2019. It will focus on the events of the first book, with more seasons doubtlessly to come after to focus on the rest of the series.

This is one you shouldn’t miss and the original books are classics, making them well recommended to check out.

 

1. ‘how to build a girl’ 

 

 

How To Build A Girl is a semi-autobiographical novel by Caitlin Moran, published in 2015. The book follows a 90s teen who reinvents herself as a fast talking, gothic writer and critic. By age sixteen, she’s become a fully fledged hard rocking, chain smoking woman who writes for high profile magazines. At once funny and horrifying, the book is a coming of age novel that showcases how the world can fail you and how making yourself into something else isn’t an escape.

 

Screenshot from the movie

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The film adaptation is coming sometime this year, starring Beanie Feldstein, Jameela Jamil, Chris O’ Dowd, and Alfie Allen. Its set to be a hard look at growing up we all need to see and read.

 

 

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Check Out These Awesome Nonfiction Books Just Waiting to Be Read!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are bestsellers, and showcase what’s resonating with audiences right now! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

5. The Unwinding of the miracle by Julie Yip-Williams

 

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The Unwinding of the Miracle by Julie Yip-Williams tells of  her rocky beginnings to finding her path in life against all expectations. Born blind in Vietnam, she narrowly escaped death at the hands of her own grandmother before fleeing the political upheaval in her country in the 1970s. She eventually made it to the USA and started a family, but then, tragedy struck. She was diagnosed with terminal colon cancer and a difficult journey began. She sought guidance and finding none, began to write for herself, channeling her emotions into her work. Telling her story in a sprawling narrative, Julie offers guidance, joy, and channels her rage into cleansing, passionate anger. As inspiring as it is tear-jerking, this is a must-read.

 

4. Unicorn by Amrou Al-Kadhi

 

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Unicorn by Amrou Al-Kadhi is a heart-wrenching and hilarious memoir about a young Muslim boy’s journey to becoming a proud, fearless drag queen. As a young boy, Amrou realized he was different when he found himself attracted to other boys, something his parents did not take kindly too and took strict measures to control him. But Amrou didn’t abandon his identity and through understanding marine biology, he accepted his own non-binary gender identity. Covering the relationship between Amrou, the world around him, and his own mother, this is a deeply enriching exploration of sexual identity that is an astounding read.

 

3. The Heat of the moment by Sabrina Cohen-Hatton

 

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The Heart of the Moment by Sabrina Cohen-Hatton is a look into the life of a firefighter through the lens of a rare female firefighter.Dr Sabrina Cohen-Hatton has been a firefighter for eighteen years. She decides which of her colleagues rush into a burning building and how they confront the blaze. She makes the call to evacuate if she believes the options have been exhausted or that the situation has escalated beyond hope. This is her astonishing account of a profession defined by the most difficult decisions imaginable.Sabrina uses her award-winning research to reveal the skills that are essential to surviving – and even thriving – in such a fast-paced and emotionally-charged environment.

 

2. Underland by Robert Macfarlane 

 

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Underland by Robert Macfarlane has been called the author’s masterpiece and it’s not hard to see why. A celebrated author of nonfiction books exploring the intersection between human nature and the natural world, with his new book Macfarlane delivers a downright epic exploration of Earth’s underworlds as they exist myth, literature, and nature itself. Exploring the sea caves of Greenland to the catacombs of Paris and underground fungal networks that run beneath the planet. Woven into these travels are stories about man’s relationship to the underground world, from cave paintings to divers to cave explorers and so much more. This is a fascinating, breathtaking novel you owe it to yourself to check out.

 

1. Love thy Neighbor by Ayaz Virji

 

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Love Thy Neighbor by Ayaz Virji is a timely book in today’s racially charged American climate. The author was living a comfortable life at an East Coast hospital in a big city but was forced to move to a small town in Minnesota to address the shortage of doctors in rural America. In 2016, this decision was tested when Donald Trump campaigned and the town swung in his favor. Some of the author’s most loyal patients began turning against him, questioning whether he belonged among them. Virji wanted out. But in 2017, just as he was lining up a job in Dubai, a local pastor invited him to speak at her church and address misconceptions about what Muslims practice and believe. That invitation has grown into a well-attended lecture series that has changed hearts and minds across the state, while giving Virji a new vocation that he never would have expected. This is a powerful novel about the consequences of toxic politics and the racism inherent across America, while pushing for a path to acceptance.

 

 

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Fill Your Bookshelf and Your Brain With Our Nonfiction Recommendations!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high-quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are bestsellers, and showcase what’s resonating with audiences right now! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

5. The Pioneers by David Mccullough 

 

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The Pioneers by David McCullough tells a modern epic tale about the settling of America after the American Revolution. As part of the Treaty of Paris, the United Kingdom officially recognized the United States as a real country and gave up the land that comprised the Northwest Territory, which would become the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. In 1788 the first band of pioneers set out for this unexplored territory to officially settle it, led by war veteran Rufus Putnam. Telling the story through multiple viewpoints, this nonfiction book chronicles the epic historical expedition, showcasing the many dangers the pioneers faced in their journey: floods, fires, bears, wolves, rapids, and navigating the hostile, rugged terrain of the wild. Drawn from diaries of the key figures involved, this novel tells of the remarkable and exciting accomplishment that led to the foundation of a new part of America.

