Inside The World Of Chronic “Invisible” Diseases: Three To Read

July is Chronic Disease Month, and we are using both fiction and nonfiction books to shed a light on those that live with “invisible” health conditions.

Book Culture Diverse Voices Recommendations Three To Read
Three to Read: Chronic Disease Month

Welcome back, book lovers! It is finally July, which means that it is Chronic Disease Month. Every year, we strive to advocate for those that live with chronic diseases, illnesses, and conditions. Many times, those that have chronic diseases are made to feel less than just because their illness is “invisible” compared to others. It is important to listen to and respect those within the community.

In this week’s edition of Bookstr’s Three to Read, we are recommending you three books that explore characters and people that live with chronic diseases and illnesses and how they perceive themselves and the people around them.

Hot Pick

One For All

by Lillie Lainoff

One For All
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SYNOPSIS:

In this gender-bent retelling of The Three Musketeers, Tania de Batz dreams of being a master fencer like her Musketeer father. She is generally known as the “sick girl” of the town who suffers from POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome). But when her father is mysteriously murdered, she fulfills his wish for her to attend a secret training ground for women protecting France. With a new purpose and friends, Tania has a decision to make between duty and her heart.

WHY:

One For All is Lilie Lainoff’s debut novel. Similar to her protagonist, Lainoff also lives with POTS. There are two author’s notes at the end of the book that discusses chronic illness and POTS representation, and detail the condition and its symptoms, along with further sites and resources for readers to learn more.

Beach Read

The Invisible Kingdom: Reimagining Chronic Illness

by Meghan O’Rourke

The Invisible Kingdom
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SYNOPSIS:

In her latest memoir, Meghan O’Rourke dives into her autoimmune diseases, post-treatment for her Lyme disease syndrome, and living with long COVID. Using interviews with medical professionals and fellow patients, while also giving her own insight, she takes readers into a life of illnesses and conditions that many may not recognize at first glance. This memoir gives hope to anyone, especially women, who are victims of America’s broken healthcare system.

WHY:

Author of The Long Goodbye: A Memoir, Meghan O’Rourke brings comfort to those living with chronic illnesses and diseases with her latest work. Many often overlook these conditions such as Lyme or long Covid just because they are not as visible as other diseases. Reading about her experiences can help family and friends better understand how their loved one is feeling.

Dark Horse

The Hollow Sea

by Annie Kirby

The Hollow Sea
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SYNOPSIS:

After finding out that she may never be a mother, Scottie leaves for St. Hia. There are ancient rumors that tell of a witch named Thordis that committed unspeakable acts when she could not produce a child for her husband. The islanders warn Scottie of these rumors, but she can’t help but be invested in this mysterious tale. This magical novel draws readers in with its beautiful writing and mythology.

WHY:

In her debut novel, Annie Kirby provides representation for those that have chronic mental illnesses. Aside from discussing difficult subject matter such as trauma and depression, the novel also focuses on psychogenic disorders. Kirby herself lives with chronic illness and has climbed out from her rock bottom to produce a beautiful work of art. The Hallow Sea is set to be published in August of 2022.

We hope to continue uplifting and listening to those in the chronic disease community, especially beyond the month of July! For last week’s Three to Read, click here!

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