Tag: Science Fiction

Books to Read Before They Become Movies

If you’re a book lover, then your favorite thing to say is probably “Oh, the book was SO much better than the movie!” and we don’t disagree, because it probably was! So before these awesome tales turn into movies in the new year, make sure you snag a few so you can spit out the same line when the adaptations come out!

 

p.s I still love you by jenny han

image via trending news buzz

This is the ever anticipated sequel to the famous YA book and later Netflix film, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before by author Jenny Han, and it will be available to stream on February 12, just two days before Valentines Day! This story is said to focus on Lara Jean’s new relationship with Peter Kavinsky. But this is a high school romance movie, so it’s required to feature a love triangle, and you bet it does!

 

 

dune by frank herbert

Image Via Dread central

Frank Herbert’s sci-fi masterpiece Dune, is getting its long promised screen adaptation since David Lynch took on the challenging task in the ’80s. Arrival director Denis Villeneuve is the perfect fit to adapt the famous book, and the film stars highly notable actors such as Timothee Chalamet as Paul Atreides, alongside Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Jason Momoa, Javier Bardem, and fan favorite Zendaya.

 

 

the invisible man by h.g wells

image via geeky gadgets

The talented Elisabeth Moss stars in the modern adaptation of this classic H.G. Wells novel. This version, a psychological horror film written and directed by Leigh Whannell, is a loose take on the Wells book, as the story focuses on a woman who, after her ex supposedly dies by suicide, thinks she is being hunted by someone invisible. The movie is out on February 28, and we can’t wait for this thrill ride!

 

 

emma by jane austen

image via austenprose

Regardless of how the late Jane Austen might feel, fan-favorite Emma is hitting the theaters on February 21, so all Austen lovers can rejoice! The book was also adapted in 1996 in the Douglas McGrath directed film starring Gwyneth Patlrow, but it’s been 24 years since its release, so it’s time for a remake, right? The new version, directed by Autumn de Wilde, features Anya Taylor-Joy in the lead role as our favorite matchmaker and Bill Nighy stars as Mr. Woodhouse and Johnny Flynn is George Knightley.

 

 

the woman in the window by a.j finn

image via fox

Another great thriller on our list is The Woman In the Window by A.J Finn, coming to theaters in May 15 and starring Amy Adams, directed by Joe Wright. In this film, an agoraphobic woman drinks wine all day and spies on her neighbors. Nothing bad can happen from that, right? And if you’re like us and can’t wait until summer to find out, you could read the book right now – the choice is yours!

 

 

the secret garden by frances hodgson burnett

image via the silver petticoat

This classic tale from 1911 is about to become a feature film for the fourth time, and will be released on April 17, 2020! The film stars Colin Firth and Dixie Egerickx as the child protagonist, and is directed by Marc Munden. If you want, you can read the book, and watch all the adaptations before the latest movie comes to screen!

 

 

the voyages of dr. dolittle by hugh lofting

image via deadline

The second of the Doctor Dolittle novels has finally been adapted into a movie starring Robert Downey Jr. as the eccentric physician who finds out he can talk to animals. The film is simply called Dolittle and stars a number of prolific, diverse actors and comes out January 17, which gives us just about enough time to cram the book to judge if the movie does the famous book justice!

 

If this list doesn’t keep you up at night, I don’t know what will, because we here at Bookstr take film adaptations seriously and like to see for ourselves if the book actually was better than the film, or not!

 

Featured image via Bibliophile

 


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5 Fantasy Books Coming Out This Month

With the winter holidays upon us and with snow storms brewing, what better way is there to spend a snow day than curled up somewhere warm with a fantasy book? See Tor’s New Release page for more details on some of the following releases!

Here are five fantasy books that will be released this month:

1. “Walk the wild with me”

 

image via Penguin Random house

Written by Rachel Atwood, Walk the Wild With Me is a historical fantasy that follows a young man named Nicholas Withybeck, who must use the power he was granted by a Celtic goddess to infiltrate the realm of the Faery on a rescue mission. But time is running out!

During his travels, he meets mythical figures like Little John and the Green Man, to name but a few. Other fantastical creatures also appear in this narrative: trolls and dryads, for example.

2. “The Light of all that falls”

image via amazon

This is the third book in James Islington‘s Licanius Trilogy. The Light of All The Falls will be released on December 10th. This narrative follows the first two entries in the series The Shadow of What Was Lost and An Echo of Things to Come. Follow Wirr, Davian, and Caeden as they work to overcome their personal demons while trying to restore peace to a war-torn land.

3. “This will kill that”

Image via goodreads

Written by Danielle K. Roux, this book is a distinctive blend of the science fiction and fantasy genres. This Will Kill That is a story that deals with demons and spirits in a city where people regularly murder one another without provocation. Rin Morana is set to take over as the leader of the Green faction, one of the forces behind the Color Clash. Amaya Verity, part of the rival Blue faction, must call on Rin for help. As stated by the Amazon summary of this book, Rin and Amaya must “decide whether to fight monsters or become them.”

