Tag: authors

Bookstr’s Three-to-Read: Austen, Archaeology, and Assasins

Welcome back, book lovers! I am coming at you today from increasingly cozy weather and with plenty of enthusiasm to find that one book (or three) to curl up with this weekend. Let me be clear: it does not under any circumstances need to be even remotely cold for the olden curling-up-with-a-good-book to happen. But isn’t it so much nicer when it is?

Image via Amazon

HOT PICK

This one is for my fellow Austenites. Believe it or not, SP Books is releasing limited edition copies of the legitimate, longhand manuscript of Lady Susan, the only complete surviving manuscript of our favorite drawing-room hypocrisy critic’s work. This beautifully bound gem is full of irresistibly human author details like Austen’s true-to-form calligraphy and, interestingly enough, essentially no margins or interlinear space, which likely suggests our favorite Jane may have been trying to economize on paper. Sign of the times? Gimme.

Why?

Do I really need to explain much here? The world does not have enough longhand manuscripts of proto-feminist authors who are also literary legends. In a largely digital world, the magic of a person’s handwriting—seeing it, recognizing it when it often comes in the mail, learning the many shapes and angles that vary from writer to writer—is no longer a part of our daily lives, and yet it carries such a nostalgic hit of personality; who wouldn’t to get a little closer to Jane Austen’s personality?

Image via Amazon

COFFEE SHOP READ

Lightbringer is the right book end in Claire Legrand’s beloved fantasy series The Emporium Trilogy. I am not dead inside, so I’m not going to spoil it for you, but here’s a little bit about the series: it’s perfect for dark fantasy and epic fantasy readers, it features two strong female leads, and the story is told from both of their points of view. In a world of ruthless assassins, dark prophecies, and elemental magic, two queens—one foretold to be a queen of light, and the other of blood—find themselves in an imperial feud to last millenia.

Why?

Some stories are so big, they don’t fit into 300 pages. There is something about committing to a compelling saga that makes you feel like the story has committed to you right back. Anyone who appreciates quality world-building, fantastic adventure, and full-fledged female leads would do well to pick up this book (start at the beginning—Furyborn—though!).

Image via Twitter

DARK HORSE

Finally, we have book thirteen of Evans’s archaeological mystery series—Wrecked, by Mary Anna Evans.
Archaeologist Faye Longchamp learns of her friend and colleague’s suspicious drowning in what was supposed to be an underwater archaeological site. When she inspects the area and finds no trace of the shipwreck her friend meant to explore, things don’t quite add up. Additionally, when Faye learns her daughter is being romanced by a potentially dangerous man, the situation escalates a layer beyond murder mystery.

Why?

Murder mysteries and archaeology have one core characteristic in common: they are both, in some capacity, a puzzle that the living have the task of putting together if they want to get to the truth. Put them both together and you have mental jumping jacks without the extra sweaty laundry.

Stay warm and stay reading!

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Bookstr (@bookstrofficial)

No-Shave-November: 10 Authors With Legendary Facial Hair

As we’re now midway through No-Shave-November, and more people around the world are probably taking advantage of this momentous month than usual due to worldwide work-from-home circumstances, I’m sure you’re itching to see some authors with the most legendary facial hair.  I know what you’re wondering…. Does a correlation exist between beard length and literary strength? Is a connection to be found between the most memorable manuscripts and the mustachioed men who penned them? This list says it all:

Read more

Nine Literary Quotes For The Mental Health Day

It is likely that, if you’re here, you have turned to stories and poetry for comfort during dark times (or any times). Mental Health Day is around the corner and, while you may already have your go-to validation lit, I’m going to go ahead and share some of my literary chicken broth. I will confess that every fiber of my will power was involved in keeping me from sticking exclusively to Maya Angelou quotes, because that woman’s wisdom could bring me back from the dead on my worst days. So, in addition to two of my favorite tía Maya quotes, I invite you to take in some of these hot-tea-and-a-thick-quilt thoughts and put them in your pocket for the next time you’ve lost faith in humanity or find yourself at a dodgy dead end. I give you no snark as of this point, only vulnerability because I believe in safe spaces. 

 

  1. “Maybe the hardest part of my life is having the courage to try.” —Rachel Hollis, Party Girl
Author Rachel Hollis on the cover of her latest book, which she badassly published soon after her shattering divorce, via Kobo

2. “I respect myself and insist upon it from everybody. And because I do it, I then respect everybody too.” —Maya Angelou

Writer and poet Maya Angelou in all her fabulousness, via Dazed

3. “You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.” —Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie with flying colors, via Pinterest

4. “Make new mistakes. Make glorious, amazing mistakes. Make mistakes nobody’s ever made before. Don’t freeze, don’t stop, don’t worry that it isn’t good enough, or it isn’t perfect, whatever it is: art, or love, or work or family or life.” —Neil Gaiman

 

Art on moving forward, via My Modern Met

5. “I think Destiny’s purpose is merely to shock us at moments into a state of awareness; those moments are milestones in between which we have to find our own way.” —Attia Hosain, Sunlight on a Broken Column

Impasse, via Pinterest

6. “We all have an unsuspected reserve of strength inside that emerges when life puts us to the test.” —Isabel Allende

Growth and resilience, via Pinterest

7. “She uttered a quick prayer for him. Let him find balance and moderation in all things; let him listen to himself and not the noise of others.” —Balli Kaur Jaswal, Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows

Shakti art, via Society6

8. “I know for sure that love saves me and that it is here to save us all.” —Maya Angelou

Bond, via Pinterest

9. “Happiness can be found even in the darkest of times if only one remembers to turn on the light.” -Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Expecto patronum, via Harry Media

 

Mental health is often about being seen, and seeing is one of the often unspoken powers of stories. Sure, we hear of readers opening a novel, bumping into a character, and saying “hey, that’s me!” But we seldom hear of that wise Grandma Literature who sits us down wherever we are in life, holds our attention, and says “See? That’s you. You’re not alone.” You’ve heard me say this before, so I’m going to say it again: Abuela has the answers.