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Bookstr’s Three to Read This Week 01/17/20

We hear it’s about to get really cold! So, our plans for the weekend include snuggling with a warm cup of coffee, chocolate, and a good book! Tempted? Well…

 

Check out Bookstr’s Three to Read, the three books we’ve picked for you to read this week!

HOT PICK

Come Tumbling down

by Seanan McGuire

 

Synopsis:

The fifth installment in New York Times bestselling author Seanan McGuire’s award-winning Wayward Children series, Come Tumbling Down picks up the threads left dangling by Every Heart a Doorway and Down Among the Sticks and Bones

When Jack left Eleanor West’s School for Wayward Children she was carrying the body of her deliciously deranged sister—whom she had recently murdered in a fit of righteous justice—back to their home on the Moors.

But death in their adopted world isn’t always as permanent as it is here, and when Jack is herself carried back into the school, it becomes clear that something has happened to her. Something terrible. Something of which only the maddest of scientists could conceive. Something only her friends are equipped to help her overcome.

Eleanor West’s “No Quests” rule is about to be broken.

Again.

 

Why?

Why read Come Tumbling Down? Well, who doesn’t love getting lost in a little dark fantasy every now and then? We know we sure do, especially after a long day of work! McGuires takes us back to the Moors for another scary adventure! Stuck in her psychopathic twin sister’s resurrected body, Jack goes to her friends for help. They have no other choice, but to break Eleanor West’s “No Quests” rule, one more time. But, will everyone make it out alive? Get ready to enter a vivid world because every chapter will drag you into a universe of magic! Kirkus praises this novel saying, “Come Tumbling Down is grotesque, haunting, lovely.”

 

 

Coffee Shop read

lean on me

by Pat Simmons

 

 

Synopsis:

First in an emotional, poignant romantic women’s fiction series by acclaimed inspirational romance author Pat Simmons.

No caregiver should ever have to go it alone…

Tabitha Knicely loves her career as a pharmaceutical rep, but even her health care knowledge isn’t much help with the daily challenges she now faces caring for her aunt with Alzheimer’s. Her once organized lifestyle is in disarray and her patience is tested. On Sunday mornings, when Aunt Tweet drags her to church, though Tabitha isn’t a believer, the peaceful presence of faith is a welcome relief.

Marcus Whittington believes in second chances, so he hires former inmates to staff the industrial cleaning service he owns with his brother. When a mystery woman who keeps showing up on his porch turns out to be an elderly neighbor, Marcus is outraged at what he perceives as neglect on the part of her caregiver.

Marcus soon learns that being a caregiver is a demanding, compassionate act of kindness that he has never experienced before. After several encounters with Aunt Tweet and Tabitha, his heart is drawn to the family’s distress. Marcus is determined to help Tabitha, and a friendship that started out with a grave misunderstanding soon begins to blossom into a relationship filled with love, faith, and partnership. Life is easier, when you have someone to lean on.

 

Why?

Pat Simmons plays with our emotions in this novel. She opens our eyes to the hardships of being a caregiver and how, every once in a while, we need someone to lean on. Tabitha and Marcus’ encounter may have started out with a misjudgment, but it turns into a loving and caring relationship. We guarantee you’ll be flying through these pages, both chuckling at some parts and crying at others! So, grab your box of Kleenex and get ready for an emotional rollercoaster ride like no other! Publishers Weekly acclaims Simmons writing stating “Simmons balances the sadness of Alzheimer’s with the heartwarming bonds of family and friendship, and the combination is sure to tug at readers’ heartstrings.”

dARK horse

Drew and jot: dueling doodles

by Art Baltazar

 

 

Synopsis:

Middle school best friends Andrew and Foz’s superhero comic adventure is all about saving the day! But what happens when Andrew’s sister gets her hands on the sketchbook and unleashes a new and powerful villain?

Fifth grade best friends Andrew and Foz are creating the perfect superhero crossover with the power of their imaginations! Andrew’s laser-eyed heroes Drew and Jot team up to fight Foz’s Doctor Danger, as the pair trade sketchbooks back and forth to create their action epic with new characters and new adventures. But what happens when Andrew’s little sister doodles in his sketchbook and changes the world of Drew and Jot forever? Can Andrew and Foz work together to save their creation?

