Tag: valentines

You’ll Swoon for this Audible Original Romance

Valentine’s Day may have been and gone, but love is still very much in the air for Audible listeners. Yesterday, Audible released an exclusive of New York Times Bestselling author A.L. James’ novel Catch Me When I Fall.

 

Image via audible

 

Performed by Jason Clarke and Virginia Rose, Catch Me When I Fall follows Royce and Emily after a night of passion that looks set to change everything. Emily fronts a country rock band that Royce desperately needs to sign to his record label. With his family at risk, his night with Emily may be one of his biggest mistakes. Can their passion for one another overcome the problems that it brings? I don’t know, but I’m ready to find out!

 

Why should we forget about romance just because Valentine’s is over? Keep the love alive and listen to the Original on Audible now.

Featured image via pinterest


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5 Love Poems to Read on Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s day is typically known as a couple’s holiday – a holiday which inspires gifts of roses, chocolates, and even marriage proposals. For me though, and maybe it’s the English major in me, this is a day that makes me want to read love poems. I know, I know. It’s extremely corny to say that. Call me a romantic, but there is something about reading a poem and knowing that it was crafted for someone that the poet loved that just makes me want to sit with those words. Poetry is hard to write. Sometimes, a five line poem can take hours, or even days, to craft. So a love poem, to me, isn’t just a handful of sweet words–it is one of the most powerful ways to express one’s affection.

All of my mushy rambling about love poetry aside, here are five love poems that you can read on Valentine’s day.

 

 

1. Harold pinter’sit is here

image via wallpaper flare

What sound was that?
I turn away, into the shaking room.

What was that sound that came in on the dark?
What is this maze of light it leaves us in?
What is this stance we take,
To turn away and then turn back?
What did we hear?
It was the breath we took when we first met.

Listen. It is here.

 

2. E.E. Cumming’s[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]

image via pinterest
i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart)i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go,my dear;and whatever is done
by only me is your doing,my darling) (read more)
(Cummings has a very interesting way of formatting his poetry. The absence of capitalization and absence of spaces between parentheses and the rest of the line is fully intentional)

3. Pablo Neruda’sIf you Forget me

image via dhgate

You know how this is:
if I look
at the crystal moon, at the red branch
of the slow autumn at my window,
if I touch
near the fire
the impalpable ash
or the wrinkled body of the log,
everything carries me to you,
as if everything that exists,
aromas, light, metals,
were little boats
that sail
toward those isles of yours that wait for me. (read more)

 

 

4. Spiritwind Wood’sLet’s Grow old Together

image via wallpaper flare

Let’s sit underneath the open sky
and watch the night just pass us by
let’s me and you dream of the now
and don’t worry about tomorrow
you know we will make it somehow

Let us talk about our plan
two lover’s hand in hand
and let’s grow old together (read more)

 

 

5. Christina Rossetti’sI loved you first: but afterwards your love

image via pinterest
I loved you first: but afterwards your love
Outsoaring mine, sang such a loftier song
As drowned the friendly cooings of my dove.
Which owes the other most? my love was long,
And yours one moment seemed to wax more strong;
I loved and guessed at you, you construed me
And loved me for what might or might not be –
Nay, weights and measures do us both a wrong. (read more)


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Featured Image Via Money Crashers

7 Books That Celebrate Female Sexuality

It’s officially the month of love, and as we learn from doctor/author Emily Nagoski, our most powerful sexual organ is actually located between our ears (not our legs). That’s why we chose to highlight these stimulating reads that inform and inspire us on a subject that doesn’t get enough attention: female sexuality. So, whether you’ve got a Valentine’s date lined up or plan to indulge in a little romance for one, these books will definitely get you in the mood!

 

1. ‘Come as you are’ by emily nagoski

IMAGE VIA AMAZON

Years and years of research on the female libido and we still lack a universal answer to the question of “what makes us tick”. Why? As Dr. Nagoski explains in this New York Times bestseller, there isn’t one. Unlike men, all women have unique sexualities that vary and are highly influenced by life’s complications like mood, setting, and body image. Understanding these elements and how to take control of them will transform your sexual wellbeing in ways you may never have thought possible!

 

2. ‘F*cked: Being sexually explorative and self-confident in a world that’s screwed’ by Corinne Fisher & krystyna Hutchinson

image via amazon

If you haven’t listened to Guys We F*cked: The Anti Slut-Shaming Podcast, then first of all, what are you doing?! Hosts and now debuting authors Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson have tackled every subject under the umbrella of sexuality, from kinks and toys to trauma and shame. The best part? They laugh the whole way through… because let’s be honest, sex can be hilarious. These ladies are not for the faint of heart, so gear up and proceed with caution.

