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Explore the Great Outdoors With the Help of Our Nonfiction Wildlife Picks!

Each week, Bookstr gives you a look at some of the best novels in a particular genre for your continued reading list.

Today, we’ll be recommending five of the best wildlife nonfiction books to give your motivation to explore the natural world!

 

 

5. ‘The Animal Dialogues’ by Craig Childs

 

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The Animal Dialogues by Craig Childs is a thrilling book about the author Craig Childs and his various encounters with grizzly bears, sharks, porcupines, elks, bighorn sheep, and many others. Captured with chilling, intimate descriptions and wry humor, this book is a must read for wildlife fans who want to see tons of varied encounters with dozens of different creatures.

 

4. ‘Field Guide to the natural world of New York City’ by Leslie Day

 

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Field Guide to the Natural World of New York City by Leslie Day showcases the wild world of a place you’d not normally think to look at for diverse wildlife: New York City! The book explores three islands full of different kinds of wildlife at its three rich islands: Manhattan, Long Island, and Staten Island. Written by a real life naturalist, this book sheds light on the real wild side of New York with tips of identifying different animals, plants, and more among the urban sprawl.

 

 

3. ‘Unlikely Friendships’ by Jennifer s. Holland

 

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Unlikely Friendships documents one heartwarming tale after another of animals who, with nothing else in common, bond in the most unexpected ways. A cat and a bird. A mare and a fawn. An elephant and a sheep. A snake and a hamster. The well-documented stories of Koko the gorilla and All Ball the kitten; and the hippo Owen and the tortoise Mzee. And almost inexplicable stories of predators befriending prey—an Indian leopard slips into a village every night to sleep with a calf. A lionness mothers a baby oryx.

Ms. Holland narrates the details and arc of each story, and also offers insights into why—how the young leopard, probably motherless, sought maternal comfort with the calf, and how a baby oryx inspired the same mothering instinct in the lionness. Or, in the story of Kizzy, a nervous retired Greyhound, and Murphy, a red tabby, how cats and dogs actually understand each other’s body language. Your heart will expand at seeing this unlikely friendships come to life.

 

2. ‘Wild Justice’ by Marc Bekoff

 

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Wild Justice by Marc Bekoff tells about the morality animals. Are animals capable of complex emotions such as a understanding of justice?

With this book, the author answers yes and showcases many examples to support their argument: a female Gorilla who mourned the death of her beloved child, a rat who refused to push a lever for food when he saw doing so electrocuted his friend, or a wild elephant who paused to care for a younger one after it was injured. This book shows us that, whether we like it or not, animals are more like us than we think.

 

1. ‘Winter World’ by Bernd Heinrich 

 

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Winter World by Bernd Heinrich is all about how animals survive the harsh winters and the process of hibernation. From flying squirrels to grizzly bears, and from torpid turtles to insects with antifreeze, the animal kingdom relies on some staggering evolutionary innovations to survive winter.

Unlike their human counterparts, who must alter the environment to accommodate physical limitations, animals are adaptable to an amazing range of conditions. Examining everything from food sources in the extremely barren winter land-scape to the chemical composition that allows certain creatures to survive, Heinrich’s Winter World awakens the largely undiscovered mysteries by which nature sustains herself through winter’s harsh, cruel exigencies.

 

 

 

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Improve Your Quality of Life With Our Self-Development Picks!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are self development picks to improve your quality of life! Dig in and enjoy!

 

 

5. ‘Coffee Bean’ by Jon Gordon

 

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The Coffee Bean by Jon Gordon is about dealing with the stresses of life. It can be often harsh, stressful, and the environments we find ourselves in can weaken or harden us. This is an inspiring tale that follows a man called Abe as he faces challenges, pressures, and stresses at school and home.

Abe discovers that instead of letting the environment change him for the worse, he can change the environment around him for the better. Wherever his life can take him, Abe takes it to heart to live life like a coffee bean and transform into something better. Are you an egg, a carrot, or a coffee bean?

