Tag: tribute

‘GoT’s Star Wants Show’s Name on His Grave

It seems the actors on Game of Thrones are just as big fans of the show as we are! According to RTE, Liam Cunningham, who plays Davos Seaworth otherwise known as ‘the Onion Knight’, wants the show’s title etched on his grave. Cunningham considers the show a tremendous honor to be on and a ‘once in a lifetime experience’. Cunningham said the fantasy drama on his resume was like a ‘calling card of quality.’

 

Liam Cunningham in character looking at camera, in forest
Image Via WikiofThrones

 

Liam Cunningham’s role as Davos has certainly entrenched him as a firm fan favorite and its a testament to his skill that Davos has not met an untimely end yet. His character has shown great nuance and multiple layers to his visage, so it makes sense Liam has such a love for his role as much as we do. The name of the show being etched onto his gravestone will likely be a worthy tribute to one of favorite actors from the show! But don’t be so quick to go yet, Cunningham, we want to see more of you once this show comes to end!

 

Featured Image Via Den of Geek 

Ursula K. LeGuin

Neil Gaiman, Margaret Atwood, and More Pay Tribute to Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin, prolific fantasy author best known for writing The Earthsea Cycle and The Hainish Cycle, passed away yesterday in her home in Portland, Oregon, at age eighty-eight. Le Guin is widely regarded as the greatest fantasy writer of her generation, and one of the greatest fantasy writers of all time, akin, some would say, to Tolkien, Lewis or any of the other leading world-builders.  

 

Le Guin, rightfully, had an absolutely enormous fanbase, including some of the most famous authors alive, including Stephen King, Michael Chabon, and Neil Gaiman. 

 

King tweeted, calling Le Guin a ‘literary icon.’

 

 

Pulitzer Prize-winner Michael Chabon posted this heartfelt message on his Instagram account, referencing his friendship with the author, who had inspired him from childhood. 

 

 

Meanwhile, fantasy giant Neil Gaiman seemed lost for words when he linked The New York Times article on LeGuin’s passing.

 

 

Later, Gaiman composed a heartfelt tribute to the author, linking a video of himself presenting LeGuin with a lifetime achievement award.

 

 

Holly Black, author of the The Spiderwick Chronicles, retweeted several tweets bemoaning the loss of LeGuin, including this one from The Demon’s Lexicon author Sarah Rees Brennan…

 

 

…and this one, from American astrobiologist and author David Grinspoon.

 

 

Margaret Atwood wrote this moving tribute to Le Guin for The Guardian, referring to her as “one of the literary greats,” and commenting that “her sane, committed, annoyed, humorous, wise and always intelligent voice is much needed now.” 

 

Ursula K. Le Guin touched the lives of millions and the depth and distance of her reach is undeniable. She will be deeply missed by everyone in the literary world. 

 

Featured Image Via Time Magazine

Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin, One of America’s Greatest Writers, Has Passed Away at 88

Ursula K. Le Guin, groundbreaking writer of the Earthsea Cycle and Hainish Cycle, passed away yesterday in her home in Portland, Oregon. She was 88-years-old.

 

Besides her Earthsea series, for which she is best known, Le Guin wrote dozens of other books that bent genre conventions. She composed poetry, wrote essay collections, and her short fiction is standard American canon today.

 

I first read Le Guin during my undergrad for a literary theory course. We had to analyze how Hegel’s master-slave dialectic manifests in Le Guin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.” I couldn’t hold on to Hegel’s thoughts once I started the story. The world Le Guin creates in those three pages is staggering, enveloping, and ultimately chilling. It reads like a $10 million Twilight Zone episode, with sweeping vistas and a heartbreaking ending. So when I found out she had an entire fantasy series (Earthsea), I jumped at it.

 

Roke, Earthsea, Ursula K. Le Guin, artwork, fan art

Roke from Earthsea. | Image Via Pinterest (P. D. White)

 

And I don’t think there’s a fantasy writer better than Le Guin. While some writers rest on action that takes thousands of pages to unfold, Le Guin instead builds a rich interiority. A lot of the action takes place in her characters’ minds. And while some fantasy writers rely on established mythology (giants, centaurs, etc.), Le Guin bucked convention. For her, magic was not about spells or a rich bloodline. To her, magic was words. If you know the right word, you can control the thing. Earthsea is, at its heart, an ode to literature and communication. Besides that, Tehanu is one of the greatest books ever written. It’s a slow-building, feminist mother-daughter story right in the center of Ged’s hero’s journey that boils into an unforgettable, inevitable ending.

 

She inspired everybody from Neil Gaiman to J. K. Rowling to Michael Chabon to Patrick Rothfuss to David Mitchell. Chances are that if you’ve read a fantasy book written in the last fifty years, it owes a great debt to Le Guin.

 

I haven’t yet read the Hainish Cycle, but I am going to pick up Rocannon’s World as soon as I can. And I cannot wait to read Earthsea again and again. I hope you’ll give Le Guin a try, if you’re not already in love.

 

Feature Image Via Variety