Tag: fiction

5 Books Inspired by Norse Mythology

Norse mythology is definitely a favorite for many people, and I think we can see why. We have some fantastic deities, like Loki and Thor, who have appeared in comic book serializations for decades now. We have myths that are hilarious enough to hold our attentions. I’m thinking of the Mead of Poetry in particular (a myth that Neil Gaiman retells in his book Norse Mythology). Frankly, these are myths that draw us in because of how epic and enthralling they are in their scope and storytelling. We have warrior gods and goddesses, jötunns, elves, and dwarves – to name but a few.

So it’s only natural then that some authors would refer back to this mythos for inspiration.

Here are five books inspired by Norse mythology.

 

 

 

1. The gospel of loki

 

image via goodreads

Written by Joanne M. Harris, this is the first book in her Loki series which, you guessed it, follows Loki, the trickster god. If anyone is interested, Harris also has a book series simply called Runemarks, which plays with Norse mythology and retells it in a fun, modernized way. The Gospel of Loki retells how the trickster god was recruited by Odin and how he is treated by the other Asgardians. Plus, to make this story even more appealing, it is told from Loki’s sarcastic, snarky point of view.

 

2. Hilda and the troll

 

image via goodreads

You might be familiar with the Netflix adaptation of this adorable graphic novel. Written and illustrated by Luke Pearson, Hilda and The Troll follows Hilda, a young girl who loves to explore and befriend mythical creatures with some distinct Norse roots. She eventually moves to Trollberg, a human city, with her mother, but her adventures only continue in the cityscape with her new friends. The artwork is beautiful and the story is absolutely endearing. While this series is definitely geared towards younger audiences, I am of the mind that all ages can enjoy it. After all, there are little elves, trolls, moving mountains, talking crows, and so much more.

 

3. The Long dark tea-time of the soul

 

image via goodreads

Typically, I try to keep most of the books on lists like these to more recent publications that may not have gotten a great deal of attention. However, Douglas Adams (author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy) is one of those writers who definitely needs a place on this list. This is the second book in Adams’ Dirk Gently series, which has also recently been adapted into a television series. Dirk Gently is a detective who doesn’t just handle the possible, but also the impossible and improbable. In The Long Dark Tea-Time of The Soul, it comes to Dirk’s attention that a passenger check-in desk at Heathrow airport has disappeared into a ball of light. This is being perceived as an act of god, but this then begs the question: which god?

 

 

4. Hammered

 

image via goodreads

Just to preface, this is the third book in Kevin Hearne‘s Iron Druid series. There are several novels and novellas, and this series is most certainly the gift that keeps on giving in my not-so-humble opinion. These stories follow Atticus O’Sullivan, the last druid who has relocated to Arizona where he runs a bookshop and sells magic teas. Hammered portrays Thor, the god of thunder, as a bully who has ruined lives and killed many. Now, Atticus’ vampire viking friend, Leif Helgarson, enlists the druid to help him get revenge on Thor. This story involves an army of frost giants and battle with the forces of Asgard… with plenty of other pantheons and other mythologies joining the fray.

 

5. the blood-tainted winter

 

image via goodreads

Written by T.L. GreylockThe Blood-Tainted Winter follows Raef Skallagrim, a man who wants to set sail on the ocean, following the sea road. He and his crew wish to be famous and recognized by the gods themselves. Yet Raef’s father and an impending war make it so that Raef must set his dream to the side and answer the call of duty. He must learn to navigate the tides of war while also seeking out revenge. Yet in the end, this will be a war that affects even the gods. This is the first book in The Song of The Ash Tree series.

 

 

Featured image via Deposit Photos


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Explore Audible’s Top Picks of 2019

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that reading doesn’t always have to be you, a book and a comfy seat. More so than ever before, people are listening to their literature on laptops, on smartphones, and on the go. Audible is the best option for this, as it’s available across plenty of devices with a wide range of titles.

Audible has released a map that takes a look at 2019 listening data to see which titles were “more uniquely popular in some states compared to the rest of the country”. Our map below shows each state’s top Audible titles from 2019.

 

 

The shortest route across the US in a car would take four days or ninety-six hours. Forget about your killer soundtrack and instead, think about how many audiobooks you could get through in that time! If you wanted to do it properly, you could go state-by-state and take on each state’s favorite audiobook as you move. Luckily, Audible and Bookstr are here to help. The above infographic shows us which audiobook has been most popular (i.e. listened to more than any other) in each US state.

