Tag: bookstore

Barnes & Noble Closing Over 400 Stores

Hey readers!  As we’ve come to know, books are ever more important now that we’re home-bound.  Maybe we’re not going out to book stores, but for those of you who are, Barnes & Noble is temporarily closing over 400 of their 627 U.S. stores in response to the coronavirus pandemic.  Now, now, don’t panic.  Luckily for us, it’s just a temporary closure, but it still doesn’t feel good knowing that book stores are closing indefinitely.

 

image via the telegraph

 

A letter was sent to Barnes & Noble’s 23k+ employees on March 17 before the mass closure.  In it, CEO James Daunt warned, “with the closure of stores, we are obliged to make the hardest of choices,” citing that the company unfortunately doesn’t have the necessary resources to give paid leave to their employees as larger companies like Apple, Nike, or Microsoft, are able to.  He continues, “This is a devastating situation in which to find ourselves and we understand the personal impacts of such action.”

 

 

Daunt stated that as stores closed, people with less than six months of employment would be laid off.  Those that have been with the company longer than six months will be asked to used available paid time off, and those that have been with the company for over a year can receive up to two weeks of additional pay!

 

image via michael kozlowski on goodereader

 

Daunt states that “when a store is permitted to reopen, we will do so, and we intend to rehire.”  The mass closures most likely has to do with the social distancing measure that are being pushed very hard lately in an effort to slow down the coronavirus.

 

 

CEO James Daunt didn’t say anything about their website also being affected by the coronavirus, so that remains a viable option for those of you who want to get your hands on some books to read while you’re stuck at home.  As we push out more book content, we’re sure you’ll get lots of ideas on what to read.

 

featured image via usa Today

 

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Liked Blind Date With A Book? You’ll Love This

So you want some books but need to social distance, eh?  Well, if you are a Washington resident, you can get a big ol’ ‘mystery bag of books.’ An email from a customer recently asked Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C. if they could request books via emails. The co-owner, Kyle Burk, liked the idea, and is now expanding the concept to the whole reading community.

 

 

The way this system will work is you start by emailing the store, explain what genres you’re interested in and then pay any amount you wish – it can be $15, $50, or even $100 if you’re on a home-bound book binge quest.  So far, the bookstore has received 150 requests for the ‘mystery book bags.’

 

Burk and his friends have worked at Capitol Hill Books part-time, on and off, for the past 15 years.  It has become an important space for them.  Burk said that when he bought it two years ago, he had the idea of the place being a space for friends to hang out and becoming a home.  Most of their traffic does come from foot traffic, especially on weekends with a nearby farmer’s market.

 

image via bookstore explorer

 

Although nonessential businesses aren’t shut down yet in Washington, D.C., Capitol Hill Books voluntarily shut its doors to the public over a week ago and now offers hourly appointments for those who want to browse their collection.  With social distancing in mind, the store is allowing four or fewer people into the store during these hour-long appointments, where they’ll be greeted by employees with hand sanitizer and gloves.  This new idea, in addition to the mystery book bags, has kept the store pretty busy and booked.

 

 

image via Capitol Hill books on twitter

 

With the coronavirus pandemic changing the way small business are operating, Burk encourages people who want to continue to support their favorite businesses continue to do so.  This model is what has kept the bookstore open since the early 1990’s.  It’s certainly wonderful to see a small business adapt to change and allow people to continue reading from this bookstore.

 

featured image via lwyang on flickr

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Amid Pandemic, Libro.fm and Bookshop.org Sales Skyrocket

Amid the current coronavirus pandemic, many people have chosen to self-quarantine and practice social distancing in efforts to stop the spread. This leaves many with newfound free time on their hands and the challenge of finding ways to entertain themselves while quarantining at home. In this quest, many have turned to reading to fill their spare time and rather than go to a bookstore to acquire these books, they can be found entirely online. 

 

Audio-bookstore, Libro.fm, and online bookstore, Bookshop.org have both seen sales skyrocket, as a result of the recent coronavirus pandemic. Both online stores collaborate with independent booksellers and return a share of sales back to them. This is in an effort to keep independent bookstores alive, especially during this time of social distancing. CEO and co-founder of Libro.fm, Mark Pearson, notes that “it has been a record breaking month for sales and new memberships.” Compared to the previous month, Pearson notes that sales for the thirty day period, which ended on March 15, were up about 150%. 

 

image via grinnell college

 

Libro.fm, which is based in Seattle, had already noticed the hit to independent bookstores in their community. In a radical move, the company altered their business model “so that affiliate bookstores get all the revenue from new membership sales until the end of the month.” Pearson notes the importance of independent booksellers stating, “if independent bookstores go under, we don’t exist.” This important measure reminds people of the value of their own community. 

 

Similarly, Bookshop.org has seen a sudden increase in the amount of bookstores signing up as affiliates. Founder Andy Hunter says, “A lot of stores opened accounts recently as an emergency measure in case they need to close up shop.” Until then, they are able to fulfill the web orders from their own shops. Bookshop.org has also seen a giant increase in sales as the coronavirus pandemic has escalated. Over the last four days, the online shop has seen a 400% increase in sales as social distancing and self-quarantining have become a widespread practice. 

 

image via venngage

While companies like Libro.fm and Bookshop.org have solved a number of societal problems during this ambiguous and secluded time, that doesn’t mean they don’t feel pressure to meet customer demands. Developers feel the pressure to make site improvements faster, and without error. For now, Hunter says that, so long as our servers stay up – we’ve checked them, and they are good – we’ll be here for bookstores.” 

Stay safe and happy reading!

 

Featured Image via Fine Art America

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Strand is Coming to the Upper West Side!

If you’re a New Yorker that loves books than you know what a landmark the Strand Bookstore is. The store opened in 1927 on a fourth avenue block, then called Book Row, which held forty-eight bookstores. The owner and creator, Ben Bass, was only twenty-five when he started the store. He wanted the store to be a place where book lovers and writers could come together, so he named the store after the street in London where writers such like Dickens went to gather. It was in Greenwich Village and at first it was place for writers to sell their books, and then in 1957 it moved to it’s current location on 12th Street and Broadway.

Image result for strand bookstore inside
Image via NY Times

Now Strand also sells merchandise such as journals, socks, pens, bags, shirts, etc. Of course they also sell books, new, used, and old, or in other words, classics. The other Strand locations are the kiosks in Time Square and in Central Park. However, next month Strand will be expanding to the Upper West Side, Columbus Ave between 81st and 82nd street.

The store that used to be in that location was Book Culture, but due to a dispute between John MacArthur, who is the president of Harper Magazine, and Chris Doeblin, who is the primary owner of the New York Times, the store closed, and now Strand will occupy the location. The store will be called the Strand on Columbus Avenue, and of course book loving New Yorkers are excited to see this new location. Out of the forty-eight bookstores that were on book row, Strand is the only one that still stands. Strand is here to stay.


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Featured image via Real Deal 

Quiz – Which Bookstore Cat Are You?

Check out which furry scholar you are!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Featured image via San Jose