Tag: literature

'Game of Thrones' Cast Members

‘Game of Thrones’ Cast Sends Video Messages to Dying Fan

What do we say to the God of death?

You ever have this strange feeling like you miss someone you’ve never met? You look for them everywhere and in everyone, but nothing fills that void. Then maybe you realize that the person you miss might just be a part of yourself, a tiny fraction rooted in uninhibited truth. A fraction that is often felt and filled when you pick up a book or stumble upon a story that negates any emptiness. Because sometimes, a good story is exactly what you’ve been looking for—what you’ve missed.

Image Via Theverge.com

George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire became the friend a lot of people never knew they missed. Stories like the ones that take place in Westeros operate as a distraction: a distraction from the things that might agitate us. A good story strips away our day to day worries and allows us to just be… well, us, even in the face of our own mortality. At this moment in time, the internet is flooded with GoT news, theories, and tidbits—impassioned discourse. People rally behind certain characters, resonate with certain themes, and complain about certain lighting issues.

What we see is a part of ourselves—a part that we choose to share with each other. Stories like these connect us. I’m not sure if it’s a good or a bad thing. Countless miracles and monstrosities are happening around the world at this very moment; we choose to focus on fiction.

Not Today.

 

Today we can focus on both. I read an article on WCVB’s website—about an eighty-eight-year-old woman in hospice from Rhode Island. A woman who loves a good story. This woman’s name was Claire Walton, and, like the rest of the world, she was and is a fan of Game of Thrones. Last week, she found herself marinating in anticipation for Sunday’s episode of GoT‘s finale season—an episode that had been hyped as containing one of the biggest battles sequences ever put on film. Claire joked with her care providers that she wanted to meet the cast before she died, but would settle for watching “The Battle of Winterfell/The Long Night.”

It is reported that caretakers at HopeHealth in Providence reached out to the cast regarding her fandom, and magic ensued. Ten actors from the series sent Claire reverent messages—most notably Liam Cunningham, (Sir Davos Seaworth), Miltos Yerolemou (Syrio Forel), and Josef Altin (Pypar).

“I hope you’re fit enough to watch the battle,” Cunningham said. “I wish you the very best. I hope your days are not bad and I hope you can manage. Take care!”

You can watch some of the messages via video a hospice care provider posted on Facebook:

 

Claire watched the episode in its entirety Sunday before dying Monday afternoon. Her story reminds us of one thing:  a good story can change lives—it can bring fame and joy to people as well as hope and understanding. A good story can teach us a little bit more about the human condition, bring people together, or just make someone’s day. Claire Walton’s motives were simple. In the end, she just wanted to watch her favorite show and fill herself with the type of joy that can only come from the company of a friend or a good story. Something about that feels more triumphant than the perfectly timed placement of a Valyrian steel dagger.

The HBO series set various viewership records Sunday night.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Metro UK.

"Can't believe Harry Potter dies at the end of endgame smh"

Our Favorite Bookish Tweets This Week

It’s time for some Friday Twitterature! As one of our many weekly features, Bookstr is taking a look back at some of the best tweets from our feed this week: celebs gush over Game of Thrones, spoilers threaten Avengers fans everywhere, and Jeff Bezos wants to ship to the moon. Get ready for the weekend (as if you weren’t already right there) with these literary tweets.

 

1. This dangerous tweet from kehlani

 

 

 

2. This self-promo tweet from Flo (of the machines)

 

3. This fan-fueled praise from Stephen king

 

4. in case you wanted to cry some more

 

5. Amazon ceo’s private space company is out for delivery

 

Amazon, the company set to take over the book publishing world AND the real world, may have some new developments. FYI, Blue Origin is basically Jeff Bezos’ own private NASA. We assume he wants to colonize space or become the next man to land on the moon (or the first, depending on whether or not you believe the conspiracy theory). He mysteriously Tweeted out a date without explanation or context… so, we can assume that this is the day he finally claims our souls?

