Tag: recommendations

Fill Your Ever-Expanding Bookshelf With Bookstr’s Nonfiction Recommendations!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are bestsellers, and showcase what’s resonating with audiences right now! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

Image via Amazon

 

5. Hungry by Jeff Gordinier 

Hungry by Jeff Gordinier is a story for any food lover to wet your appetite for meals and adventure. Feeling stuck in a dead-end work life, Gordinier happens into a fateful meeting with a Danish chef Rene Redzepi. The two begin the adventure of a lifetime, to set off across the world to find new flavors, new meals, and new food together. Across the world, they begin this road trip. In Sydney, they forage for sea rocket and sandpaper figs in suburban parks and on surf-lashed beaches. On a boat in the Arctic Circle, a lone fisherman guides them to what may or may not be his secret cache of the world’s finest sea urchins. And back in Copenhagen, the quiet canal-lined city where Redzepi started it all, he plans the resurrection of his restaurant on the unlikely site of a garbage-filled lot. Along the way, readers meet Redzepi’s merry band of friends and collaborators, including acclaimed chefs such as Danny Bowien, Kylie Kwong, Rosio Sánchez, David Chang, and Enrique Olvera.

 

 

Image via Amazon

 

4. Nuking the Moon by Vince Houghton 

Nuking the Moon by Vince Houghton is a funny, hilarious book on so called ‘intelligence’ schemes the military left on the drawing board. Among them are attempts to use cats as listening devices, make aircraft carriers out of icebergs, psyche out Japanese soldiers by dropping foxes onto beaches, and yes…nuking the moon in order to shift hurricane trajectories. Obviously, none of these insane ideas came to reality but you’d be surprised how close them each came in this hidden history of government antics.

 

 

Image via Amazon

 

3. They bled blue by Jason Turbow

They Bled Blue by sportswriter Jason Turbow captures the Los Angeles Dodgers’ thrilling, improbable 1981 championship season, highlighting the behind the scenes antics of the edgy and cast of colorful characters of the team. Eventually, this team went on to defeat the New York Yankees. This is a summer treat for fans of sports, mad tales of excess, and the quirkiness that is the rollicking, crazy ride of the 1981 baseball season.

 

 

image via Amazon 

 

2. The Vinyl Frontier by Jonathan Scott 

The Vinyl Frontier by Jonathan Scott is an unlikely story of the 1977 NASA team attempting to craft the perfect playlist to place on the Voyager probe. Led by the great Carl Sagan, the music was intended not just to represent humanity but also to advertise our world to any intelligent alien forms of life. This book tells of how the record, The Sounds of Earth, was created. The final playlist contains music written and performed by well-known names such as Bach, Beethoven, Glenn Gould, Chuck Berry and Blind Willie Johnson, as well as music from China, India and more remote cultures such as a community in Small Malaita in the Solomon Islands. It also contained a message of peace from US president Jimmy Carter, a variety of scientific figures and dimensions, and instructions on how to use it for a variety of alien lifeforms. This is a fascinating book showcasing the creation of one of humanity’s greatest achievements.

 

 

Image via Amazon

 

 

1. Spying on the South by Tony Horwitz 

Spying on the South by Tony Horwitz is a tale of one man’s journey across the American South. Tony Horwitz recounts the experience of an American journalist who was sent to explore the South prior to the Civil War as an assignment. The book follows this journalist’s journey, as the South proved to be an alien, hostile environment. He traveled for fourteen months on stagecoach, horseback, and by boat, becoming America’s first renowned landscape architect. In the modern day, Tony Horwitz tries to follow the journey undertaken over a century ago, seeking context for the divide between the South and the rest of America.

 

 

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Here Are Our Book Lovers Day Staff Picks!

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaku and His Years of Pilgrimage – Haruki Murakami

 

 

Surrealism

“The themes of finding closure for unresolved personal negativities really resonated with me.” – Nate

 

The Space Between – Brenna Yovanoff

 

 

Fantasy

“This is a book about being deeply flawed, and how even as you’re trying to be better, it’s honest to let those things stay a part of you.” – Kali

 

 

The Last Unicorn – Peter Beagle

 

 

Fantasy/Children’s

“It Reminds me that there’s magic in the world even if you can’t see it.” – Becky

 

The Prisoner of Azkaban – J. K. Rowling

 

Fantasy

“I enjoyed it.” – Richard

 

 

The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway

 

 

