Tag: vicious

#Bookstagrammer of the Week: @booksnest

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This Week’s Featured creator: @booksnest

 

Each week Bookstr is going to be highlighting your favorite Bookstagrammers. A Bookstagrammer is someone who shares all of their literary interests, ranging from book reviews and aesthetically pleasing book pictures to outfit pictures featuring their current reads. Anything that evokes bibliophile feels is on their Instagram pages. Make sure to give these Bookstagrammers the love they deserve! This week we are getting to know a Bookstagrammer, blogger, and book lover: Beth, or as you would know her on Instagram, @booksnest.

Here is her story:

 

image via @booksnest

 

 

Chapter 1: The Birth of a Bookstagram Account

 

Beth, a Bookstagrammer from Berkshire in the South of England, joined the Bookstagram community purely for her love of books and as a personal goal for herself.

 

I loved following other book accounts so I started my own in 2013 as a New Year’s resolution. I took photos I loved and have continued to do so ever since. I wanted to feel part of this community and that is exactly what I have achieved.

 

Beth’s favorite books are mostly from the fantasy genre, including The Priory of the Orange Tree, Vicious, The Poppy War, Strange the Dreamer and A Good Girl’s Guide to MurderHer favorite authors are V.E. Schwab and Samantha Shannon.

If given the chance, Beth would take a selfie with V.E. Schwab, of course.

 

 

image via @booksnest

 

So what books does Beth plan to read in the near future?

I don’t tend to set a TBR to be honest, but in my head I know soon I want to get to Ninth House, A Little Life and The Dragon Republic.

 

Her fandoms are Harry Potter, Star Trek, and The Lord of the Rings.

 

Beth’s fun fact is more about horses than about books.

I used to ride a horse called Treacle as a kid, but as an adult I’ve never got on a horse. 

 

Chapter 2: To The Bookstagramming

 

Bookstagrammers carefully choose the prettiest book covers to fit their aesthetic and theme, and Beth also has some personal favorites.

I think the covers for the Caraval series are stunning and so clever! 

 

She can describe her Bookstagram aesthetic in one word:

YELLOW! ??

 

Beth adjusts her schedule to her followers’ activity in order to determine what times she should post. She rightfully takes pride in the followers she has.

I always post around 8pm GMT during the week and sometimes in the morning around 10am GMT at the weekends. I either post daily or every other day, I base this on how well my last post did and if I want to give it more time to grow. I get these times by looking at my Instagram insights and seeing when my followers are more online. 

When I hit 10k in May of 2019 I felt a real sense of pride and accomplishment and I felt really happy. That was a big day for me and really hit home that my hard work had paid off. 

 

image via @booksnest

 

Beth is most inspired by these four fellow Bookstagrammers:

@amysbookshelf

@throneofshatteredbooks

@everlasting.charm

@hayaisreading

 

 

Chapter 3: What does bookstagram mean to you?

 

Beth’s Bookstagram page is a beautiful representation of her favorite reads, but what does it mean to her personally, and what does she hope it means to other people?

Bookstagram is living proof of my dedication and motivation to grow and develop a space to create my content. It shows my love of reading and photography, but also somewhere for me to fuel my creativity and that means an awful lot to me! 

I want to offer a cosy and happy space for people to come to enjoy both the photos and the books I feature. I also love being able to offer help and advice to other Bookstagrammers.  

 

She also has some advice to offer aspiring Bookstagrammers.

Building up an audience takes time, but as long as you’re doing what you love and learning and developing each day, you will grow. Don’t take it too seriously, have fun with it and keep putting in the effort. With persistence, you will see growth, but it does take time. 

 

Featured image via @booksnest

 

 


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buffy

6 Chilling Book Recommendations Based On Your Favorite Spooky TV Shows

We love Halloween- it’s scary, campy, and you can be whatever you want to be (which you can mostly do all the time, unless what you want to be is a ghoul or a sexier version of something decidedly unsexy). Unfortunately, getting down to the last episode of your favorite show is not the fun kind of scary. But if your show is on this list, here are some spooky, whacky, and genuinely frightening reads to tide you over.

 

 

Buffy the Vampire Slayer

 

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

 

 

Those of us with Buffy nostalgia face a challenge that can be scarier than the show itself- the fact that the show’s been finished since 2003. But if you can’t live without the misadventures of the teens quietly (and sometimes NOT so quietly) defending Sunnydale from monsters, why not explore an untold part of that story?

 

Patrick Ness’ The Rest of Us Just Live Here explores the lives of background characters in a nondescript town like Sunnydale for those of us who have never fought a vampire with our bare hands (or, you know, with anything else). Teenagers beset with their own slew of issues try to exist as the Chosen Ones deal with their zombie cops and spooky blue lights from outer space. This genre-bending book merges fantasy with reality as Ness explores how ordinary human lives fit in with the high stakes of genre fiction.

 

 

Supernatural

 

Vicious by V.E. Schwab

 

 

Unlike with Buffy, anyone who watches Supernatural knows there’s no shortage of content. Now entering its fourteenth season, the cult classic has thrilled viewers since 2005 with its story of two inseparable brothers who save lives, hunt monsters, make questionable choices, and fight with each other nonstop.

 

V.E. Schwab’s Vicious is a twist on the typical superhero story, following two former classmates who were once as close as brothers. When a string of bad decisions puts the friends in uncomfortably close contact with the world of the supernatural, some lives are saved- and others are lost. The mercurial relationship between Schwab’s protagonists may remind you of Supernatural‘s infamous brothers, and the hunting definitely will.

 

 

Stranger Things

 

It by Stephen King

 

 

This hit TV show taps into 80s nostalgia in a serious way, and so modern books just won’t always sate your craving. You can take the edge off this with a book with the story that inspired last fall’s pop culture phenomenon: Stephen King’s IT.

 

Written in 1990 and set in the mid 80s, the story also focuses on a gang of kids taking on a threat that adults in town don’t understand. Featuring a familiar camaraderie, the Losers try to stop the entity that they have discovered, attempting to save both their town and themselves. And is there collateral damage? Well, isn’t there always?

 

The Walking Dead

 

Zone One by Colson Whitehead

 

 

Zombies might seem to be the territory of genre fiction and pop culture, but that isn’t always the case. Literary superstar Colson Whitehead’s Zone One blends genre and literary fiction as it explores not the zombie apocalypse exactly, but what happens after.

 

With the mixture of tenderness and violence that viewers expect from The Walking Dead, Whitehead explicitly wanders into the thematic landscape of zombies, discussing at length the kind of moral and existential questions that many zombie stories only hint at.

 

American Horror Story

 

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

 

 

It might be hard to decide what will get you your AHS fix, given the wide range of premises the show offers. Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus shares a similar versatility, blending elements of magic and witchcraft (like AHS season 3) with the creepy aesthetic of a sinister traveling circus (season 4). With a flair for the strange, cruel, and dramatic, The Night Circus’ range of amoral characters and tragically doomed human connections are reminiscent of all seasons of AHS.

 

Black Mirror

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

 

 

While not explicitly a horror show, Black Mirror’s one-off dystopian plot lines terrify audiences with their creativity… and plausibility. Often focusing on motifs of alienation and technology, the show provides us with a horrifying reality that we both can and cannot imagine. A YA classic, Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies depicts a dystopian world in which, on their sixteenth birthday, teenagers undergo surgery to become Pretties- artificially enhanced beautiful people with equally beautiful lives (sounds exactly like being sixteen, right?). Unfortunately, life is not quite as beautiful as it appears. And unfortunately, that’s not all the surgery does.

 

 

Featured Image Via 2glory.de. All in-text images via Amazon.