 

6. family night pro-tip: don’t watch your own sex scene

 

 

 

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Children’s Book Week Kicks off April 29th for Its 100th Anniversary!

Children’s Book Week kicks off this year on April 29th! According to this article from the American Booksellers Association, the event will commence on April 29th (Monday) and continue onto May 5th. In service of the 100th anniversary of the event, the year’s theme will be “Read Now, Read Forever’, trying to encourage kids to read more while also looking to the history of children’s books as an overall experience. Bookstores around the country will be helping to host the event, with over 25,000 independent bookstores, libraries, and schools helping to promote it.

The banner for the 100th anniversary of Children's Book Week

Image Via Every Child a Reader

Established in 1919, the Children’s Book Week was started by a librarian of the Boy Scouts Franklin W. Matthiews in order higher standards to child literacy and education, as well creating true engagement for literature among young people. The event has been celebrated annually every since, with in 1944 the Children’s Book Council assuming control over the event. The event will be celebrated twice this year. If you want help get involved follow this link and help out, as well as getting your child involved! Celebrate and have fun!

 

Featured Image Children’s Book Week 

Check Out Pete Buttigieg’s 5 Favorite Books!

It seems as though presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has plenty of favorite books to read for the campaign trail! Recently, Vulture reported on some of the novels he picks up when his schedule isn’t too booked (get it?). Guess he’s a lit nerd; crazy, right? These are just a few of our favorites mentioned:

 

1. The little prince 

 

 

Few stories are as widely read and as universally cherished by children and adults alike as The Little Prince. Richard Howard’s translation of the beloved classic beautifully reflects Saint-Exupéry’s unique and gifted style. Howard, an acclaimed poet and one of the preeminent translators of our time, has excelled in bringing the English text as close as possible to the French, in language, style, and most important, spirit. The artwork in this edition has been restored to match in detail and in color Saint-Exupéry’s original artwork. Combining Richard Howard’s translation with restored original art, this definitive English-language edition of The Little Prince will capture the hearts of readers of all ages.

 

2. the quiet american 

 

 

Against the intrigue and violence of Vietnam during the French war with the Vietminh, Alden Pyle, an idealistic young American, is sent to promote democracy, as his friend, Fowler, a cynical foreign correspondent, looks on. Fowler s mistress, a beautiful native girl creates a catalyst for jealousy and competition between the men and a cultural clash resulting in bloodshed and deep misgivings. Written in 1955 prior to the Vietnam conflict, The Quiet American foreshadows the events leading up to the Vietnam conflict. Questions surrounding the moral ambiguity of the involvement of the United States in foreign countries are as relevant today as they were fifty years ago.

 

3. a child’s christmas in wales

 

 

This nostalgic recollection of Christmas past by celebrated Welsh poet Dylan Thomas evokes the beauty and tradition of the season at every turn: the warmth of a family gathering; the loveliness of a mistletoe-decked home; the predictability of cats by the fire; the mischief and fun of children left to their own devices; and the sheer delight of gifts–be they Useful or Useless.

Readers will cherish this beautiful hardcover edition of the classic A Child’s Christmas in Wales complete with gold-foil stars, a debossed, glossy front picture, and sparkling snowflakes. Once inside, readers are rewarded with stunning, midnight-blue endpapers sprinkled with a flurry of more snowflakes. This book is a must-have gift for the season.

Brilliantly illustrated by Caldecott medalist Trina Schart Hyman with a combination of more than 40 full-color and sepia-toned images, this beautiful edition of Thomas’s beloved classic will enchant readers of all ages, year after year.

 

4. the odyssey

 

Composed at the rosy-fingered dawn of world literature almost three millennia ago, The Odyssey is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home.

This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

Written in iambic pentameter verse and a vivid, contemporary idiom, Emily Wilson’s Odyssey sings with a voice that echoes Homer’s music; matching the number of lines in the Greek original, the poem sails along at Homer’s swift, smooth pace.

