Tag: recommendations

Dive into These New Biographies and Great Personal Stories!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are new biographies for you to dig into and be inspired! Dig in and enjoy!

 

5. The Man in the glass House by Mark Lamster

 

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The Man in the Glass House by Mark Lamster tells the story of the most famous architect in the 20th Century: Philip Johnson. Award-winning architectural critic and biographer Mark Lamster’s The Man in the Glass House lifts the veil on Johnson’s controversial and endlessly contradictory life to tell the story of a charming yet deeply flawed man. A rollercoaster tale of the perils of wealth, privilege, and ambition, this book probes the dynamics of American culture that made him so powerful, and tells the story of the built environment in modern America.

 

4. Who Am I again? by Lenny Henry

 

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Who Am I Again? by Lenny Henry tells the extraordinary story of his early years and sudden rise to fame. Born soon after his Jamaican parents had arrived in the Midlands, Lenny was raised as one of seven siblings in a boisterous working household, and sent out into the world with his mum’s mantra of ‘H’integration! H’integration! H’integration!’ echoing in his ears. A natural ability to make people laugh came in handy. At school it helped subdue the daily racist bullying. In the park, it led to lifelong friendships and occasional snogs. Soon, it would put him on stage at working men’s clubs and Black Country discotheques—before an invitation to a TV audition changed his life for ever.

 

3. they don’t teach this by Eniola Aluko

 

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They Don’t Teach This by Eniola Aluko steps beyond the realms of memoir to explore themes of dual nationality and identity, race and institutional prejudice, success, failure and faith. It is an inspiring manifesto to change the way readers and the future generation choose to view the challenges that come in their life, applying life lessons with raw truths from Eni’s own personal experience.

 

2. 1919 by Eve L. eWing

 

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1919 by Eve L. Ewing tells of The Chicago Race Riot of 1919, the most intense of the riots comprising the nation’s Red Summer, which shaped the last century but is not widely discussed. In 1919, award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing explores the story of this event—which lasted eight days and resulted in thirty-eight deaths and almost 500 injuries—through poems recounting the stories of everyday people trying to survive and thrive in the city. Ewing uses speculative and Afrofuturist lenses to recast history, and illuminates the thin line between the past and the present.

 

1. Kd by Marcus Thompson 

 

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KD by Marcus Thompson traces the famous journey of Kevin Durant. As a sports columnist for The Athletic Bay Area, and longtime beat reporter covering the Golden State Warriors, Marcus Thompson is perfectly positioned to trace Durant’s inspirational journey. KD follows Durant’s underdog story from his childhood spent in poverty outside DC; to his rise playing on AAU teams with future NBA players; to becoming a star and hometown hero for the Oklahoma Thunder; to his controversial decision to play for the NBA rival Golden State Warriors; to his growth from prodigy into a man, in the first true inside account of this superstar player.

 

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Explore The Natural World With These Wildlife Recommendations!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s picks are wildlife recommendations to immerse yourself in the natural world. Dig in!

 

 

5. ‘Texas Reptiles and Amphibians’ by James Kavanagh

 

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Texas Reptiles & Amphibians by James Kavanagh is a handy new guide for reptile lovers in Texas. The diverse habitats of Texas—swamps, marshes, pine forests, rocky hills, mountains, deserts and prairies—combined with its central location where species from the east, west and Mexico converge, make it a prime destination to find and study reptiles and amphibians. This portable folding guide includes illustrations and descriptions of 140 species and a back-panel map featuring some of the state’s top nature viewing hot spots. A handy field reference and the perfect take-along guide for visitors and nature enthusiasts of all ages.

 

4. ‘Wildling’ by Isabelle Tree

 

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Wildling by Isabelle Tree chronicles what happens when 3,500 acres of farmland are returned to nature and what happens when the wilder world overtakes the farm. For years Charlie Burrell and his wife, Isabella Tree, farmed Knepp Castle Estate and struggled to turn a profit. By 2000, with the farm facing bankruptcy, they decided to try something radical. They would restore Knepp’s 3,500 acres to the wild. Using herds of free-roaming animals to mimic the actions of the megafauna of the past, they hoped to bring nature back to their depleted land.