 

4. ‘Run The mile you’re in’ by Ryan Hall

 

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Ryan Hall is an Olympic athlete and American record holder in the half marathon (59:43), but in his autobiography, Run The Mile You’re In, he reveals that as kid he hated running. He wanted nothing to do with the sport until one day, he felt compelled to run the 15 miles around his neighborhood lake. He was hooked.

Now a coach, speaker, and nonprofit partner, Ryan shares the powerful faith behind his athletic achievements and the lessons he learned that helped him push past limits, make space for relationships that enrich life on and off the running trails, and cultivate a positive mindset.

 

 

3. ‘Witchery’ by Juliet diaz 

 

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Witches by Juliet Diaz is about connecting with your inner witch and embracing it to make your life healthier. Third generation witch Diaz teaches you how to embrace your inner Magick through casting off what doesn’t make you happy, embracing inner athleticism, and becoming an embodiment of truth. And through it all, you’ll build the knowledge to craft spells of your own.

 

2. ‘I am love’ by Allowah Lani 

 

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I Am Love by Allowah Lani is a sequel to his 2016 book, Who Am I? Yoga, Psychedelics and the Quest for Enlightenment. In that earlier book, the author looked critically at the issue of the legitimacy of psychedelics on the spiritual journey, ultimately leaving the question unanswered. In I Am Love, the intention is to offer a more definitive statement and practical method for those using psychedelics as a tool for spiritual growth.

Can psychedelics like ayahuasca really and truly reveal the ultimate nature of reality? Exploring ayahuasca in the context of studying the modern spiritual classic A Course in Miracles, the author answers cautiously in the affirmative. Yes, they can, but there is much inner work to be done to get there, not to mention confronting our great fear of awakening. Are you up for the greatest challenge of your lifetime, of any lifetime? Are you ready?

 

1. ‘There’s no plan b for your A-Game’ by Bo Eason

 

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There’s No Plan B For Your A-Game by Bo Eason is a book by the acclaimed athlete showcasing how to plot the best course in your life. There’s No Plan B for Your A-Game explains how to develop the character, integrity, and commitment it takes to become the best. Bo Eason focuses on a winning four-step process that helps you attain the skill, maintain the effort, and persist through challenges: Declaration: What do you want to achieve? Preparation: How can you make it happen? Acceleration: Where will you find the stamina to reach your goal? Domination: Why do you take others with you?

With inspiring, specific, real-word guidance, There’s No Plan B for Your A-Game teaches the best practices that lead to the best results, in every walk of life.

 

 

 

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Here’s Our List of Awesome Authors’ Memoirs and Biographies!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most—just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are memoirs and biographies! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

5. educated by Tara Westover

 

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Educated by Tara Westover tells the incredibly true story of Tara’s journey through the world of education. Hailing from the mountains of Idaho, Tara was isolated from mainstream society and when she entered a classroom for the first time, she was seventeen years old. Raised in a turbulent household, Tara decided to make something of herself. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home. This is a beautiful true story about rising from nothing and going against the system to prove you can do anything.

 

4. The Day went Missing by Richard Beard

 

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The Day That Went Missing by Richard Beard is a tragic story that is not an easy read but a well written tale of dealing with an unspeakable loss. On a family holiday, Richard and his young brother Nicholas are playing in the ocean. Then, tragedy strikes when Nicholas disappears under the waves and drowns. Richard’s family doesn’t attend the funeral and he keeps returning to the cottage, choosing to forget Nicky’s tragic death. Forty years later, Richard has become an acclaimed novelist and is determined to reclaim his lost childhood. He begins a pain staking journey to recreate the day of the accident and recover his brother in some small way through memory.

 

3. All you can ever know by Nicole Chung 

 

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All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung tells the tale of her trans-racial heritage and her quest to track down her birth mother. Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a trans-racial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up―facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn’t see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from―she wondered if the story she’d been told was the whole truth. With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child.