 

4. No walls and the recurring dream by Ani Difranco

 

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No Walls And The Recurring Dream by Ani DiFranco is a memoir about Ani DiFranco about her life and the lessons it taught her. Starting from her early life and the early wisdom she gained, combining feminism, political activism, storytelling, and much more to recount her full life. She begins with her days as a basically homeless teenager, sleeping in a Buffalo bus station, before releasing her first music album at the tender age of eighteen, and choosing not to embrace her newfound fame/commercialism afterwards. She creates her own label and shares the stories of fighting to preserve artistic integrity against all odds to the contrary. And most important, DiFranco shares her proof for all personal and social obstacles can truly be overcome to create your own dream.

 

3. The Castle on sunset by Shawn levy

 

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The Castle On Sunset by Shawn Levy is a tale of scandal and myth arising from Hollywood itself. For many years, Hollywood has favored the Chateau Marmont as a home away from home, as it is an apartment turned hotel that has been the subject of rumors about the many stars that have frequented its halls. Jean Harlow took three lovers there, Anthony Perkins and Tab Hunter had a secret affair, Jim Morrison nearly fell to his death, John Belushi suffered a fatal overdose, and Lindsay Lohan was kicked out after 50,000 in charges. Much of what’s happened in the Chateau’s walls has eluded the public eye but now, author Shawn Levy takes us inside the Chateau to explore what happens inside with wit and insight. This is a glittering insight into one of Hollywood’s most hallowed institutions, told with vivid and scandalous prose.

 

2. Last boat out of shanghai by Helen Zia 

 

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Last Boat Out of Shanghai by Helen Zia is the dramatic real life story of four young people trying to flee China in the wake of the 1949 Communist revolution. As the horrors of Mao’s revolution began to wreck havoc on Shanghai in mass numbers, desperate to flee the chaos of the city. Seventy years later, this book interviews the people who fled from the city on that day discussing their exile. From these stories, four major figures emerge who the book focuses on, discussing their long and terrifying journey to escape Shanghai for uncertain journeys to Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the United States. This a heartbreaking journey of survival that nevertheless carries the promise of hope as the immigrants struggle not only to escape their own country but thrive in a new one as well.

 

1. Sea Stories by William H. McRaven

 

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Sea Stories by William H. McRaven tells the story of William McRaven, a U.S. Navy Seal who has been part of numerous military operations over his long career, including the raid to kill Osama Bin Laden, the rescue of Captain Philips, and the capture of Saddam Hussein. The book is a fascinating journey from William’s early days, as he learned the values that would define his life. From his early days sneaking into military compounds to becoming a man who would hunt terrorists, this is an action packed, thrilling tale of a real life hero.

 

 

 

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Check Out These Fourth of July Recommendations!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just to make sure you’re out there living your absolute best life! This week, we’re taking a break from the usual routine to bring you some summer reading for the 4th of July! Here are some reading recommendations as you relax on a beach, prepare to lounge by the pool, or take in the fireworks!

 

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5. Shapes of Native nonfiction edited by Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton

 

Shapes of Native Nonfiction by Elissa Warburton is a collection of essays that helps us remember America’s first people, the Indigenous Americans, even as we celebrate our own independence from British rule. This collection features a full range of dynamic Indigenous talent designed around the theme of lyric essays. Featuring imaginative and well regarded talent putting on a full range of work, this collection is one to read about America’s heritage and certainly a relaxing read beneath the warm skies.

 

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4. Because Internet by Getchen McCulloch

 

Because Internet by Gretchen McCulloch is a good book to get yourself back into the internet swing of things in a relaxing fashion. This book defines the language and slang of the internet for not so savvy internet users, as the internet is making language change faster than perhaps our brains can keep up with. The author helps unpack the evolution of digital language, providing a survey of everything from the appeal of memes to the true meaning of ‘LOL.’

 

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3. Revenge of the Punks by Vivien Goldman

 

Revenge of the Punks by Vivien Goldman is a rock and rolling book about reliving the turbulent days of youth. Goldman was Bob Marley’s first UK publicist but also wrote searing music reviews in the 70s and 80s. She now turns her pen to telling the stories of female music writers and women’s relationship to the music that defined generations. She tells stories of the genre’s rebel women such as Bikini Kill, Nehen Cherry, and activist punks. Goldman’s book explores their lives, capturing the spirit of rebellion to get you pumped for July 4th.

 

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2. Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino

 

Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino is a collection of essays revolving around our own self-destruction, fueled by the rise of social media and our increased isolation. You might not think that’s an optimistic, breezy read, but the author tackles the essays with humor and grace, tackling challenging topics with easy to understand context. This may be a little more challenging, but if you’re looking for a way to truly stop your self-reflective sense of self-delusion and self-destruction, this is the read for you.

 

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1. A Death in the rainforest by Don Kulick

 

A Death In the Rainforest by Don Kulick discusses what it means to truly study another culture that is not your own. It tells of Don Kulick, who went to the tiny village of Gapun in New Guinea to document the death of the native language, Tayap. Over thirty years, he documented the slow death of Tayap and the look of vanishing death. The story tells not only of Don’s illuminating look into the native language, but also the white society’s reach into the farthest corner of the Earth, and Kulick’s realization that he had to stop his study of the culture altogether.

 

 

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