 

 

3. ‘She Comes first’ by Ian Kerner

image via amazon

This is one for women who date men (bless our souls). From sex therapist Ian Kerner comes “the thinking man’s guide to pleasuring a woman,” starring one particular act of foreplay that we can all agree deserves a spotlight. Buy this book for your boyfriends, husbands, friends, acquaintances… just any guy, really. Maybe not your coworker.

 

4. ‘Three Women’ by lisa taddeo

image via amazon

Slightly different from the previous books on this list, Taddeo takes a narrative approach to female sexuality by following the real lives of three American women over the span of eight years. One sleeps with her high school teacher, one cheats on a loveless marriage with an old flame, one has sex with other men in front of her husband: all will make you feel deeply connected to the trials of womanhood. Bold, messy, and real from start to finish, Three Women is an absolute must-read.

 

5. ‘Fear of flying’ by erica jong

image via amazon

It’s been nearly five decades since the iconic novel was first released and met with controversy typical of the time, but it is no less relevant today than it was then. The story follows fictional character Isadora Wing through a series of sexual fantasies and encounters that ultimately lead to some serious self-discovery. Her “fear of flying” applies both to traveling on planes and to existing free from the confines of traditional femininity, making Jong a pioneer of sexual liberation who paved the way for our modern Hannah Horvaths and Carrie Bradshaws.

 

 

6. ‘tipping the velvet’ by sarah waters

image via amazon

You simply can’t talk about lesbian fiction without mentioning Sarah Waters. Set in 1890s England, Tipping the Velvet is the coming of age story of Nan King, an oyster girl who falls in love with a male impersonator and enters an all-consuming affair that severely alters the rest of her adult life. Packed with juicy eroticism, gender-bending, and queer love, you won’t want to put this one down.

 

7. My Secret Garden’ by Nancy friday

image via amazon

Not to be confused with the classic children’s novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Nancy Friday’s My Secret Garden is a collection of real women’s sexual fantasies gathered through letters and interviews. Originally published in 1973, this book faced its fair share of backlash from the conservative public for its shocking content, female masturbation being at the top of the list. There are some details that may make even the modern reader raise an eyebrow, including one woman’s fantasy about her neighbor’s dog. Have we piqued your curiosity yet?

Light a candle, pour a glass of wine, and crack open one of these exhilarating titles (or stimulate your senses with an audiobook version). Happy Galentine’s, ladies!

 

Featured image via Everyday Health

 

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Bookstr’s Week in Review ICYMI

Ah, February. It’s always the speediest month after the decade of January. This week is, as many of us are (sadly) aware, Valentine’s day. Fun fact: the day that follows is Single’s Awareness Day, apparently. Anyways, the ramblings of a single girl on Valentine’s Day belong on HBO and the pages of my personal journal. I promise you are still on Bookstr and not a Sex and the City script excerpt. So, what have you missed this week? Let’s find out.

If you’re WEEKS behind, here‘s what we’ve been up to recently.

 

black history month

 

February is Black History Month and everyone here at Bookstr is working hard at writing about, designing for, and (most importantly) reading the work of authors of color. Here are five female authors of color with some exciting releases. There’s a bus making the rounds in conjunction with members of the NBA. Barnes & Noble did their take on popular covers for the month’s commemorations. Lauren is filling us in here. Keep an eye out for some features coming up this month, like the 5×5 series kicking off with Black History Month as it’s inaugural theme.

 

 

every day is someone’s birthday

 

Wow, we really can’t go a week without it being somebody else’s birthday. How many can there possibly be? It’s almost like there’s more than 365 people in the world. This week saw bestselling author Ransom Riggs celebrating his 41st birthday. James Joyce’s birthday would also have been this week, alongside the publication date of Ulysses.

 

via GIPHY

 I know. These GIFs are getting less relevant as the weeks go on but I just can’t resist.

 

Not my president

 

Don’t worry, this isn’t about Trump. (He really isn’t my president, FYI, Ireland has Micheal D. Higgins.) This week we learned a little more about George Washington in a new biography. There’s a new book set for release this summer, taking a look at what could have been. If Hilary Clinton had never married Bill, where would she be now? Would 2016 have ended differently?

 

Three to read

 

I’m not sure how I’d frame my week if it wasn’t for the one constant of Nehal’s bookish wisdom. She’s back with some gems this week and they perfect for this crazy weather. Is it raining? Warm? Snowing? Who knows. You won’t care because you’ll be so engrossed in your new reads. Check it out here. For some more weather-appropriate books take a look at Kali’s recs here.