 

3. ‘Make a Home for Wildlife’ by Charles Fergus 

 

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Make a Home for Wildlife helps you see your property in new ways and is the resource you need to take the sometimes daunting steps to improve the quality of your land. Focusing on the eastern US from Canada to Florida and west to the Great Plains, this book describes basic habitat types—forest, shrublands, grasslands, and wetlands—and highlights over 150 select native and introduced trees, shrubs, and plants, explaining how they are used—or not—by wildlife. The book includes more than 100 profiles of prominent and interesting species of insects, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals with information on animals and their habitat needs. Large and small mammals, resident and migratory birds, and insects are covered. Fergus relates stories of landowners who have made habitat in different states and regions in different ways.

 

2. ‘Ohio Wildlife’ by Amalia Celeste Fernand 

 

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Ohio Wildlife by Amalia Celeste Fernand is a great fun book for kids and adults. Have you ever wondered where frogs go in the winter or how to identify a bird? Do you enjoy taking walks in the woods and want to learn more about the wildlife in your backyard? Then kids and adults, this book is for you! Unique coloring pages feature Ohio wildlife with information that is formatted like a guide book. Find out about animal tracks and scat, life cycles, diet, and habitat. Increase your nature knowledge with fun facts, an extensive dictionary, art, science, games, and more. Calling all Ohio Nature Explorers, this is your go-to guide for discovering more about your favorite animals!

 

1. ‘A Field Guide to the Natural World of the Twin Cities’ John j. Moriarty 

 

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A Natural World of the Twin Citieby John J. Moriarty is a handy guide to the wildlife of Minneapolis and St. Paul. John J. Moriarty is a congenial expert on the remarkable diversity of plants and animals in the region’s habitats, from prairies and savannas to woods and wetlands such as swamps and marshes, to fens and bogs, lakes and rivers, and urban and suburban spots. Featuring Siah L. St. Clair’s remarkable photographs, maps, and commentary on natural history, this field guide invites readers to investigate the Twin Cities’ wildlife—familiar and obscure, sun-loving or nocturnal, shy or easily observed. Here are snapping turtles, otters, and Cooper’s hawks, the wild lupines, white water lilies, and sprawling white oaks, among hundreds of species found in the wild, the park, or even the backyard. Including notes on invasive species and a list of references and organizations, this book is a perfect companion and an unparalleled resource for anyone interested in discovering the rich natural world of the Twin Cities.

 

 

 

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The Best ‘Joker’ Comics to Read After The Movie!

Joker has finally arrived, drawing a ‘mixed’ response (to say the least) but one thing its done has ignited interest in the super villain himself. But with potentially thousands of Joker stories out there, where do you start and what are the best comics to check out to fully appreciate the Clown Prince of Crime’s long history? Never fear, Bookstr is here with some superb recommendations!

5. ‘Batman number 1′

Image via the Great comic Book heroes

Batman’s first solo title also chronicled the first appearances of Catwoman and the Joker. The Joker appeared right out of the gate and put a huge mark on the franchise. While Batman had fought other super villains before, such as Dr. Death and the Mad Monk, the Joker cemented his reputation as Batman’s nemesis almost immediately. This first appearance is quite old but showcases the Joker’s traits in just 11 pages: his sadistic blend of comedy and violence, his brilliance, his signature traits such as the laughter, the purple suit, white skin, and Laughing Gas, not to mention managing to outfox Batman for most of the issue. Its a great introduction to the iconic character that’ll leave you hungry for more!

4. ‘the Laughing fish’

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The Laughing Fish is a 70s story and shows the Joker at his best. Bankrupt, the Joker poisons Gotham’s river and changes the fish to give them all his signature smile. He tries to copyright them but the bank refuses, as you can’t copyright a natural resource. At an impasse, Joker begins murdering everyone who stopped his scheme, all in quite gruesome fashions. Its a dark noir story that nevertheless shows the Joker as equally funny and psychotic, especially with a scheme that makes sense to him alone.

3. ‘Arkham Asylum: A serious house on a serious earth’ 

image via batman wiki

Eesh, look at that mug. This story is one of the darkest Batman tales and the Joker certainly stands out amongst the cast. As Batman journeys into Arkham to take down his entire cast of villains. A simple story turns completely off the rails once Batman heads inside, as he experiences surrealism, the darkness of humanity and so, so much symbolism. Its a story not for everyone but if you want a scary Joker, look no further than this borderline literal monster.