 

2. Who Drowns the Flowers in Your Mouth by Rigoberto Gonzalez 

 

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Who Drowns the Flowers in Your Mouth by Rigoberto Gonzalez is a beautifully written book by a poet. Burdened by poverty, illiteracy, and vulnerability as Mexican immigrants to California’s Coachella Valley, three generations of González men turn to vices or withdraw into depression. As brothers Rigoberto and Alex grow to manhood, they are haunted by the traumas of their mother’s early death, their lonely youth, their father’s desertion, and their grandfather’s invective. Rigoberto’s success in escaping―first to college and then by becoming a writer―is blighted by his struggles with alcohol and abusive relationships, while Alex contends with difficult family relations, his own rocky marriage, and fatherhood. Descending into a dark emotional space that compromises their mental and physical health, the brothers eventually find hope in aiding each other. This is an honest and revealing window into the complexities of Latino masculinity, the private lives of men, and the ways they build strength under the weight of grief, loss, and despair.

 

1. Solitary by Albert Woodfox 

 

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Solitary by Albert Woodfox is the unforgettable life story of a man who served more than four decades in solitary confinement―in a six foot by nine foot cell, twenty-three hours a day, in a notorious Angola prison in Louisiana―all for a crime he did not commit. That Albert Woodfox survived was, in itself, a feat of extraordinary endurance against the violence and deprivation he faced daily. That he was able to emerge whole from his odyssey within America’s prison and judicial systems is a triumph of the human spirit, and makes his book a clarion call to reform the inhumanity of solitary confinement in the U.S. and around the world. Remarkably self-aware, that anger or bitterness would have destroyed him in solitary confinement. But sustained by the shared solidarity of two fellow Panthers, Albert turned his anger into activism and resistance. This book is an ode to prisoners and a showcase of incredible resilience that turns to strength.

 

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Nonfiction Books To Expand Your Reading List With!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are bestsellers, and showcase what’s resonating with audiences right now! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

 

5. ‘I carried a Watermelon‘ by Katy Brand

 

I Carried a Watermelon

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I Carried a Watermelon by Katy Brand is a delightful book for fans of Dirty Dancing. In it, Brand explores the legacy of the film, from how it pushed women’s stories to the forefront of commercial cinema to its depiction of abortion, which has been described as ‘Gold Standard’ by pro-choice campaigners. Part memoir about a personal obsession, and part homage to the film, Brand’s celebration includes her own memories and interviews with other fans of the film.

 

4. ‘Crystals: A Guide to Using the Crystal Compass‘ by Aisha Amarfio

 

Crystals: A Guide to Using the Crystal Compass

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Crystals: A Guide to Using the Crystal Compass by Aisha Amarfio is exactly what it sounds on the tin. This is the ultimate guide to using crystals in every aspect of your life. Designed to accommodate the beginner crystal practitioner or merely someone who is interested in learning how crystals work, the book explains the major types of crystals, the best ways to use them, and helps you select the right type of crystal depending on your needs and desires.

 

 

3. ‘Louisa on the front linesby Samantha Seiple 

 

Louisa on the front lines

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Louisa on the Frontlines by Samantha Seiple is the first narrative nonfiction book focusing on the least-known aspect of Louisa May Alcott’s career—her time spent as a nurse during the Civil War. Though her service was brief, the dramatic experience was one that she considered pivotal in helping her write the beloved classic Little Women. It also deeply affected her tenuous relationship with her father, and inspired her commitment to abolitionism. Through it all, she kept a journal and wrote letters to her family and friends.

These letters were published in the newspaper, and her subsequent book, Hospital Sketches spotlighted the dire conditions of the military hospitals and the suffering endured by the wounded soldiers she cared for. To this day, her work is considered a pioneering account of military nursing. Alcott’s time as an Army nurse in the Civil War helped her find her authentic voice—and cemented her foundational belief system. Louisa on the Frontlines reveals the emergence of this prominent feminist and abolitionist–a woman whose life and work has inspired millions and continues to do so today.