 

 

Miscellaneous/just for fun/harry styles

 

Was it the Harry Styles that got you? Don’t worry, it happens to the best of us. Kathryns got us sorted for a HS fix here. Have you ever wondered what star George Orwell was born under? Satisfy your astrological interest here. We’ve got some exciting YA releases recently that are as fun as they are anticipated (aka A LOT). Take a look here. Match up your fave 90s film with a book here, courtesy of Gina. Match up your fave bagel with a book here, courtesy of Kathryn.


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Love Letters

Grab a Tissue and Read These Love Letters to and From Famous Writers!

Love can throw you in a thousand directions. Some people mellow out completely, some people go a little crazy, and some people start out mellow and then go crazy. The first love will probably be the hardest to lose, and after that, it’s safe to say that they get better with age and experience, just like a fine wine or cheese. We have compiled a list of the eight sauciest love notes exchanged by literary all-stars.

 

The Aristocats

Via Metro

 

Zelda Fitzgerald to F. Scott Fitzgerald:

 

I look down the tracks and see you coming—and out of every haze & mist your darling rumpled trousers are hurrying to me—Without you, dearest dearest I couldn’t see or hear or feel or think—or live—I love you so and I’m never in all our lives going to let us be apart another night. It’s like begging for mercy of a storm or killing Beauty or growing old, without you. I want to kiss you so—and in the back where your dear hair starts and your chest—I love you—and I can’t tell you how much—To think that I’ll die without your knowing—Goofo, you’ve got to try to feel how much I do—how inanimate I am when you’re gone.

 

Héloïse d’Argenteuil To Peter Abélard:

 

I have your picture in my room. I never pass by it without stopping to look at it; and yet when you were present with me, I scare ever cast my eyes upon it. If a picture which is but a mute representation of an object can give such pleasure, what cannot letters inspire? They have souls, they can speak, they have in them all that force which expresses the transport of the heart; they have all the fire of our passions….

 

Honoré de Balzac to Countess Ewelina Haska, June 1835:

 

I grasp you, I kiss you, I caress you, a thousand of the most amorous caresses take possession of me. As for my heart, there you will always be — very much so. I have a delicious sense of you there. But my God, what is to become of me, if you have deprived me of my reason? This is a monomania which, this morning, terrifies me. I rise up every moment say to myself, ‘Come, I am going there!’ Then I sit down again, moved by the sense of my obligations. There is a frightful conflict. This is not a life. I have never before been like that. You have devoured everything. I feel foolish and happy as soon as I let myself think of you. I whirl round in a delicious dream in which in one instant I live a thousand years. What a horrible situation! Overcome with love, feeling love in every pore, living only for love, and seeing oneself consumed by griefs, and caught in a thousand spiders’ threads.

 

Frida Kahlo in a letter to Diego Riviera:

 

I’d like to paint you, but there are no colors, because there are so many, in my confusion, the tangible form of my great love.

 

English poet Vita Sackville-West to Virginia Woolf:

 

…I am reduced to a thing that wants Virginia. I composed a beautiful letter to you in the sleepless nightmare hours of the night, and it has all gone: I just miss you, in a quite simple desperate human way. You, with all your undumb letters, would never write so elementary a phrase as that; perhaps you wouldn’t even feel it.

 

Jean-Paul Sartre to Simone de Beauvoir:

 

Tonight I love you in a way that you have not known in me: I am neither worn down by travels nor wrapped up in the desire for your presence. I am mastering my love for you and turning it inwards as a constituent element of myself. This happens much more often than I admit to you, but seldom when I’m writing to you. Try to understand me: I love you while paying attention to external things. At Toulouse I simply loved you. Tonight I love you on a spring evening. I love you with the window open. You are mine, and things are mine, and my love alters the things around me and the things around me alter my love.

 

Lord Byron to Teresa Guiccioli:

 

In that word, beautiful in all languages, but most so in yours–Amor mio–is comprised my existence here and hereafter. I feel I exist here, and I feel I shall exist hereafter,–to what purpose you will decide; my destiny rests with you, and you are a woman, eighteen years of age, and two out of a convent. I love you, and you love me,–at least, you say so, and act as if you did so, which last is a great consolation in all events. But I more than love you, and cannot cease to love you. Think of me, sometimes, when the Alps and ocean divide us, –but they never will, unless you wish it.

 

Zelda Fitzgerald to F. Scott Fitzgerald (round two):

 

Darling – I love these velvet nights. I’ve never been able to decide … whether I love you most in the eternal classic half-lights where it blends with day or in the full religious fan-fare of mid-night or perhaps in the lux of noon. Anyway, I love you most and you ’phoned me just because you phoned me tonight – I walked on those telephone wires for two hours after holding your love like a parasol to balance me.

 

 

spongebob

Via Giphy

 

 

Feature Image Via Pinterest.