Tag: YA

The Outsiders Cast

On This Day in 1967: ‘The Outsiders’ First Published

On April 24th, 1967, The Outsiders was published as a cheap, drugstore paperback, in a time before the YA fiction market even existed.

Author S.E. Hinton started writing her famous book at just fifteen—and, amazingly enough, this wasn’t even the first book she wrote! She reveals in an interview for Entertainment Weekly that in middle school she wrote a book about The Civil War, commenting that she has “no idea what [she] thought [she] knew about the Civil War.” 

The premise of The Outsiders, though, was something she knew about from her experiences with a divided community that closely paralleled the deep cultural division between the “Socs” and the “Greasers.”

She relates, for instance, that the opening scene of the book—when Ponyboy is jumped while he walks home alone from the movies—was inspired by one of her friends getting jumped in real life. And yes, she says, her friends were really called “Greasers!”  

 

SE Hinton
Matt Dillon and S.E. Hinton on the set of Rumble Fish
IMAGE VIA IMGUR

Later in the interview, she reveals:

“I get so many letters from people saying, “You changed my life.” That scares me. I love getting letters saying, “I never liked to read, but I read your book, and now I’m going on to read other books.” But the “You changed my life” stuff is scary, because who am I to change anybody’s life? But I’ve learned to deal with it by thinking, The Outsiders was meant to be written, and I got chosen to write it. The rest of ’em, I just wrote, but The Outsiders was supposed to be there.”

Even today, during a time when the YA fiction market is thriving, this book still feels different from a lot of other books for young readers. In most fiction you read in middle school, like The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, there’s a clear “bad guy” and a “good guy.” I think The Outsiders still feels original because it doesn’t pretend that good and evil are such distinct categories—the real villain in The Outsiders is the socioeconomic disparity that divides the Socs and the Greasers in the first place. Hinton does a thorough job of showing the reality of both sides, like when Cherry Valance says, “Maybe the two different worlds we live in weren’t so different. We saw the same sunset.”

 

The Outsiders

IMAGE VIA VARIETY

The Outsiders gained further staying power and widespread fame when it was adapted into an 1983 film adaptation directed by Francis Ford Coppola, starring celebrities like Rob Lowe, Patrick Swayze, and Tom Cruise. Mandi Bierly writes for HBO that the

“performances can be endearingly green and melodramatic at times; given the actors’ ages, the fast-moving plot, and the heightened teen emotions (“Let’s do it for Johnny, man! We’ll do it for Johnny!”), it’s to be expected. But there are also moments that ring so true, you feel them scarring your heart the way only teen dramas can: ‘I used to talk about killing myself all the time. Man, I don’t want to die now. It ain’t long enough. Sixteen years ain’t gonna be long enough.'”

Whether in the form of a book or a movie, the message of The Outsiders clearly resonates with teens. Hopefully, it will continue to remain popular reading for young readers for decades to come!

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Teresa Palmer as Diana Bishop reading a book - A Discovery of Witches

5 Magical Book Series With Enchanting Future Adaptations

Spring is here, the time of new life, so it’s time to spring-clean your must-watch and must-read lists before summertime! We’ve got five enchanting book series for you to read, each of which you can expect to see coming to your screens. Some will show up sooner than others (like A Discovery of Witches which premieres April 7 9/8c on AMC), but as for those adaptations without official release dates—we’re sure you’ll have fun looking forward to them!

So, without further ado, here are five magical series that are certain to enchant you.

 

1. Deborah Harkness’s All Souls Series / AMC’s A Discovery of Witches

Teresa Palmer as Diana Bishop with hand on the nose of white horse
Teresa Palmer as Diana Bishop – A Discovery of Witches _ Season 1 – Photo Credit: Adrian Rogers/SKY Productions/Sundance Now

 

Based on Deborah Harkness‘ bestselling All Souls trilogy, AMC’s upcoming TV adaptation A Discovery of Witches follows Diana Bishop, a historian and reluctant witch who accidentally calls up a bewitched manuscript. This mistake will propel her into a world of dark magic and forbidden love… thereby introducing her to the intriguing, mysterious geneticist and vampire Matthew Clairmont.

This is a thrilling series to both read and watch, so get turning those pages before A Discovery of Witches premieres April 7 9/8c on AMC.

