Tag: WatershipDown

Alice in Wonderland Rabbit

Five of the Hip-Hoppin’est Rabbits From Literature

Easter’s coming up, and whether or not you get a protected holiday – looking at you Ireland with your two week vacation – there’s something worth celebrating, whether it’s 50% off Easter chocolates come Monday, or famous rabbits in literature. Though at Bookstr, we’re going to celebrate with both!

 

1. Rabbit from Winnie-the-Pooh

 

Rabbit

Image via Basement Rejects

 

Rabbit gets the first slot on our list because of all the rabbits in literature, Rabbit seems the most lazily named. Sure, three other bunnies on this list have Rabbit, or a not-so-subtle reference to rabbits, in their name, but at least they have surnames? Rabbit is just Rabbit. But then again, Piglet is also not so original..

 

2. Peter Rabbit from The Tale of Peter Rabbit

 

Peter Rabbit

Image via The New York Times

 

Peter Rabbit is a fan favorite in this office, but the Hollywood treatment has really put a downer on our love for this bundle of fluff. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a huge fan of James Cordon, but forty-seven seconds of the trailer was enough for me. 

 

3. Peter Cottontail from The Adventures of Peter Cottontail

 

Peter Cottontail

Image via Amazon

 

Another rabbit named Peter, but this one’s surname is Cottontail! How original! I joke, I kid, these are childhood classics that I love and love dearly. This might be the Mandela Effect in action, but I’m convinced that Peter Rabbit and Peter Cottontail are two separate entities in literature, but apparently Peter Cottontail is just a rhyme, and Peter Cottontail doesn’t have any beautiful old-timey illustrations, which is upsetting.

 

4. Literally any character from Watership Down

 

Watership Down

Image via Good Reads

 

I think it’s safe to say that Watership Down is the most famous piece of literature about rabbits. And by that I mean, only about rabbits. If you haven’t read this American classic, you should put it on your list of books to read before you die, because despite the main characters being rabbits, they’re a fully formed culture with their own language including proverbs, poetry, and mythology.

 

5. Bunnicula from Bunnicula: A Rabbit-Tale of Mystery

 

Bunnicula

Image via Amazon

 

Some may say Bunnicula is more Halloween than Easter, but hey, we’re listing famous rabbits in literature, and what list would be complete without my favorite Dracula spin off. The Monroe family finds a bunny at the theatre after their screening of Dracula, and name him Bunnicula. Chester the cat is convinced Bunnicula is actually a vampire, despite his vegan vegetable-juice diet, and attempts to get Harold the dog’s help to save the family from this potential threat. Told from Harold’s perspective, Bunnicula is a wild ride that I absolutely loved as a kid.

 

Honorable mention goes to Nivens McTwisp, The White Rabbit from Alice in Wonderland

 

Featured Image via Another Concept.

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10 Fictional Languages From Novels

Most of us think that it’s hard enough to write well in English, but writing in ‘common’ languages is just not enough for some authors. Throughout the history of literature, great writers have developed and written in entirely new languages. Particularly in the genres of science fiction and fantasy, these languages help create a complete world and transport the reader to another time or place. If you’re a fan of creative linguistics, check out the ten great fictional languages on this list! You can even learn to speak a few of them.

 

Dothraki from the A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin’s fantasy world is incredibly complete, right down to the fictional languages that his different characters use. Dothraki is spoken by the Dothraki people of the Dothraki Sea (which is actually a desert.) The language is spoken from time to time in the book series, but it really took off when television producers hired a linguistics expert to flesh it out into a full-fledged language for the Game of Thrones HBO series.

 

Esperanto, used in the Stainless Steel Rat Series by Harry Harrison

Esperanto is different from every other language on this list, in that it wasn’t made up by an author. It was made up, however – by a linguist who wanted to create a more efficient and simple universal language. It’s done pretty well by made-up language standards, but it hasn’t exactly caught on worldwide. In Harry Harrison’s fictional future, however, it’s all the rage.

 

The Fremen language from the Dune series by Frank Herbert

The Fremen language is spoken by the Fremen, natives of the desert planet Arrakis in Frank Herbert’s Dune universe. In the novels, the Fremen language is a linguistic descendent of real-world Arabic. Herbert’s vision is incredibly complete: there are different dialects of the Fremen language, and its use is charted over Dune’s long history in Herbert’s many novels.

 

Lapine from Watership Down by Richard Adams

The rabbit protagonists of Watership Down don’t speak English: they have their own language called Lapine, an invention of author Richard Adams. Adams has said that his goal was to create a “wuffy, fluffy” language for his rabbits. There is a sort of fluffiness to the tone, but other influences include Arabic and Gaelic.

 

Nadsat slang from A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

The characters of Burgess’ dystopian world speak English, but not in a way that you or I would recognize. Burgess’ neo-English is full of “Nadsat” slang, which gives his rough characters an unfamiliar and ominous voice. Burgess was a linguist, and he used his background to create a realistic form of quasi-English – the new dialect is influenced by the Russian language.

 

Newspeak from 1984 by George Orwell

George Orwell’s Newspeak language is more than just a fun, futuristic dialect for his science fiction book. It’s an integral part of the plot and the point of the book. Newspeak is a language that’s created by the totalitarian government of Oceania as a way to suppress freedom of thought.

 

Old Tongue from the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan

Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series is in many ways a quintessential fantasy epic. World creation is a huge part of the series appeal, including the extensive language that Jordan constructed for the books. The Old Tongue is a dead language, used primarily by scholars at the time of Jordan’s narrative.

 

Parseltongue from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

One of the earliest scenes in the Harry Potter series features Harry conversing with a snake. By the second book, Rowling has revealed that Harry was actually speaking a language called Parseltongue, which Wizards can use to communicate with all different types of snakes. Parseltongue, as you might expect, sounds like hissing to non-speakers. To Harry, though, it’s understood as if it were English.

 

Quenya (Elvish) from The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

Every made-up fantasy language since Tolkien has been measured against the great languages of the Lord of the Rings series. Tolkien invented several fantasy languages, but Quenya – the language of Middle Earth’s elves – is his most famous. It’s so well-developed that Tolkien aficionados can even learn the language.

 

R’lyehian from the writings of H.P. Lovecraft 

Lovecraft’s interconnected fantasy worlds feature lots of creative inventions, including this fictional language. R’lyehian made its Earth debut thanks to the spawn of Cthulhu (the famous tentacle-faced monster). It appears in many of Lovecraft’s short stories.

 

Featured image courtesy of http://bit.ly/1KA1N2y

Stephen L., Staff Writer