4. “The case of the Spellbound child”

image via amazon

This book is the fourteenth installment in Mercedes Lackey‘s Elemental Masters series. But fear not! These books can be read out of order, and readers can still enjoy each for its individual merit. The Case of The Spellbound Child takes place after the death of Sherlock Holmes (but is he? Is he really?). John and Mary Watson and friends embark on two cases in Dartmoor: one involves the disappearance of a group of children on the moors, and the other investigates rumors of dark magic brewing in the region.

5. “Crownbreaker”

image via goodreads

Sebastien de Castell‘s Spellslinger series continues with its sixth installment, Crownbreaker. This book follows protagonists Kellen and Reichis as they adapt to their lives as guardians of the queen. However, everything goes wrong when Kellen is trapped by a mage who intends on killing him.

Featured Image via In the Groove

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Five Fiery Hunger Games Memes

Oh the Hunger Games. Truly the best of the pack from the dystopian craze, at least in my opinion. It had everything. Fire, social commentary, death, crazy outfits. More movies than you can count. It’s been a while, but I know we’re still hype, and the second Mockingjay movie came out four years ago today, so let’s open some old wounds and have some laughs.

 

I’m Just Saying

Image via BeFunky

Look. If we were married, we would live in the same place, and therefore we’d have tons of time to work on the project. Just smart thinking, right? The only group project anyone ever wants to do. Yeah, this part of the story was insanely depressing, but don’t we all sometimes feel like we’re tap dancing just a few inches ahead of death? Just me? And if you’re asking someone to marry you in literally any other situation, you need to look happier about it. Just a tip.

 

No Games

Image via iStalker

The Hunger Games didn’t invent killing all your characters and breaking everyone’s hearts. If anything, The Hunger Games was more metal about it, because those books were directed at a younger audience. I mean, maybe younger people thank I think watch GOT, but the audience for this was potentially young. I was a teenager when the last book came out, probably, but imagine reading it and being Prue’s age, younger. Rooting for her. Too soon?

 

Advice vs. Execution

Image via MemeDroid

If it ain’t me. He’s just lucky he didn’t fall over. I know the act natural trope is crazy overused, but I just can’t be mad when it’s always so funny. As someone who’s never succeeded at seeming unbothered in my life, I can just relate on a really deep level. Sure, I’ve never gotten to the point of wearing a white suit about it, but I did once back into a table and fall over trying to act calm and professional. That might just be a me thing. Peeta does look awkward, though. Maybe because that collar’s clearly stabbing him.

 

Why?

Image via Instagyou

Look, I like to think I’d say to hell with the capital too, but at the same time, cushy job, probably some crazy hats, literally more food than you can eat… Sure, it worked out for him, but he really rolled the dice, didn’t he? For most of the rebellion it was like, hmm, do we fight or do we accept death? They could only profit. Maybe he saw an opportunity, maybe he was just a really good dude deep down, but his character really shows you the limits of first person narrative.

 

So Punny

 
Image via Pinterest

*air horn sound* Alright, it’s probably not that funny. I just love it when people laugh really hard and I don’t get it like that. Look at the reaction image! Is it that funny to someone? Is it ironic laughter? Either way I’m amused. I also have a bunch of questions about snow. He was basically omnipotent, and he couldn’t make that work for him. For all he seemed clever in the books, I really don’t know how he let himself get killed by an excited crowd. What a fall from grace.

Featured image via QuickMeme

Three Books About Aliens and #ThingsWeAreNeverMeantToKnow

Alright, so I don’t really think there’s stuff we’re not meant to know – vive la science! – but a lot of people were talking about aliens (and Monty Python – Twitter, never change), so here are some books about aliens to start knowing some things. Maybe. The truth is out there!

Cinder – Marissa Meyer

This is a great start for anyone who likes their sci-fi light and lush, with enough cyborgs, psychics, and space travel to satisfy more die-hard fans. Set in futuristic Beijing, this well wrought fairy tale retelling features plague, sisterhood, and a robot who’ll be your favorite character. What more could you want? Crime? Formal wear? A lost foot? All that and more, plus, your book hangover will be delayed for quite a while, because there are several excellent sequels and a delightful graphic novel companion series. And did I mention Cinder is a mechanic? She’s a mechanic. Heart eyes.

 

These Broken Stars – Amie Kaufman, Meagan Spooner

Quick question – are you ready to suffer? This is a good book, maybe even a great one, but it’s going to break your entire heart and not even be sorry. Two strangers, the only survivors of a massive spaceliner crash, try to find their way across an alien landscape to the ship’s wreckage and hope of rescue. An unlikely pair, an heiress and a former soldier must work together not only to survive harsh conditions on dwindling hope, but to discover the secrets of this planet, long hidden, and more lovely and terrible than they could have imagined. Like I said, this one’ll hurt, but read it anyway. It’s earned.

 

Binti – Nnedi Okorafor

Confession; this one’s from my TBR. But it’s at the top of the list! Brutal, large scale war against terrifying aliens, an intergalactic university, and the terrible pull of leaving the Earth behind. Clocking in at under a hundred pages, this is definitely a quick read, but don’t worry about being abandoned – it’s the first of three novellas. Plus, we always, always stan a heroine who’s good at math. Isn’t that the dream? Be good at math, and risk death to go to space school? Don’t boo me, I’m right.

Images via Amazon

Featured image via DevantArt