Tag: zombies

5 Spooky Commercials Staring Stephen King

Stephen King once said, “Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn’t carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life,” which is a little strange seeing as he has starred in commercials.

Oh well. Books are better, but these commercials starring the King himself are still gold.

 

 

5-Creepshow TV Spot

Teaming up with the master of zombies, George Romero, Stephen King makes his screenwriting debut in this 1982 horror comedy anthology, Creepshow. With five stories, plus a prologue and epilogue, this film features a whole host of stars.

Heads up! Stephen King appears in “The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verill” as Jordy Verrill himself.

Check out the trailer below! Can you spot the King of horror in this movie directed by the king of zombies?

 

 

4-Libraries

Stephen King says we should go to our local libraries. They have many things, like music, televisions, computers, and books. It’s a timeless message, although their many extraneous features might not be so ‘unique’ anymore.

By the by, this commercial seems it might be setting up the premise for his next book, ‘Scary Author Lives in the Library and Makes Weird Faces at People’.

 

 

3-BOO! says the Ghost Writer

Sports Center advertises, but here they pull back the curtain and reveal their ‘ghost writer.’ He’s not an actual ghost, he’s Stephen King!

Please don’t be a ghost, your highness Mr. King. Sports Center was wrong, we need players with telekinetic powers.

 

 

2-“I just wanted someone to do stephen king right”

Here’s a commercial for an adaptation that he directed. It’s the first, and only film, he’s ever directed. As King himself said, he was on cocaine. In Hollywood’s Stephen KingKing says he was “coked out of [his] mind all through its production, and [he] really didn’t know what [he] was doing.”

Well, in the commercial he says that Maximum Overdrive, “It was my first picture as a director, and you know something? I sort of enjoyed it!”

This movie caused the cinematographer to go blind in his right eye.

 

 

1-The Horror! I lost my American Express card!

This commercial… has nothing to do with a book. It’s just how he really likes American Express. The most unnerving part about this commercial is how Stephen King takes it so seriously and the narrator is just a normal commercial narrator.

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Youtube

Braaaaains! And Some of the Best Zombie Novels of All Time!

Our culture is obsessed with zombies. The undead plague has caught on in nearly all forms of media: from movies (Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Zombieland), video games (Left 4 Dead, Dead Rising, Dying Light), and television (The Walking Dead, iZombie, Ash vs Evil Dead). And yes, literature too! Our obsession with the undead has created a lot of content, some of it awful but some of it quite good. Let’s have a look at who rises from the grave best, with the best zombie books of all time!

 

 

5. ‘Monster Island’ by David Wellington

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Monster Island by David Wellington takes place a month after the zombie apocalypse, where just a few pockets of humanity are struggling to survive against the horde. The story pairs up a military man with an army of schoolgirls, as they venture into a zombie infested New York City to find the cure for the undead plague. A fast paced, action packed novel with lots of zombie killing while building a fantastic atmosphere with the spooky New York location, this is a great, pulpy read.

 

4. ‘The Girl with all the gifts’ by M.R. Carey

 

Image via Amazon

 

The Girl With All The Gifts is a genre defying, emotionally hefty story that will leave you in tears at the end. The story follows a unique zombie plague (unique in that it’s fungal, not viral or bacterial). And the book takes place 20 years following the initial outbreak, and unfortunately, I can’t tell you much more than that in fear of spoiling it for you. The book has well-written female protagonists that don’t feel rushed or just thrown in for the sake of being there. It’s a uniquely heartfelt zombie book that you won’t be able to put down.

 

 

3. ‘The Reapers Are the Angels’ by Alden Bell

 

Image via Amazon

 

The Reapers Are the Angels by Alden Bell is another post-apocalyptic book, taking place after the rise of zombies and the fall of civilization. Civilization survives in meager enclaves, protecting themselves against the zombies just beyond their scraps of life. It focuses on a young, 15 year old girl called Temple, who can’t remember a time before the zombies but she does know how to survive. Painting an intimate portrait of loneliness, the book showcases Temple’s journey across the blighted earth, moving between civilization and the frontier beyond as she searches for a place she can call home.

 

2. ‘The Rising’ by Brian Keene

 

Image via Amazon

 

The Rising by Brian Keene is a highly regarded, beloved zombie novel that debuted in 2003 and has had heavy acclaim every since. It tells of a father’s desperate search for his young son against impossible odds, as he journeys across the zombie infested earth, alongside a preacher and a recovering heroin addict. They travel from town to town, city to city, and battling against zombies, his fellow man, and the elements. Full of horror, increasing intensity, and a desperate will to survive, this is a novel full of hope against impossible odds.