Let’s take a closer look.

 

Northwest

 

Midwest

 

Southwest

 

Southeast

 

Northeast

 

 

One thing is for sure, self-help is popular country-wide, with many states learning how to Stay Sexy, set Atomic Habits and Not Give a F*ck. George R.R. Martin reigns in several states, proving himself King of The North(east). Fiction and non-fiction are popular all over the country, with fantasy and celebrity novels not contained to any one region.

 

 

Now that you have all you need for a literary road trip across the United States, fill up the tank, download Audible and get moving. Happy listening!

Here are the titles by state:

Maine The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton

Maryland  The Woman in The Window by A.J. Finn

New Hampshire The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Vermont City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert

Virginia Call Sign Chaos by Jim Mattis, Bing West

Massachusetts Summer of ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand

New York Principles by Ray Dalio

Pennsylvania The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson

Connecticut Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Delaware Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

Ohio Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

Rhode Island Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty

Kentucky Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness

West Virginia Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Tennessee The Road Back to You by Ian Morgan Cron, Suzanne Stabile

Indiana Shortest Way Home by Pete Buttigieg

Illinois Life Will Be the Death of Me by Chelsea Handler

Iowa Take Control of Your Life by Mel Robbins

Missouri The Institute by Stephen King

Oklahoma Killers of The Flower Moon by David Grann

Kansas A Clash of Kings by George R.R. Martin

Nebraska #IMOMSOHARD by Kristen Hensley, Jen Smedley

South Dakota Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis

Wyoming Wolf Pack by C.J. Box

Colorado Dare to Lead by Brené Brown

Utah Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling

Nevada Unf*ck Yourself by Gary John Bishop

Arkansas Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate

Mississippi Cemetery Road by Greg Iles

Alabama It’s Not Supposed To Be This Way by Lysa Terkeurst

Florida How To Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie

Georgia 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene

North Carolina Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

Michigan A Storm of Swords by George R.R. Martin

Wisconsin Heads Will Roll by Kate McKinnon, Emily Lynne

North Dakota Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis

Montana The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

Washington Dune by Frank Herbert

Oregon Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered by Karen Kilgarrif, Georgia Hardstark

California Never Split The Difference by Chris Voss

Arizona The Dichotomy of Leadership by Jocko Willink, Leif Babin

New Mexico Stan Lee’s Alliances: A Trick of Light by Stan Lee, Kat Rosenfield

Hawaii Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins

South Carolina The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen

Minnesota Neon Prey by John Sandford

Idaho Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover

Texas Atomic Habits by James Clear

Alaska Good Omens by Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett

Louisiana A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

New Jersey Unfreedom of The Press by Mark R. Levin

District of Colombia Becoming by Michelle Obama

 

You can explore it even closer below: 

Created by Parisha Patel, who you can find here and here.

lite blue-book map

All images via PARIsha patel


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5 Fantasy Books Set for Release This Month

As the new year dawns, so too does another year of books. While I can’t give you all of the releases for this coming year, I can provide you with a list of five fantasy books that are set for release this month. After all, is there a better way to start the new year than with a book hot off the printing press? For more fantasy books set for release this month, check out Tor’s article!

Here are 5 books that are set to be released this month.

 

 

1. “Dark and deepest Red”

Image via goodreads

Written by Anne-Marie McLemore, Dark and Deepest Red is set to be released by the time of this article’s publication. The book’s Goodreads page provides this summary of the story,

“Summer, 1518. A strange sickness sweeps through Strasbourg: women dance in the streets, some until they fall down dead. As rumors of witchcraft spread, suspicion turns toward Lavinia and her family, and Lavinia may have to do the unimaginable to save herself and everyone she loves. Five centuries later, a pair of red shoes seal to Rosella Oliva’s feet, making her dance uncontrollably. They draw her toward a boy who knows the dancing fever’s history better than anyone: Emil, whose family was blamed for the fever five hundred years ago. But there’s more to what happened in 1518 than even Emil knows, and discovering the truth may decide whether Rosella survives the red shoes.”