2. ‘Gotham Central: Soft Targets’

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Soft Targets is the second arc in Gotham Central. This spinoff showcases the lives of cops who work at GCPD, as opposed to Batman himself and the insanity of trying to be a cop in Gotham. The Joker is a fleeting presence here but he make his threat known by killing police officers, showcasing what happens to cops who are so often the cannon fodder of criminals. By giving the police the focus, the Joker becomes much more terrifying and when he does physically show up, he’s almost larger than life thanks to the unique storyline. A hard recommendation, no pun intended.

1. ‘Going Sane’ 

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What would happen if the Joker was cured? In this storyline, the Joker thinks he’s killed Batman and with no arch enemy, his insanity vanishes. He becomes sane and forms a loving relationship with a woman. Taking the alias of Joe Kerr, the Joker seems to have left his evil behind but that all changes when Batman resurfaces. This is a great story with Joker front and center, examining his madness and his obsession with Batman. It also offers a rare glimpse of him as a normal man.

 

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Here are Bookstr’s Self-Development Recommendations!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are new self-development picks that can improve your quality of life! Dig in!

 

 

5. ‘No happy endings’ by Nora McInerny 

 

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No Happy Endings by Nora McInerny is a book for people living life after life has fallen apart. It’s a book for people who know that they’re moving forward, not moving on. It’s a book for people who know life isn’t always happy, but it isn’t the end: there will be unimaginable joy and incomprehensible tragedy. As Nora reminds us, there will be no happy endings—but there will be new beginnings.

 

4. ‘Range’ by David Epstein

 

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Range by David Epstein is all about learning from failure. This book makes a compelling case for actively cultivating inefficiency. Failing a test is the best way to learn. Frequent quitters end up with the most fulfilling careers. The most impactful inventors cross domains rather than deepening their knowledge in a single area. As experts silo themselves further while computers master more of the skills once reserved for highly focused humans, people who think broadly and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives will increasingly thrive.

 

3. ‘How to do nothing’ by jenny Odell

 

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How to To Do Nothing by Jenny Odell argues the case of doing nothing, especially in the digital age of distraction and people vying for your attention. This is is an action plan for thinking outside of capitalist narratives of efficiency and techno-determinism. Provocative, timely, and utterly persuasive, this book is a four-course meal in the age of Soylent.

 

 

2. ‘The Life Changing magic of tidying up’ by Marie Kondo

 

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The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo is a detailed book about how to declutter your house from its infernal mess. With detailed guidance for determining which items in your house “spark joy” (and which don’t), this international bestseller featuring Tokyo’s newest lifestyle phenomenon will help you clear your clutter and enjoy the unique magic of a tidy home—and the calm, motivated mindset it can inspire.

 

1. ‘Belong’ by Radha Agrawal

 

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Belong by Radha Agrawal is about building a community with like minded people in the digital age when people feel more isolated than ever. A book that’s equal parts inspiring and interactive, and packed with prompts, charts, quizzes, and full-color illustrations, Belong takes readers on a two-part journey. Part one is Going IN—a gentle but intentional process of self-discovery and finding out your true energy levels and VIA (values, interests, and abilities). Part two is Going OUT—building on all that you’ve learned about yourself to find those few special people who feed your soul, and discovering, or creating, the ever-widening groups that align with your aims and desires.

 

 

 

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The Top Ten Best Dragon Books in Fantasy Literature!

They’re big and terrible. They’re small and cute. They’re at once terrifying and majestic. Dragons have been an enduring fixation of literature pretty much ever since storytelling was invented. They can take many forms in narrative, from simple monsters to evil but intelligent villains to helpful allies to god-like divine beings. But one thing is clear: dragons are awesome and they’re extremely fun to read about. Here are the top 10 best books featuring these fire-breathing behemoths, showcasing dragons of every shape and size in all their glory for your viewing pleasure.

10. ‘Tea with the Black Dragon’ by R.A. MacAvoy

 

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Tea with the Black Dragon by R.A. MacAvoy is a Hugo nominated fantasy novel that has a classic premise: girl meets boy and boy turns about to be a dragon. Martha’s daughter, Elizabeth, is in trouble in San Francisco and Martha hurries into the strange city to help her missing child. But when she arrives, the only person who knows where Elizabeth might be is the mysterious stranger Mayland Long. Did we mention Mr. Long can transform into a dragon? Its up to these two to find Elizabeth, even as Martha begins to feel romantic feelings for her newfound dragon companion.