 

1. ‘World war Z’ by Max Brooks

 

Image Via Amazon

 

World War Z by Max Brooks is probably THE zombie novel.World War Z manages to scare readers with its plausibility, as it sounds like a zombie apocalypse that could actually happen. Brooks’ gritty zombie novel shows what would happen in a post war culture when zombies are involved, and the unforgiving brutality of it all hits close to home. Told from multiple points of view and showcasing what a global pandemic would look like, the book is full of scares, chilling moments, and showcasing a world that has lived through an apocalyptic event.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Tor.com

buffy

6 Chilling Book Recommendations Based On Your Favorite Spooky TV Shows

We love Halloween- it’s scary, campy, and you can be whatever you want to be (which you can mostly do all the time, unless what you want to be is a ghoul or a sexier version of something decidedly unsexy). Unfortunately, getting down to the last episode of your favorite show is not the fun kind of scary. But if your show is on this list, here are some spooky, whacky, and genuinely frightening reads to tide you over.

 

 

Buffy the Vampire Slayer

 

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

 

 

Those of us with Buffy nostalgia face a challenge that can be scarier than the show itself- the fact that the show’s been finished since 2003. But if you can’t live without the misadventures of the teens quietly (and sometimes NOT so quietly) defending Sunnydale from monsters, why not explore an untold part of that story?

 

Patrick Ness’ The Rest of Us Just Live Here explores the lives of background characters in a nondescript town like Sunnydale for those of us who have never fought a vampire with our bare hands (or, you know, with anything else). Teenagers beset with their own slew of issues try to exist as the Chosen Ones deal with their zombie cops and spooky blue lights from outer space. This genre-bending book merges fantasy with reality as Ness explores how ordinary human lives fit in with the high stakes of genre fiction.

 

 

Supernatural

 

Vicious by V.E. Schwab

 

 

Unlike with Buffy, anyone who watches Supernatural knows there’s no shortage of content. Now entering its fourteenth season, the cult classic has thrilled viewers since 2005 with its story of two inseparable brothers who save lives, hunt monsters, make questionable choices, and fight with each other nonstop.

 

V.E. Schwab’s Vicious is a twist on the typical superhero story, following two former classmates who were once as close as brothers. When a string of bad decisions puts the friends in uncomfortably close contact with the world of the supernatural, some lives are saved- and others are lost. The mercurial relationship between Schwab’s protagonists may remind you of Supernatural‘s infamous brothers, and the hunting definitely will.

 

 

Stranger Things

 

It by Stephen King

 

 

This hit TV show taps into 80s nostalgia in a serious way, and so modern books just won’t always sate your craving. You can take the edge off this with a book with the story that inspired last fall’s pop culture phenomenon: Stephen King’s IT.

 

Written in 1990 and set in the mid 80s, the story also focuses on a gang of kids taking on a threat that adults in town don’t understand. Featuring a familiar camaraderie, the Losers try to stop the entity that they have discovered, attempting to save both their town and themselves. And is there collateral damage? Well, isn’t there always?

 

The Walking Dead

 

Zone One by Colson Whitehead

 

 

Zombies might seem to be the territory of genre fiction and pop culture, but that isn’t always the case. Literary superstar Colson Whitehead’s Zone One blends genre and literary fiction as it explores not the zombie apocalypse exactly, but what happens after.

 

With the mixture of tenderness and violence that viewers expect from The Walking Dead, Whitehead explicitly wanders into the thematic landscape of zombies, discussing at length the kind of moral and existential questions that many zombie stories only hint at.

 

American Horror Story

 

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

 

 

It might be hard to decide what will get you your AHS fix, given the wide range of premises the show offers. Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus shares a similar versatility, blending elements of magic and witchcraft (like AHS season 3) with the creepy aesthetic of a sinister traveling circus (season 4). With a flair for the strange, cruel, and dramatic, The Night Circus’ range of amoral characters and tragically doomed human connections are reminiscent of all seasons of AHS.

 

Black Mirror

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

 

 

While not explicitly a horror show, Black Mirror’s one-off dystopian plot lines terrify audiences with their creativity… and plausibility. Often focusing on motifs of alienation and technology, the show provides us with a horrifying reality that we both can and cannot imagine. A YA classic, Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies depicts a dystopian world in which, on their sixteenth birthday, teenagers undergo surgery to become Pretties- artificially enhanced beautiful people with equally beautiful lives (sounds exactly like being sixteen, right?). Unfortunately, life is not quite as beautiful as it appears. And unfortunately, that’s not all the surgery does.

 

 

Featured Image Via 2glory.de. All in-text images via Amazon.