This story is definitely borrowing inspiration from Han Christian Anderson’s fairy tale “The Red Shoes,” which, based on the version one reads, has a very grisly ending. All I know is that I, personally, will be grabbing up a copy of this book.

 

 

2. “Infinity son”

image via goodreads

Infinity Son, the first book in Adam Silvera‘s Infinity Cycle is set for release this month. The book’s Goodreads page provides the following description:

“Growing up in New York, brothers Emil and Brighton always idolized the Spell Walkers—a vigilante group sworn to rid the world of specters. While the Spell Walkers and other celestials are born with powers, specters take them, violently stealing the essence of endangered magical creatures. Brighton wishes he had a power so he could join the fray. Emil just wants the fighting to stop. The cycle of violence has taken a toll, making it harder for anyone with a power to live peacefully and openly. In this climate of fear, a gang of specters has been growing bolder by the day.”

This is definitely worth a read.

 

 

3. “A Queen in Hiding”

image via goodreads

Sarah Kozloff’s debut novel A Queen in Hiding will be released in the third week of January, and it sounds fascinating. Goodreads provides the following book description:

Orphaned, exiled and hunted, Cérulia, Princess of Weirandale, must master the magic that is her birthright, become a ruthless guerilla fighter, and transform into the queen she is destined to be. But to do it she must win the favor of the spirits who play in mortal affairs, assemble an unlikely group of rebels, and wrest the throne from a corrupt aristocracy whose rot has spread throughout her kingdom.”

Who doesn’t love a story about a queen regaining her throne?

 

 

 

4. “The Bard’s Blade”

image via goodreads

The Bard’s Blade, the first book Brian D. Anderson‘s series The Sorcerer’s Song will also be released in the third week of January. Here is an excerpt from the book summary:

“Mariyah enjoys a simple life in Vylari, a land magically sealed off from the outside world, where fear and hatred are all but unknown. There she’s a renowned wine maker and her betrothed, Lem, is a musician of rare talent. Their destiny has never been in question. Whatever life brings, they will face it together. But destiny has a way of choosing its own path, and when a stranger crosses the wards into Vylari for the first time in centuries, the two are faced with a terrible prophecy. For beyond the borders, an ancient evil is returning, its age-old prison shattered.”

 

 

5. “Nottingham: The true story of robyn hood”

image via goodreads

Nottingham: The True Story of Robyn Hood is set for release this coming week. I’ll admit it: I’m a huge sucker when it comes to Robin Hood. I love the stories and the legends, and I want to eventually visit Sherwood Forest. This is definitely a book worth checking out, because Anna Burke creates a very interesting take on an old legend. The book’s Goodreads summary states,

“Robyn Hood didn’t set out to rob the rich, but in Nottingham, nothing ever goes according to plan…. After a fateful hunting accident sends her on the run from the law, Robyn finds herself deep in the heart of Sherwood Forest. All she really wants to do is provide for her family and stay out of trouble, but when the Sheriff of Nottingham levies the largest tax in the history of England, she’s forced to take matters into her own hands. Relying on the help of her band of merry women and the Sheriff’s intriguing—and off limits—daughter, Marian, Robyn must find a way to pull off the biggest heist Sherwood has ever seen.”

Featured image via Amazon

 


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Books to Read Before They Become Movies

If you’re a book lover, then your favorite thing to say is probably “Oh, the book was SO much better than the movie!” and we don’t disagree, because it probably was! So before these awesome tales turn into movies in the new year, make sure you snag a few so you can spit out the same line when the adaptations come out!

 

p.s I still love you by jenny han

image via trending news buzz

This is the ever anticipated sequel to the famous YA book and later Netflix film, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before by author Jenny Han, and it will be available to stream on February 12, just two days before Valentines Day! This story is said to focus on Lara Jean’s new relationship with Peter Kavinsky. But this is a high school romance movie, so it’s required to feature a love triangle, and you bet it does!

 

 

dune by frank herbert

Image Via Dread central

Frank Herbert’s sci-fi masterpiece Dune, is getting its long promised screen adaptation since David Lynch took on the challenging task in the ’80s. Arrival director Denis Villeneuve is the perfect fit to adapt the famous book, and the film stars highly notable actors such as Timothee Chalamet as Paul Atreides, alongside Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Jason Momoa, Javier Bardem, and fan favorite Zendaya.