Follow the show on Facebook and Twitter! And don’t miss your chance to win $500 by entering below!

 

 

2. Patrick Ness’ Chaos Walking series 

 

Patrick Ness's Chaose Walking Trilogy | Image Via The Edge
Patrick Ness’s Chaos Walking Trilogy | Image Via The Edge

 

Upcoming film Chaos Walking is based on Patrick Ness‘ The Knife of Never Letting Go, the first in his bestselling YA Chaos Walking trilogy. The story is set in a dystopian future where children are raised to believe that a virus killed off all the women in their colony, which caused a mass unleashing of psychological “noise,” the ability to hear the minds of people and animals. When Todd happens upon an unknown person who is two remarkable things—silent and a girl—he realizes that the stories about the virus may not be what they seem.

The film adaptation, on its way in 2020, stars Daisy Ridley, Tom Holland, and Nick Jonas.

 

3. Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl Series

 

Artemis Fowl book covers
Image Via Collider

 

The Artemis Fowl franchise currently boasts no less than eight instalments in addition to a collection of graphic novels and a spin-off, The Fowl Twins, in the works. The beloved and long-running series follows the adventures of a boy genius who, in the first novel, kidnaps a fairy in the hopes of extorting ransom from the Fairy People and restoring the Fowl family fortune. It gets weirder—and even more awesome—from there.

A film adaptation was first announced all the way back in 2001, but it wasn’t until Disney took over the project in 2016 that things really got moving. Starring newcomer Ferdia Shaw in the titular role, Artemis Fowl comes out August 9th, and is sure to be worth the long wait!

 

4. Victoria Aveyard’s The Red Queen Series 

 

VICTORIA AVEYARD'S THE RED QUEEN SERIES 
Image Via YouTube

 

Victoria Aveyard is only twenty-eight-years-old, but she’s the bestselling author of Red Queen, the first instalment of an amazing (and amazingly popular) fantasy series. Mare Barrow lives in a profoundly stratified society, a seemingly irreparable schism between the upper-class people with silver blood and the poorer people who have red blood. The catch? Silver blooded people have magical abilities. Poor people have nothing. That is, except for Mare, who has red blood and a superhuman power…

Universal Studios purchased the rights, and The Hunger Games‘ Elizabeth Banks has signed on to direct the movie adaptation!

5. V.E. Schwab’s Shades of Magic Series 

 

V.E. Schwab's trilogy book covers
Image Via Tor/Forge Blog

 

A Darker Shade of Magic, the first in V.E. Schwab‘s Shades of Magic series follows Kell as he travels through four different Londons, each of them distinct in their levels of magic. Kell is from Red London, an extremely magical city that may not be quite as safe as its residents seem to believe. When Kell, the only remaining magician who can move between these worlds, meets a human woman from our own ordinary London, they’ll have some universe-saving to do. NPR says the hit series is compulsively readable, “with the ease of a young-adult novel, with short paragraphs, quick-moving prose, and plenty of action;” at the same time, “it’s grimmer even than the current bout of post-Hunger Games YA.” We can’t wait to get our hearts crushed!

We don’t yet have a cast or official dates for the Sony Pictures adaptation, which will be produced by Gerard Butler. But hey, that just means you’ll have more time to get reading!

A selection of 2018's bestselling YA reads, including 'Children of Blood and Bone' and 'The Poet X'

YA Crisis: U.K. Faces Steep Decline in Demand for YA Books

YA is a massively polarizing genre, and, when faced with its possible decline, any avid reader is bound to have one of two drastically different reactions. One possible reaction is something along the lines of: Finally! Now I’ll never have to read about an entire world that somehow possesses the logic and nuance of a Buzzfeed zodiac quiz! The other is NO! 

If you’re in the first camp, consider what this sharp decline actually means: fewer children are reading.

 

Banner: "YA? Y Not?!"

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It’s no secret that childhood reading is extremely beneficial with significant academic and interpersonal perks: readers score higher on tests and have stronger interpersonal skills, including empathy and the ability to understand others. Delighted critics may rejoice the disappearance of YA’s infamous, highly-stylized dystopias and not understand the problem—that’s not what YA is. And the decline in British YA sales has had consequences beyond fewer possible blockbusters: children’s books are also underperforming in libraries. Experts warn that this decline—which comes in the wake of drastic budget cuts—may have lasting consequences on the reading habits of a generation.

