Tag: recommendations

Pick a Setting, We’ll Recommend the Perfect Book

No matter where you’re spending the holidays, we’ve got a book to put you where you WISH you were.

 

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The 2 Books Bill Gates Says You Absolutely Must Read

Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft, has always been an avid reader, and he’s not one to shy away from recommending books he finds thought-provoking. During a speech at his old high school where he met Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, Gates highlighted two books he thinks are “pretty fundamental” to read for the people he hires.

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Factfulness, the first book on Gates’ recommended list, is about ten instincts that distort our perceptions of the world and how to overcome those distortions. In a 2018 blog post about the book, Gates had this to say:

Hans [Rosling], the brilliant global-health lecturer who died last year, gives you a breakthrough way of understanding basic truths about the world—how life is getting better, and where the world still needs to improve. And he weaves in unforgettable anecdotes from his life. It’s a fitting final word from a brilliant man, and one of the best books I’ve ever read.

Gates noted that Factfulness is especially valuable to anyone graduating from college and making the transition into the next phase of life.

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The Better Angels of Our Nature, written by Steven Pinker, is the other book on Gates recommended list. In another blog post, Gates wrote that it “offers a really fresh perspective on how to achieve positive outcomes in the world”

Steven Pinker shows us ways we can make those positive trajectories a little more likely. That’s a contribution, not just to historical scholarship, but to the world.

Gates has said that these couple of books are key to his mission as a philanthropist. But overall, the “key metric” that Gates says everyone needs to develop in order to be successful is “self-confidence as a learner and willingness to keep learning.”

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Have you read any of these two books? Do you think you’ll follow Gates’ advice and pick them up? Let us know on Instagram and Facebook!

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Improve Your Life With These Awesome Book Recommendations!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are self development picks to improve your quality of life! Dig in and enjoy!

 

 

5. ‘How to be bawse’ by Lilly Singh 

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How To Be Bawse by Lilly Singh offers her advice on success and shares what she learned on her way to internet superstardom. Her tips are both conventional (things like “say what you mean”) and unconventional (“be the dumbest person” in the room — aka, learn from those who are smart than you).

 

4. ‘Presence’ by Amy Cuddy

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Presence by Amy Cuddy shows how to get the best of those stressful situations without doing a lot of life-changing and soul-searching. Instead, she delves into research about how things like body language, posture, and other mind-body techniques can banish the butterflies from our stomachs.

 

3. ‘Deep work’ by Cal Newport

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Deep Work by Cal Newport, a professor of Georgetown, outlines the benefit of really tuning out all distractions, and gives four rules to help re-wire yourself so you can deeply focus again. (Check now: How many browser tabs do you have open?)

 

2. ‘creativity inc.’ by ed Catmull

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Creativity INC. by Ed Catmull tells of the process of creativity and inspiration through the eyes of Pixar. People think of Pixar as a company that creates great art — and it is — but it’s also a business. One of the co-founders of the animation studio goes into the company’s nerve center to show how Pixar’s leadership and management styles protect and nourish its creative output. Whether you’re a Woody or a Buzz, you can learn something about heading up a team from Pixar’s unique organizational structure.

 

1. ‘the little book of hygge’ by meik wiking

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The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking is all about the cozy Danish philosophy of hygge. But what exactly is it again, apart from being, well, cozy? And how do you achieve it at home in your chaotic, not-all-that-cozy life? Meik Wiking demystifies it all, showing how light, food and drink, and togetherness can make for a happier home.

 

 

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Dive into These New Biographies and Great Personal Stories!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are new biographies for you to dig into and be inspired! Dig in and enjoy!

 

5. The Man in the glass House by Mark Lamster

 

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The Man in the Glass House by Mark Lamster tells the story of the most famous architect in the 20th Century: Philip Johnson. Award-winning architectural critic and biographer Mark Lamster’s The Man in the Glass House lifts the veil on Johnson’s controversial and endlessly contradictory life to tell the story of a charming yet deeply flawed man. A rollercoaster tale of the perils of wealth, privilege, and ambition, this book probes the dynamics of American culture that made him so powerful, and tells the story of the built environment in modern America.

 

4. Who Am I again? by Lenny Henry

 

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Who Am I Again? by Lenny Henry tells the extraordinary story of his early years and sudden rise to fame. Born soon after his Jamaican parents had arrived in the Midlands, Lenny was raised as one of seven siblings in a boisterous working household, and sent out into the world with his mum’s mantra of ‘H’integration! H’integration! H’integration!’ echoing in his ears. A natural ability to make people laugh came in handy. At school it helped subdue the daily racist bullying. In the park, it led to lifelong friendships and occasional snogs. Soon, it would put him on stage at working men’s clubs and Black Country discotheques—before an invitation to a TV audition changed his life for ever.

 

3. they don’t teach this by Eniola Aluko

 

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They Don’t Teach This by Eniola Aluko steps beyond the realms of memoir to explore themes of dual nationality and identity, race and institutional prejudice, success, failure and faith. It is an inspiring manifesto to change the way readers and the future generation choose to view the challenges that come in their life, applying life lessons with raw truths from Eni’s own personal experience.