A fascinating, informative introduction explores the Bronze Age milieu that produced the epic, the poem’s major themes, the controversies about its origins, and the unparalleled scope of its impact and influence. Maps drawn especially for this volume, a pronunciation glossary, and extensive notes and summaries of each book make this is an Odyssey that will be treasured by a new generation of readers.

 

5. ulysses

 

Ulysses is a modernist novel by Irish writer James Joyce. It was first serialised in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach in February 1922, in Paris. It is considered to be one of the most important works of modernist literature, and has been called “a demonstration and summation of the entire movement”. According to Declan Kiberd, “Before Joyce, no writer of fiction had so foregrounded the process of thinking.” However, even proponents of Ulysses such as Anthony Burgess have described the book as “inimitable, and also possibly mad”. Ulysses chronicles the peripatetic appointments and encounters of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day, 16 June 1904. Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s epic poem Odyssey, and the novel establishes a series of parallels between its characters and events and those of the poem.

 

Featured Image via vulture (Photo: Vulture and Getty Images)

Graffiti Vandals Sentenced to Read Books

Two and a half years ago, in September 2016, Prosecutor and Deputy Commonwealth Attorney Alejandra Rueda dealt with a case where five teenagers between the ages of sixteen and seventeen were arrested for spraying offensive, racist graffiti such as swastikas on an old schoolhouse in Virginia. The schoolhouse taught black students during the era of segregation. The teenagers pleaded guilty to one count of destruction of private property and one count of unlawful entry.

 

image via bbc

 

When Rueda heard what was going on years ago, she decided to investigate it further, and when she realized it was the teenagers, she took matters into her own hands.

 

“The graffiti was racially charged – they had spray-painted swastikas and phrases like ‘White Power’ and ‘Brown Power’. But there were also images of dinosaurs, women’s breasts and penises. And I thought, ‘This doesn’t look like the work of sophisticated KKK people out to intimidate – it looks more like the work of dumb teenagers.'”

 

image via bbc

 

Reuda saw this as a learning opportunity since she believed that the children did not know what they were doing, especially when it came to spraying painting a swastika.

The judge endorsed the prosecutor’s order that the teenagers should be handed down a “disposition” as a sentence known for juvenile cases. Alejandra Rueda made a list of thirty-five books and ordered the offenders to choose one title a month for a year and to write a book report on each of the twelve books they wanted. Rueda explained that they had to write twelve assignments and 3,500-word essay on racism and what they had done.

 

Things Fall Apart – Chinua Achebe

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings – Maya Angelou

The Tortilla Curtain – T.C. Boyle

The Kite Runner Khaled Hosseini

To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee

12 Years a Slave – Solomon Northup

The Crucible – Arthur Miller

Cry the Beloved Country – Alan Paton

My Name is Asher Lev – Chaim Potok

Exodus – Leon Uris

The Color Purple – Alice Walker

Night – Elie Wiesel

 

Volunteers painted over the graffiti and the old schoolhouse was opened to the public in 2017.

 

image via bbc

 

image via bbc

 

All five of the teenagers completed their reading and writing assignments and completed their mandatory visits to the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington and the Museum of American History’s exhibit on Japanese American internment camps in the US. Two years later, the teens were unwilling to give an interview, but one of them agreed to share their final essay. “We have to educate kids out of ignorance,” says Alejandra Rueda. “And with children, our focus has to be on rehabilitation and not retribution if we want results,” the prosecutor said.

 

The final paragraph, the conclusion of the essay said, People should not feel less than what they are, and nobody should make them feel that way. I think especially awful after writing this paper about how I made anybody feel bad. Everybody should be treated with equality, no matter their race or religion or sexual orientation. I will do my best to see to it that I am never this ignorant again.

 

Check out more of the story from BBC, reported by Emma Jane Kirby and you can hear Emma Jane Kirby’s report on the World at One, on BBC Radio 4.

 

Featured Image via Photo by Kelli Tungay on Unsplash