Tag: margaret atwood

#Bookstagrammer of the Week: @bookpairings

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This Week’s Featured creator: @bookpairings

 

Each week Bookstr is going to be highlighting your favorite Bookstagrammers. A Bookstagrammer is someone who shares all of their literary interests, ranging from book reviews and aesthetically pleasing book pictures to outfit pictures featuring their current reads. Anything that evokes bibliophile feels is on their Instagram pages. Make sure to give these Bookstagrammers the love they deserve! This week we are getting to know a Bookstagrammer with a passion for books and indie bookshops: Laci, or as you would know her on Instagram, @bookpairings.

Here is her story:

 

image via @bookpairings

 

Chapter 1: The Birth of a Bookstagram Account

 

 

Laci started Bookstagram as a fun project to cope with a difficult period in her life, and her account took off from there.

 

I started posting “Bookstagram” posts on my personal account during the summer of 2015 when I was recovering from my second brain surgery in 6 months. I have always loved reading and when I found a community of book lovers at my fingertips I decided I wanted to join the conversation. 

Because I’m the type of person who needs a project, even when I should be resting, I decided I would create my own Bookstagram account and see how it goes. That was in August of 2015 and it’s crazy to think I have posted almost everyday since then and 41K+ people care about my opinions of books and enjoy my very eclectic reading recommendations. 

 

Laci usually reads over 100 books a year, but her favorite books include classic reads such as:

As well as some more contemporary books like:

 

 

If given the choice, Laci would take a selfie with Margaret Atwood, her favorite author.

 

image via @bookpairings

 

Laci is a part of the Harry Potter, The Night Circus, Game of Thrones, and Good Omens fandoms.

 

Besides being book-obsessed, she also loves wine tasting.

I almost went through the training and testing to become a sommelier. I am a total oenophile and it’s another thing I love sharing with people. 

 

Chapter 2: To The Bookstagramming

 

Laci’s photography style definitely gives off a very memorable vibe, but how would she define this aesthetic?

When it comes to the photography aspect of my content, I always strive for cozy feeling photos with warm tones. I like to find interesting textures and angles so I am constantly experimenting.

I love to play with woodgrain and books for texture and I love using shadow for moodier photos.

 

 

She also has some photography advice for new Bookstagrammers.

In terms of photography, play around and you’ll improve post by post. You’ll find your aesthetic faster if you experiment and reflect on why you love certain photos.

 

Laci sticks to a specific posting schedule, so you’ll always know when to look for her newest bookish photos.

I generally post every morning between 7am-8am PST during the week and on the weekends I either post around 12pm or 5pm. I’ve done a lot of experimenting to find the optimal time for engagement, but it also depends a little bit on my schedule. I want to be able to respond to every single comment on my posts, so I try to post when I know I will be able to check-in periodically to reply. 

 

image via @bookpairings

 

So what are Laci’s personal favorite Bookstagram accounts?

It’s too hard to choose just a few! Here are some of my favorites:

@ouija.doodle.reads 

@theliteraryheroine

@fictionmatters

@booknerdnative

@worldswithinpages

@michellereadsbooks

@thebookishfiiasco

@jennareadsbooks

@booklanguage

@booksonherbrain

@somekindoflibrary

@absorbedinpages

I could go on and on.

 

 

Chapter 3: What does bookstagram mean to you?

 

It’s clear that Laci is very involved in the Bookstagram community, so what does her Bookstagram mean to her personally?

I am still stunned that my account has garnered as many followers as it has. I know that I work hard on each post behind the scenes, but I continue to be humbled by the Bookstagram community. To me my page is a place where I can share my love of books with other amazing, supportive book lovers. I feel like I have grown a lot personally since I started and I am lucky to have made some amazing friends within the community as well. 

I strive for authenticity when creating my content above all else. I want to share the books I am genuinely interested in reading and the books I love even if they aren’t the most hyped. I still get sucked into the new releases hype from time to time, but I’d like to think I also get less well-known or well-marketed books on the radar of my followers.

I hope that my Bookstagram inspires people to read outside of their comfort zones.

 

 

image via @bookpairings

 

Her final word to fellow Bookstagrammers and book lovers?

Support your local libraries and indie bookstores when you can. They provide so many services to their communities and it’s becoming harder and harder for them to survive with big business looming.