 

9. ‘Three hearts and three lions’ by Poul Anderson

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Three Hearts and Three Lions by Poul Anderson tells of a man transported into a world of fantasy. Holger Carlsten is a Resistance fighter fighting against the Nazis during World War II but when he’s wounded in battle, the luckless engineer finds himself transported to another world. Against a medieval backdrop, he finds himself in a battle where the forces of Law fight against Chaos. Monsters abound this land, including werewolves, giants, trolls, faeries, and yes: dragons. Revered as a Champion, Holger must take up arms and join the brave knights, ready to slay some dragons (alongside other fearsome beasts) as the leader of the forces of Law.

8. ‘His Majesty’s Dragon’ by Naomi Novik 

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His Majesty’s Dragon by Naomi Novik tells a historically accurate account of the Napoleonic Wars, with an added twist: dragons! Yes, this is an alternate history novel where dragons are used as the main force of combat, adding a thrilling new element to the tides of war sweeping Europe. When Captain Will Laurence finds an unhatched dragon egg, his life is turned upside down when the dragon hatches and imprints on him. Joining the Aerial Corps, Laurence and his dragon, Temeraine, must take to the skies to defend Britain from France’s own dragon armies.

 

7. ‘The Great Zoo of China’ by Matthew Reilly 

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The Great Zoo of China by Matthew Reilly is basically Jurassic Park but with dragons! For years, China has been keeping the existence of live dragons a secret but is preparing to unveil them to the world is the first ever dragon zoo. A small group of V.I.P.s are brought into the zoo to see the beasts first hand and inspect the safety of the place. Because, surely, nothing can go wrong? Right? Just kidding. Get ready for tons of action and lots of dragon destruction when things spiral out of control.

6. ‘Tooth and Claw’ by Jo Walton

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Tooth and Claw by Jo Walton is a unique twist on dragon literature. Told from the point of view of dragons themselves, this is a world of politics, family, and relationships but instead of humans, everyone is a dragon. In a society where the weak are literally eaten and the strong thrive as tyrants, this is a story like no other, as it showcases what the reality of a dragon’s world is truly like.

 

5. ‘The Hero and the crown’ by Robin McKinely 

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The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinely is a rich young adult novel full of feminist themes and a terrifying dragon as the main antagonist. Aerin is an outcast in her own kingdom, a woman looked down upon for being rumored to be the spawn of a witch. Determined to earn her birthright, she decides to slay a dragon but modern dragons are a far cry from the terrible beasts of old. They’re just vermin and although certainly formidable, they’re nothing but pests. Until the day a knight rides into the castle and reports the return of a great dragon from the old days. Maur, said to be as big as a mountain, has returned and is ransacking the kingdom. Seeing her chance, Aerin rides off with only her horse as a companion to face Maur and slay him.

 

4. ‘Dragonsbane’ by Barbara Hambly 

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Dragonsbane by Barbara Hambly focuses on a young prince who must join forces with a retired dragon slayer and a witch who can’t use her magic quite right. Joining forces to form a ragtag dragon slaying “crew”, the trio must journey forth to slay the terrible beast or die trying.

 

3. ‘Dragon Keeper’ by Robin Hobb


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Dragon Keeper by Robin Hobb tells of a resurgence of dragons into a world that hates and fears them, yet might need them to save it. Telling of a young boy who travels up river to find a dragon egg in order to breed more dragons to defend his land, they find a set of newly hatched but injured baby dragons. With the help of quirky companions, the boy must ferry these dragons their new home across the wilds, with no hope of return but everything riding on his journey back.

 

2. ‘Earthsea’ by Ursula K. Le Guin 

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Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin needs no introduction. Some of the most acclaimed works in fantasy literature, the world of Earthsea features a unique setting (an island archipelago) and people of color as the protagonists. Dragons are a huge component of the setting, from fearsome Western style monsters to more refined, almost Eastern style of creatures. This is one series that is a classic for a reason and you should dig into for certain, especially as a dragon lover.

1. ‘The Hobbit’ by J.R.R. Tolkien 

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The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien began many a person’s love of dragons and fantasy. Bilbo Baggins is a Hobbit who enjoys a comfortable life when he finds himself yanked from his sleepy little town by the wizard Gandalf and a group of dwarves. Together, they set across Middle-earth to seal the great dragon Smaug’s treasure from his lair in the Lonely Mountain. Smaug himself is an inspired creation and the highlight of the book but the rest is a classic adventure tale and one that will surely please any fantasy lover even today!

Featured Image Via LOTR Wiki