 

2. 1919 by Eve L. eWing

 

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1919 by Eve L. Ewing tells of The Chicago Race Riot of 1919, the most intense of the riots comprising the nation’s Red Summer, which shaped the last century but is not widely discussed. In 1919, award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing explores the story of this event—which lasted eight days and resulted in thirty-eight deaths and almost 500 injuries—through poems recounting the stories of everyday people trying to survive and thrive in the city. Ewing uses speculative and Afrofuturist lenses to recast history, and illuminates the thin line between the past and the present.

 

1. Kd by Marcus Thompson 

 

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KD by Marcus Thompson traces the famous journey of Kevin Durant. As a sports columnist for The Athletic Bay Area, and longtime beat reporter covering the Golden State Warriors, Marcus Thompson is perfectly positioned to trace Durant’s inspirational journey. KD follows Durant’s underdog story from his childhood spent in poverty outside DC; to his rise playing on AAU teams with future NBA players; to becoming a star and hometown hero for the Oklahoma Thunder; to his controversial decision to play for the NBA rival Golden State Warriors; to his growth from prodigy into a man, in the first true inside account of this superstar player.

 

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Explore The Natural World With These Wildlife Recommendations!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s picks are wildlife recommendations to immerse yourself in the natural world. Dig in!

 

 

5. ‘Texas Reptiles and Amphibians’ by James Kavanagh

 

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Texas Reptiles & Amphibians by James Kavanagh is a handy new guide for reptile lovers in Texas. The diverse habitats of Texas—swamps, marshes, pine forests, rocky hills, mountains, deserts and prairies—combined with its central location where species from the east, west and Mexico converge, make it a prime destination to find and study reptiles and amphibians. This portable folding guide includes illustrations and descriptions of 140 species and a back-panel map featuring some of the state’s top nature viewing hot spots. A handy field reference and the perfect take-along guide for visitors and nature enthusiasts of all ages.

 

4. ‘Wildling’ by Isabelle Tree

 

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Wildling by Isabelle Tree chronicles what happens when 3,500 acres of farmland are returned to nature and what happens when the wilder world overtakes the farm. For years Charlie Burrell and his wife, Isabella Tree, farmed Knepp Castle Estate and struggled to turn a profit. By 2000, with the farm facing bankruptcy, they decided to try something radical. They would restore Knepp’s 3,500 acres to the wild. Using herds of free-roaming animals to mimic the actions of the megafauna of the past, they hoped to bring nature back to their depleted land.

 

3. ‘Make a Home for Wildlife’ by Charles Fergus 

 

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Make a Home for Wildlife helps you see your property in new ways and is the resource you need to take the sometimes daunting steps to improve the quality of your land. Focusing on the eastern US from Canada to Florida and west to the Great Plains, this book describes basic habitat types—forest, shrublands, grasslands, and wetlands—and highlights over 150 select native and introduced trees, shrubs, and plants, explaining how they are used—or not—by wildlife. The book includes more than 100 profiles of prominent and interesting species of insects, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals with information on animals and their habitat needs. Large and small mammals, resident and migratory birds, and insects are covered. Fergus relates stories of landowners who have made habitat in different states and regions in different ways.

 

2. ‘Ohio Wildlife’ by Amalia Celeste Fernand 

 

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Ohio Wildlife by Amalia Celeste Fernand is a great fun book for kids and adults. Have you ever wondered where frogs go in the winter or how to identify a bird? Do you enjoy taking walks in the woods and want to learn more about the wildlife in your backyard? Then kids and adults, this book is for you! Unique coloring pages feature Ohio wildlife with information that is formatted like a guide book. Find out about animal tracks and scat, life cycles, diet, and habitat. Increase your nature knowledge with fun facts, an extensive dictionary, art, science, games, and more. Calling all Ohio Nature Explorers, this is your go-to guide for discovering more about your favorite animals!

 

1. ‘A Field Guide to the Natural World of the Twin Cities’ John j. Moriarty 

 

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A Natural World of the Twin Citieby John J. Moriarty is a handy guide to the wildlife of Minneapolis and St. Paul. John J. Moriarty is a congenial expert on the remarkable diversity of plants and animals in the region’s habitats, from prairies and savannas to woods and wetlands such as swamps and marshes, to fens and bogs, lakes and rivers, and urban and suburban spots. Featuring Siah L. St. Clair’s remarkable photographs, maps, and commentary on natural history, this field guide invites readers to investigate the Twin Cities’ wildlife—familiar and obscure, sun-loving or nocturnal, shy or easily observed. Here are snapping turtles, otters, and Cooper’s hawks, the wild lupines, white water lilies, and sprawling white oaks, among hundreds of species found in the wild, the park, or even the backyard. Including notes on invasive species and a list of references and organizations, this book is a perfect companion and an unparalleled resource for anyone interested in discovering the rich natural world of the Twin Cities.

 

 

 

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