 

Featured image via @bookpairings

 

 


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Atwood and Evaristo Both Win Booker Prize

The Booker Prize judges “explicitly flouted” the rules of the prize, choosing two winners for the first time in more than 25 years. Margaret Atwood and Bernadine Evaristo. At 79 years old, Atwood is the oldest writer to ever receive the prize. Even more exciting, Bernadine Evaristo is the first black woman to win the Booker Prize since it began in 1969.

 

 

After five hours with the prize’s jury, the judges emerged to announce they had been unable to select just one winner. Even knowing that the prize’s director, Gary Wood, would not allow them to split up the $50,000 prize, the judges chose Atwood The Testaments and Evaristo’s Girl, Woman, Other as joint winners.

 

Images via Amazon

 

The prize has been split twice before – between Nadine Gordimer and Stanley Middleton in 1974, and between Michael Ondaatje and Barry Unsworth in 1992 – but the rules were changed after 1992 to stipulate that the prize “may not be divided or withheld.”

Peter Florence, the chair of the judges, commented that the choice to split the prize was difficult but, in the judges’ opinion, necessary:

 

Our consensus was that it was our decision to flout the rules and divide this year’s prize to celebrate two winners…These are two books we started not wanting to give up and the more we talked about them the more we treasured both of them and wanted them both as winners … We couldn’t separate them.

 

 

After the ceremony at London’s Guildhall, Margaret Atwood said:

 

It would have been quite embarrassing for a person of my age and stage to have won the whole thing and thereby hinder a person in an earlier stage of their career from going through that door. I really would have been embarrassed, trust me on that…I’m not the jury. I have been on a jury that split the prize and I understand the predicament. I get it … they should have split it 13 ways but unfortunately that’s not how it goes.

 

Evaristo also commented on her historic win:

 

I’m just so delighted to have won the prize. Yes, I am sharing it with an amazing writer. But I am not thinking about sharing it, I am thinking about the fact that I am here and that’s an incredible thing considering what the prize has meant to me and my literary life, and the fact that it felt so unattainable for decades.

 

 

Atwood confirmed she would donate her $25,000 share of the prize to the Canadian Indigenous charity Indspire, which she has previously helped with her late friend and First Nations leader Chief Harry St Denis.

Commenting again on the unorthodox choice to have two winners, Florence said:

 

Nobody was taking this lightly but equally there was a sense of perspective – we are judging a book prize, and this is a celebration of great literature. There are opportunities to be joyful here.

 

 

Featured image via Getty Images

Beloved Author Graeme Gibson Passes At 85

Canadian author and conservationist Graeme Gibson passed away on Wednesday, September 18th at the age of 85 due to dementia. The announcement was made by Gibson’s publisher, Penguin Random House Canada.

 

Image Via Georgia Straight

 

Gibson is known for writing experimental fiction novels such as Five Legs and Communion, both centering around the character Felix Oswald and his dark, twisted coming-of-age adventures. An avid bird watcher, Gibson also wrote collections based on his bird watching, his most well-known being The Bedside Book of Birds.

 

 

Gibson was the longtime partner of Margaret Atwood, author of The Handmaid’s Tale and the recently released The Testaments. Even though he was suffering from dementia, he still joined Atwood on her book promotion tour.

In an interview with Time magazine, Atwood said that she wrote The Testaments while caring for Gibson.

 

Image Via Glob Intel

 

Are you sad to hear about Gibson’s death?

 

 

Featured Image Via CBC

 

 

Praise Be! ‘The Testaments’ Is Coming To Television

 

 

Releasing today, Margaret Atwood’s The Testaments continues the story of The Handmaid’s Tale with new characters exploring the world of Gilead for a new generation of readers. With rave reviews and a huge following thanks to the successful series on Hulu, the hype surrounding this new novel has reached new heights. For those fans who are anxious for an eventual adaptation, you don’t have to wait any longer.

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Hulu has confirmed that a series based on The Testaments is in the works, just as the series starts to prepare for it’s upcoming fourth season.

In addition to the new series, the showrunner of Handmaid’s has stated that the show will incorporate elements of The Testaments into the current show.

 

 

MGM, the production company for The Handmaid’s Tale, is more than ready to bring Atwood’s newest story to life:

 

“Margaret Atwood is a literary icon who continues to delight and challenge readers through her provocative and compelling prose. She has been an incredible creative partner and resource to MGM throughout the production of Handmaid’s and we look forward to working with her on the story’s exciting next chapter.”

 

Are you excited for an adaptation of The Testaments?

 

 

Featured Image Via Penguin Books