Platonic Relationships are Important: An-Anti Love Series

In today’s Anti-Love Series article, we are displaying how platonic relationships are important by looking at some fantastic novels!

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February is the month of love. With Valentine’s day right around the corner, and frilly pink decor crowding the store shelves, doesn’t it just make you feel in the mood for love? Well, for all of those out there who are going solo this season of romance, let me provide you with another perspective: love (or relationships, for that matter) doesn’t always have to be romantic in order for it to be fulfilling. 

Valentine’s Day is a day that has been marketed towards couples for decades and decades. But, as time evolves there is this new idea that Valentine’s day can also be for friends. Love is more than just romance and sensual emotion. Love lives in friendships, and family relationships as well. Platonic relationships are just as important to have as romantic ones. Without friendships, there would be less magic and excitement in the world. Who would you go to complain and share your favorite chick flicks with? 

In this rendition of our anti-love series, we are here to provide some bookish examples of how platonic relationships are there for you this Valentine’s Day season. For those who are rejoicing in the love of friendships, here are 5 must-read books that display the importance of friendships.

Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo 

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This novel shows the interconnected stories of 12 different characters who are mostly women, black, and British. While the novel displays many different relationships from maternal to romantic, it also centralizes friendships and how they have their ups and downs. 

The Familiars by Stacey Halls 

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Taken place in the 17th Century, this story centers around the character Fleetwood. She is young and pregnant without many allies by her side. Her mother is cold and distant, and her husband is practically nonexistent. She is left alone in her grand home to ponder what her future holds. Fleetwood then meets Alice, who has the power to keep her unborn child healthy. The pair soon develop an unlikely friendship and become increasingly reliant on each other. Moreso than they could have ever imagined. 

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

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Image Via Good House Keeping

This is a heartwarming story about the importance of reaching out the hand of friendship. Eleanor is a misfit and socially inept. She leads a lonely life until Raymond joins her office as a new coworker. She finds solace in this newfound friendship. As their bond grows, she begins to cope with her troubling past and move on from her traumas. 

Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams 

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Queenie is in her twenties and a journalist living in London. She is navigating some changes in her life. Not only is her relationship with her boyfriend, Tom, fading; but, things are falling apart at the home she has loved all of her life. As she struggles to keep afloat, Queenie’s eclectic group of friends are there to rally around her. 

Swing Time by Zadie Smith 

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Image Via Good House Keeping

Two friends dream of becoming dancers, but while one is determined to plan her career and her future, it’s Tracey who has what it takes to succeed. This novel depicts the two’s close but complex friendship that ends abruptly in their early adulthood. Never to revisited, but more importantly to never to be forgotten.

If you are someone that is sick and tired of romantic love being forced into the world this month, this is the series for you. Be sure to keep updated with us, and you can check out our most recent article here

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