To answer the question of why this is happening, let’s consider the matter of where this is happening. Though YA sales have been consistently strong in the U.S., sales have suffered in the U.K. specifically—2018 saw the lowest profits in eleven years. (To refresh your memory, that was the year before The Hunger Games‘ release changed the game for YA fiction.) To understand the crisis, it’s critical to understand the difference between the American and British market for YA books: there isn’t one. According to British YA authors, the U.K. market for children’s literature is oversaturated with American content.

In 2018, all of the U.K.’s top 5 bestselling YA novels were by American authors. Only one British writer even cracked the top 10: Michelle Magorian, author of Goodnight Mister Tom (which is a decades-old classic rather than a new release). Those across the industry are concerned about what this might mean for U.K. children… and what it already means for U.K. authors.

 

U.K. YA authors of queer fiction Lisa Williamson and Alice Oseman

Books by authors Lisa Williamson and Alice Oseman, u.k. Authors of LGBT+ YA fICTION
Image Via Pretty Books

 

Promotion is centered around these foreign books while advances for British authors remain dauntingly small—£1,000 for an entire novel. These prohibitively small payments will limit new authors struggling to break into publishing. U.K. authors have also reported that American books tend to receive the most promotion, making their marketing efforts far more successful. And it’s not just authors who aren’t seeing any income: the aforementioned library cuts have led to the termination of around 1,000 librarians and shrinking purchasing budgets for new material. Fewer librarians, fewer books, and fewer young readers.

There are factors besides the overwhelming American cultural influence, most notably, a misconception about what YA is. For starters—not a genre. YA Waterstones buyer Kate McHale stresses, “YA is an age category.” With big titles covering topics ranging from fantastic depictions of Nigerian myth (Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi) to a queer Muslim girl forced into an arranged marriage (The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali by Sabina Khan) it’s clear that YA is no longer all about who can write the hottest vampire kisses… if it ever actually was. YA is a territory of increasing diversity and a proven willingness to tackle difficult issues. The only thing these books have in common is that their protagonists are within a certain age range—the distinction of YA has nothing to do with the quality of the writing or the significance of the piece.

 

'The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali' and more diverse releases

Image Via SABINA kHAN tWITTER

 

Children’s book consultant Jake Hope believes that another factor in the decline may be the price of YA books. Though teenagers generally don’t have significant (or any) income, books for that audience cost the same as books for adults who (generally) have disposable income. While this may be true, it’s also true in countries throughout the world. The concern of U.K. children seeing adolescence primarily through an American cultural lens seems far more significant. Furthermore, U.K. authors of color have voiced concerns about their representation in the market. Of the U.K.’s 2018 YA authors, only 1.5% were people of color—as opposed to a more significant (if still slight)11% in the U.S.

 

Statistics on authors of color, showing an incredibly small percentage of UK authors of color.

Image Via Nikesh Shukla Twitter

 

Just how steep is this decline, anyway? Steep. Publishers report a 26% decrease in sales. And just how serious are the consequences? Experts believe this could “severely” affect literacy levels. The solution to this problem might remain unclear, but the problem is increasingly obvious.

 

Featured Image Via Bustle

 

bright places

Filming Starts for Netflix Adaptation of ‘All the Bright Places’ Starring Elle Fanning

Filming as commenced for Netflix’s adaptation of Jennifer Niven’s YA hit All the Bright Places. The film will star Elle Fanning and ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ actor Justice Smith in the leading roles of Violet and Finch. 

 

Both actors posted to Instagram, marking their first day on set. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Violet + Finch. Day 1 #AllTheBrightPlaces @netflix #bretthaley

A post shared by Elle Fanning (@ellefanning) on

 

All the Bright Places, first published in 2015, follows a suicidal young man named Theodore Finch, and Violet Markey, a girl who is living for the future, desperate to escape her small town and the memory of her sister’s death. The pair meet on a bell tower at school, and it is unclear who saves whom… 

 

The book has been lauded for its sensitivity and quality, with the New York Times noting:

 

Violet and Finch are the archetypal offering in contemporary young adult fiction: a pair of damaged, heart-tugging teenagers who are at once outcasts and isolated, trapped by the dissonant alchemy of their combined fates.

 

The Netflix adaptation does not currently have a release date. 

 

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