 

 

the invisible man by h.g wells

image via geeky gadgets

The talented Elisabeth Moss stars in the modern adaptation of this classic H.G. Wells novel. This version, a psychological horror film written and directed by Leigh Whannell, is a loose take on the Wells book, as the story focuses on a woman who, after her ex supposedly dies by suicide, thinks she is being hunted by someone invisible. The movie is out on February 28, and we can’t wait for this thrill ride!

 

 

emma by jane austen

image via austenprose

Regardless of how the late Jane Austen might feel, fan-favorite Emma is hitting the theaters on February 21, so all Austen lovers can rejoice! The book was also adapted in 1996 in the Douglas McGrath directed film starring Gwyneth Patlrow, but it’s been 24 years since its release, so it’s time for a remake, right? The new version, directed by Autumn de Wilde, features Anya Taylor-Joy in the lead role as our favorite matchmaker and Bill Nighy stars as Mr. Woodhouse and Johnny Flynn is George Knightley.

 

 

the woman in the window by a.j finn

image via fox

Another great thriller on our list is The Woman In the Window by A.J Finn, coming to theaters in May 15 and starring Amy Adams, directed by Joe Wright. In this film, an agoraphobic woman drinks wine all day and spies on her neighbors. Nothing bad can happen from that, right? And if you’re like us and can’t wait until summer to find out, you could read the book right now – the choice is yours!

 

 

the secret garden by frances hodgson burnett

image via the silver petticoat

This classic tale from 1911 is about to become a feature film for the fourth time, and will be released on April 17, 2020! The film stars Colin Firth and Dixie Egerickx as the child protagonist, and is directed by Marc Munden. If you want, you can read the book, and watch all the adaptations before the latest movie comes to screen!

 

 

the voyages of dr. dolittle by hugh lofting

image via deadline

The second of the Doctor Dolittle novels has finally been adapted into a movie starring Robert Downey Jr. as the eccentric physician who finds out he can talk to animals. The film is simply called Dolittle and stars a number of prolific, diverse actors and comes out January 17, which gives us just about enough time to cram the book to judge if the movie does the famous book justice!

 

If this list doesn’t keep you up at night, I don’t know what will, because we here at Bookstr take film adaptations seriously and like to see for ourselves if the book actually was better than the film, or not!

 

Featured image via Bibliophile

 


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5 ‘The Witcher’ Memes to Feast Your Eyes On

Now that the The Witcher has dropped on Netflix, fans have been busy putting together memes to share on the internet. And, naturally, a ton of these are hilarious.

While I can’t unearth every single meme that this franchise has inspired, I can most certainly share a few of the ones that I felt hit their mark. Here are five Witcher memes to peruse and enjoy!

 

 

1.

image via tumblr

Regardless of if you want to be held by book Geralt, game Geralt, or Henry Cavill’s Geralt, I think this meme sums up a hidden mutual longing that we all possess. Need I say more?

 

 

2.

image via know your meme

This is a fun take on the meme of the woman yelling at the cat. We all know that Jaskier (Dandelion) drives Geralt up a wall, and in the Netflix adaptation, we got to see that at full force. This meme definitely conjures up memories of episode 6. Typically, this meme has bolded text above it explaining why the encounter is even taking place, but I couldn’t resist sharing it as it was.

 

 

 

3.

image via youtube

This meme has circulated the internet quite a bit already, but I still think it’s absolutely fantastic. Did I binge the entire season in one day? Yes. Yes I did. Did I put off my responsibilities? Yes. Did my family wonder why I had gone awfully quiet all of a sudden? Yes. Do I regret it? Nah.

 

 

4.

image via Tv and movie news

We all know the song at this point, now don’t we? We all know the word play at work here. Am I going to go listen to the song on repeat for an hour? Ha. Try three. Go big or go home.

 

 

 

5.

image via reddit

If I have to live with the reality that the next season is coming out in 2021, then so does everyone else! While I didn’t share this meme primarily out of spite, I did share it because I think most fans had a similar emotional response after a long binge. Fans of the adaptation will have to, indeed, wait until 2021 before the second season drops. So what should we do in the meantime? Well, crying is a pretty good option. Rereading the books is there too. I’m on my second watch of the Netflix series at the moment, so not all hope is lost.

 

Featured image via Reddit


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