Literary Fiction

“This is one of Hemingway’s most compelling books due to the religious themes and the focus on minority groups, at a time when prejudice in America was prevalent.” – Kyle

 

The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

 

Literary Fiction

“A good narrative that gives a view into the minds of the characters.” – Lexi

 

 

Gone – Michael Grant

 

 

Science Fiction

“It’s very entertaining and has a mystery you want to solve.” – Heather

 

Ties of Shooting Stars – Keigo Higashino

 

 

Detective

“The mystery keeps you guessing, and the build-up for the plot twist has a great payoff.” – Derek

 

 

The Thief Lord – Cornelia Funke

 

 

Children’s

“I found it really empowering as a child, with these kids taking care of themselves and fighting for good.” – Amy

 

The Lightning Thief – Rick Riordan

 

 

Fantasy

“I like Greek mythology, and the book’s funny, witty humor.” – Tim

 

 

Images via Amazon 

Featured image via Upslash 

Two Dark Fantasy Duologies to Binge This Weekend

No plans this weekend? Not the type to go outside? We can relate. Make the best of the weekend for real by binging these duologies. Nothing says relaxation like high stakes magic.

 

Six of Crows & Crooked Kingdom

 

Image via Amazon

 

I love a good heist, and this is better than most. Set in the lush universe popularized by Shadow and Bone, this follow up stands on its own legs, and is a great entry to the series. Meet the Dregs, a bunch of street urchin weirdos with just the right skills to pull off an impossible heist in the heart of a hostile state. The characters are so real that you feel you could bump into them on the street, the plot is meticulously executed, and the magic is both grounded and vibrant. It’ll be your new fave.

 

 

The Orphan Queen & The Mirror King

 

Image via Amazon

 

Revolution, dictatorships, secret identities, and a magic system so brutal and so inescapable it shakes the very ground on which the world is built. All the threats feel close, pressing. The characters are multidimensional, living, complex. This is a deeply alarming pair of novels, but despite the dark plot points, the writing is light and compulsively readable. These are entertaining books, and frequently very funny. If you like seeing sense prevail, and survival against dire odds, dive into this truly original world.

 

 

Featured image via ZippyPixels

4 Upcoming Sequels and Where to Start

There are a lot of exciting sequels coming up, and if you’ve left preparation for the last minute, don’t panic: here are four forthcoming books and how you can catch before they come out!

 

-SPOILER FREE-

 

1. When She Reigns – Jodi Meadows

When She Reigns
Image via Amazon

 

Where to start: Before She Ignites and its sequel As She Ascends

A lush fantasy world and slow burn plot that’ll keep you thinking until the final book on September 10th, pick up this book if you want an amazing story that’ll make you feel things. Plus you’ll love the complexity of the characters and their relationships.

 

 

2. Wayward Son – Rainbow Rowell

Wayward Son
Image via Amazon

 

Where to start: Carry On

This series is a great take on wizard school. We start in the last year. Simon Snow’s got a lot of power, but he’s not good at using it. Also he’s pretty sure his roommate is a secret vampire. And something is eating magic in great, horrible swathes. Also, LGBTQAA+.

 

3. Supernova – Marissa Meyer

Supernova
Image via Amazon

 

Where to start: Renegades and its sequel Archenemies

This is a post-Utopian urban fantasy about villainy and revenge. Superpowers, syndicates, and spy craft make this different from other entries into the genre, and you’ll find the characters awfully charming or charmingly awful. Sides are set in stone, and one person’s interests might contradict.

 

 

4. Children of Virtue and Vengeance  – Tomi Adeyemi

Children of Virtue and Vengeance
Image via Amazon

 

Where to start: Children of Blood and Bone

Magic and it’s users were killed off by ruthless invaders, but now there’s one chance to bring it back. To do so will require crossing territory filled with beasts and magic, side by side with an enemy, but the greatest struggle may be controlling the magic that’s left.

 

 

Featured image via Hope Walks Blog

Webtoons and Where to Start

If you haven’t heard yet, WebToon is a platform for serialized graphic novels. Yeah, these are comics, and some are gorgeously drawn and deeply potted narratives that you don’t want to miss. Here’s our guide on how to get on board, starting by genre.

Webtoon has a website, if you want to see the art blown up, but it’s most alive on the app.