 

2. ‘Challenged Accepted!‘ by Celeste Barber 

 

Challenged Accepted!

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Challenge Accepted! by Celeste Barber is a part memoir, part comedy routine, part advice manual, Challenge Accepted! is Celeste at her best, revealing her secrets to love, friendship, family, and marriage (oh hai, #hothusband), and how to deal with life’s many challenges—why she checks the bath for sharks, how Nutella quite literally shaped who she is as a woman, and why being famous on Instagram is like being rich in Monopoly. It’s real, like totally, really real.

 

1. We’re going to need more wine‘ by Gabrielle Union

 

We're Going to Need More Wine

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We’re Going To Need More Wine by Gabrielle Union is a fearless collection of personal essays from the woman who made her name with a passionate editorial about sexual violence. In this moving collection of thought provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses that same fearlessness to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards, and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents.

Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic, and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness, and the power of sharing truth, laughter, and support.

 

 

 

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Continue Your Bookshelf Expansion with Our Nonfiction Picks of the Week!

 

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks are bestsellers, and showcase what’s resonating with audiences right now! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

 

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5. The edge of every day by Marin Sardy 

The Edge of Every Day by Marin Sardy is a memoir-in-essays book about her mother’s and brother’s struggles with schizophrenia. Their stories contrast each other: the mother remaining undiagnosed while her brother did receive treatment but unfortunately committed suicide. Sardy offers no easy answers but instead shines a spotlight on the gray areas of showcasing struggles with mental health and how the system often fails those who do. She crafts something incredibly moving and although painful, it is a must read.

 

 

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4. High Heel by Summer Brennan

High Heel by Summer Brennan is a book about, well, you guessed it: high heels. But this is more than a fashion guide, and combines beautiful prose and insightful analysis to create a unique work of text that interrogates gender, fashion, and history. Brennan’s book challenges the reader to think about what a high heel truly is: painful and empowering, beautiful and restrictive, to create a complicated narrative that showcases heels in all their glory.

 

 

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3. Too much is not enough by Andrew Rannells

Too Much Is Not Enough by Andrew Rannells takes us on the journey of a twenty-something-year-old hungry to experience everything New York has to offer: new friends, wild nights, great art, standing ovations. At the heart of his hunger lies a powerful drive to reconcile the boy he was when he left Omaha with the man he desperately wants to be. As Rannells fumbles his way towards the Great White Way, he also shares the drama of failed auditions and behind-the-curtain romances, the heartbreak of losing his father at the height of his struggle, and the exhilaration of making his Broadway debut in Hairspray at the age of twenty-six. Along the way, he learns that you never really leave your past—or your family—behind; that the most painful, and perversely motivating jobs are the ones you almost get; and that sometimes the most memorable nights with friends are marked not by the trendy club you danced at but by the recap over diner food afterward.

 

 

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2. Me Elton John by Elton John

Me Elton John by the iconic singer tells the story of his drama filled, rocky, and yet uplifting life, chronicling his early days as a young boy who grew up in London and dreams of being a pop star. From there, the autobiography details his early singing gigs, the motivations behind his outlandish outfits, to his life spiraling out of control when he hit it big, his suicide attempt, and his recovery that led him to create music for Broadway. The autobiography isn’t just about Elton John’s fascinating life but the road to success, getting clean, and finding love in the simplest things even when you’re the loudest voice on stage.

 

 

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1. Notorious San Francisco by Paul Drexler 

Notorious San Francisco by Paul Drexler is a collection of true stories detailing the darkness beneath San Francisco’s idyllic streets. From serial killers, to organized crime, and bank robberies, this collection has it all, appealing to fans of true crime, noir, and good old fashioned murder thrillers, but with the added excitement that these crimes really happened. Most of these unusual cases are largely unknown and have never appeared in book form. Included are cases that are still unsolved today, including the mysterious tale of the Zodiac Killer, complete with a new analysis and a startling new theory on the murder.

 

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