Tag: The Road

A group of friends toasting. To books? Possibly.

Booze & Books(tr): 7 Delicious Book & Beer Pairings

It’s Thirsty Thursday, and Bookstr is bringing you Booze & Books, our newest weekly feature dedicated to drinking games and booze-book pairings. This week, we’ll be changing it up with a booze-book pairing. Our recommendation? Any booze and any book. Since that’s a little too general, we’re going to be paring classic books with soon-to-be-classic beer. So, friends, read up & drink up. By the end of this list, these pages won’t be the only thing turnt.

Remember: drink responsibly and read voraciously!

1. Lord of the Flies – Natty Light

 

'Lord of the Flies' William Golding & Natty Light Images Via AMazon & Thrillist

 

Lord of the Flies is about a classroom full of boys getting trapped together and resorting to savagery, which sounds to me like just about every frat party I’ve ever attended. The parallels don’t end there: we can assume they didn’t have a wide variety of beverage options. And that’s what Natty Light is: not your top pick, what happens to be there, preferable to cannibalism.

 

 

2. LESS THAN ZERO – BRETT YEAST & HELLES

 

'Less Than Zero' and Brett, Yeast, & Helles

Images Via Amazon & untappd

 

Let’s get real: Less Than Zero pairs well with just about any intoxicating substance, both because that’s what the book is all about and because you might need a buzz to handle some of this violence and apathy. A disturbing tale of debauchery and indifference, Less Than Zero warns that the only thing you might want to have in common with these characters is a drink (or more). By the time the book reaches its horrific conclusion, you’ll have reached the bottom of the bottle.

 

3. anna karenina – baby daddy

 

'Anna Karenina' & Baby Daddy

Images via Goodreads & Wine Searcher

 

Unlike poor Anna, let’s hope that this Baby Daddy isn’t the reason for your untimely demise. Actually, let’s just say we hope a Baby Daddy is the only thing you and Anna have in common. Just remember that too much of a good thing is definitely, definitely a bad thing… especially if the ‘good’ thing is an extra-marital affair, in which case, it probably wasn’t that good of a thing to begin with.

 

4. 1984 – THE TRUTH

 

'1984' & The Truth

Image Via Untappd

 

The truth is that 1984 wasn’t that far off, and that would be a good punch line for a joke if it were a joke at all. Flying Dog’s  concept behind this popular beer is unabashed capitalism: “Full Disclosure: This beer came to fruition because we saw a gap in our portfolio and we wanted to increase our market share. Sometimes the truth hurts. But most often, it’s damn refreshing.”  Is this less a concept and more a statement of fact? Sure. But the idea of psychological manipulation and control is prevalent throughout 1984, making it an excellent pair. Also, this drink is as strong as you’ll want it to be.

 

5. THE ROAD – SIT DOWN SON

 

'The Road' & Sit Down Son

Images Via Amazon & Passion Vines

 

“Sit down, son,” is possibly what The Road’s unnamed father said to his unnamed son as he explained that he would, potentially, one day shoot himself with one of the family’s two rounds of ammo to avoid being eaten by cannibals. Let’s hope that this experience (that of having a beer and knowing that you’ll never force anyone to strip naked at gunpoint) is much more enjoyable.

 

6. THE HOBBIT – DRAGONS & YUMYUMS

 

'The Hobbit' Dragon & Yumyums

Images Via Amazon & Untappd

 

The Hobbit pairs perfectly with this fun, fruity ale, a comforting yet sweet taste to remind you of all your nostalgic feelings towards Tolkien’s beloved series. The beer also comes in an unusual color: a particularly vivid pink sure to remind you of summer days and the beautiful sweep of that New Zealand landscape. Hobbits pretty much live to chill with their friends, and why shouldn’t you? Crack one of these open and get (lit)erary. No one would stop you from adding some pipeweed.

 

7. FEAR & LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS – DEATH BEFORE DISCO

 

'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas' & Death Before Disco

Image Via Amazon & Lynchburg craft beer cellar

Although Fear & Loathing In Las Vegas was released in the 1970s (so, before disco, you may note) it was actually written during the 1960s. The novel depicts an intense spiritual death, the end of the hippie zeitgeist and the senseless space between generations. While the novel contains little actual death, it’s filled with an annihilation of ideas, from hotel rooms to fast cars—American symbols broken open to reveal the ugliness inside. There was plenty of death after and during disco, too, but little of it has captured so vividly. I’ll drink to that.

 

Featured Image Via The List.