 

 

Best of the Best – Lore Olympus 

 

Lore Olympus 
Image via Webtoon

 

This comic tops the overall WebToon list with extreme regularity, and for good reason. The art is outrageously beautiful, the characters are complex and compulsively likable (or outrageously easy to hate), and the plotting is gorgeous. Persephone has left the mortal world to go to university on Olympus, but things get complicated almost immediately. This is a must read if you have any interest in myth, fantasy, or just really like fantastic graphic novels.

 

Paranormal – Krueger & Faust 

 

Krueger & Faust 
Image via Webtoon

 

Alice Kruger has been through a lot. No spoilers, but she’s had a bit of a bad year, and now, her cat knocks a pot off a windowsill and hits her on the head. This gives her the power to see supernatural beings, including the monster in her closet? Most people would be understandably put off, but Faust’s alright, and he certainly has problems of his own. Read this if you like a quality combination of paranormal silliness and dire peril.

 

 

Action – Phantomland 

 

Phantomland
Image via Webtoon

 

This comic has everything – an optimistic rookie paired with a cantankerous vet, a supernatural plague that erases your memories and makes you hard to kill, vaguely sketchy military organizations. The magic is seamlessly embedded in the world, the characters are compelling, and there’s plenty of running around stabbing and shooting people. It’s a classic model done in a very new and interesting way. And it has journalistic integrity.

 

Intrigue – My Dear Cold Blooded King 

 

My Dear Cold Blooded King 

Image via Imglogy

 

Mei is pretty normal. She’s been selling her family’s apples since her brother died in the Blood King’s army. Then she accidentally saves the life of the new Blood King’s young brother, and gets taken to the capital. It turns out her family is more connected to the capital than she thinks, and she’s suddenly on the radar of the Blood King, his chief generals, foreign royalty, and the most fearsome criminal in the empire. Mei is smart and tough and way out of her depth (or anyone’s).

 

 

Slice of Life – True Beauty

 

True Beauty
Image via AuthGram

 

After being bullied in middle school, Jugyeong decides she’ll learn how to do ‘beauty’ and become popular at her new school, which kind of works. It’s an interesting examination of the weird contradictions of beauty standards, without getting too philosophical or stepping on the story. This comic is funny, heartfelt, and relatable, but watch out for the cliffhangers! This also regularly tops WebToon lists, which it deserves.

 

Fantasy – Muted

 

Muted
Image via Twitter

 

Camille’s whole family died in a fire when she was young, and she had to live with her very severe aunt, now head of the Severin witch family. Everything goes (more) wrong when she tries to summon a demon for a rite of passage, and can’t summon a bird like she should. The art is beautiful, and the setting, a manor house in Louisiana, is elegant and immersive. Alligators, gal pals, and family secrets make this a must read.

 

 

Romance – Ms. Abbott & the Doctor 

 

Mrs. Abbot and The Doctor
Image via Anime Planet

 

This is not your standard romance. Cati Abbott is the orphaned daughter of idealists who died in ‘Amazonia’. Taken home to some more industrialized country by her anthropologist mentor, she’s considered charmingly eccentric, at best. Enter the town’s tight laced doctor. Chaos ensues, and they realize all this petty conflict might be something else.

 

Crime – Purple Hyacinth 

 

Purple Hyacinth 
Image via 41a

 

Lauren has always been able to tell when people are lying to her. After losing someone close to her, she becomes a police officer, but never stops trying to find out what happened. Her power makes her an effective officer, but when an assassin offers her information and help in stopping his boss, and maybe even with her mystery, it’s hard to turn down the opportunity to save lives and find answers.

 

 

Comedy – Cursed Princess Club

 

Cursed Princess Club
Image via Webtoon

 

Gwendolyn is a bit of an ugly duckling compared to her anime eyed sisters, but this doesn’t bother her or her family. Her very caring father decides that his three daughters will marry his BFF’s three sons, easy as it gets. The only problem is that Gwendolyn’s suitor is terrified of her. Running into the forest so her sisters don’t see her crying and boycott the whole thing, Gwendolyn meets a bunch of other princesses under strange curses.

 

Foreign Language – Flawless 

 

Flawless
Image via PicDeer

 

WebToon also publishes foreign language stories translated by fans. Flawless is a strange, philosophical examination of relationships, blindness, and how we treat others. Mostly it’s just fun though. Elios grows up in an orphanage, and when his foster sister gets in trouble, he ropes in Sarah, a local girl who gets into a ton of fights, in order to retrieve his sister. They somehow become friends, and end up going to the same high school. A fun read. (originally published in Indonesian)

 

 

Featured image from ComicsBeat