The Elephant In The Room That No One Talks About In These Books

Some books have inconsistencies or mistakes that we just can’t seem to understand, yet they aren’t talked about. One might even call them an “elephant in the room.”

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Let’s look at three different popular book series that each have a very large elephant in the room, metaphorically of course.

Peeta’s Camouflage in The Hunger Games

Peeta camouflaged in the rocks.
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We all know that Peeta Mellark is an excellent baker with extraordinary cake decorating skills. But would that really translate into him being able to camouflage and conceal himself so perfectly while he was in the Hunger Games? I mean, you’re telling me that he had a sword wound in his leg the size of a newborn elephant (okay, maybe not that big) and he was still able to crawl to the nearest rocks, pull out his Capitol Camouflage Kit™, and completely disguise himself as part of the landscape? Peeta may have been talented, but I’m not buying it. 

Blackjack in Percy Jackson and the Olympians

Percy Jackson's horse Blackjack.
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Every Percy Jackson fan would be able to tell you who Blackjack is. He is Percy’s loyal pegasus who saves Percy’s skin quite a few times throughout the series. What they might not all remember is that Blackjack was first introduced in The Sea of Monsters as a mare– a female horse. For the rest of the series, Blackjack is a male. Now, Rick Riordan has confirmed that this important detail was simply a mistake, and I suppose we can forgive him for it, since he has given us so many amazing books. Still, it is pretty odd that no one caught this before The Titan’s Curse was released.

The Vampires in Twilight

Cullen siblings in school.
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One aspect of Twilight that I could never wrap my head around was how no one ever thought anything more about the Cullens than that they were “weird” and that they thought they were better than everyone else. Until Bella came along, no one questioned why they were deathly pale. No one ever happened to shake their hands or brush past them at school and feel that they were as hard as marble and cold as ice. No one, except for Bella, noticed the regular change in eye color.  I personally just don’t think all of that sounds very believable. The people in forks couldn’t have been that unobservant, could they? Sounds like a pretty large elephant in the room to me.

Many books have inconsistencies that the authors like to brush over, but here at Bookstr, we notice everything! 

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