Enter a brand new world of action and imagination with Eisner Award winner and New York Times bestseller Art Baltazar (Tiny Titans, Aw Yeah Comics) where every drawing has a life of its own.

 

Why?

So adults can enjoy children books right? I mean we all have a child deep inside of us, so why not? But on a serious note, this graphic novel is a perfect read for middle grade children. It shows them that it’s easy to make friends, but most importantly it takes them on an exciting adventure! Everything changes when Andrew’s little sister doodles in his sketchbook. Now Andrew and Foz must embark on their own little adventure to save their comic creations. Children are bound to love it with all its eye catching and colorful doodles, transporting them into a world of imagination and creativity.

 

 

IMAGES VIA AMAZON


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Marie Ponsot, Famous Poet, Passes Away at 98

Sad news for the literary community. According to The New York Times Marie Pronsot, a prolific poet, has passed away at aged ninety-eight. During her lifetime, the poet embarked on a long and extraordinary writing career. By the time of her death, Pronsot had translated dozens of books, published seven volumes of poetry, and served as the chancellor at the Academy of American Poets from 2010 to 2014. She passed away with her husband in New York City. She began her carer in the 1950s, where she was first published by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, a native of Yonkers who championed the Beat poetry movement.

 

Image via the New York times

Ponsot’s first notable work was True Minds, was a collection of love poems for her husband. For nearly twenty-five years, this remained her only book, as Ponsot abandoned her poetry career in order to focus on her personal life. During this time, she had become divorced from her husband, leaving her in Manhattan with seven children to raise. But despite this, she continued writing, filling her notebooks with ideas, scribblings, and poems even in the midst of her personal exile from the poetry world.

In 1981, she resumed her career after ‘finding her feet’ and titled her second collection Admit Impediment. The opening poem of the collection was a direct response to her husband, to whom her last and first collection was dedicated. The poem goes:

 

Death is the price of life.

Lives change places.

Asked why

we ever married, I smile

and mention the arbitrary fierce

glance of the working artist

that blazed sometimes in your face

but can’t picture it.

 

Image via The New York times

 

The collection went on to earn praise for its elegance, intimacy, as well as its rawness and fragility. It was followed by two sequels, the first in 1988 titled The Green Dark and the second in 1998 titled The Bird Catcher. The final one brought her National Attention, as well as increased praise and several awards. She described her process as writing ten minutes per day, pouring her life into the words and said she would encourage anyone to give poetry a go.

“Anyone can write a line of poetry. Try. That’s my word: try.”

Rest in peace, Marie Pronsot. You brought true imagination and love to the world of poetry.

 

Featured Image Via The New York Times

Meet Joy Harjo, One of the First Native American Poet Laureates!

According to The Guardian there is exciting news for the poetry world. Poet, musician, and author Joy Harjo has been appointed as the Poet Laureate, the first Native American to take the position in years. Harjo has been in the running for a role for a long time, having acted as an advocate and voice for Native Americans in the literary world. Harjo term will last one year, and she will succeed Tracy K. Smith, who served two terms in the position.

 

 

 

 

Harjo is known for poetry collections like The Woman Who Fell From the Sky and In Mad Love and War. Critics have praised her forceful, intimate writing style that draws upon the natural and spiritual world, always emphasizing and exploring man’s relationship to nature.

 

A Native American Woman stands on a lakeshore

Image via Public radio tusla

 

Harjo has expressed her political views through song and metaphor, using her poetry to draw attention to social issues. One of her poems, “Rabbit Is Up to Tricks,” epitomizes her style:

 

And Rabbit had no place to play.
Rabbit’s trick had backfired.
Rabbit tried to call the clay man back,
but when the clay man wouldn’t listen
Rabbit realized he’d made a clay man with no ears.

 

Harjo began writing in 1970, according to The New York Times. As a young woman, she attended Native American gatherings in the Southwest, where she heard poetry spoken aloud. Realizing poetry was a vehicle for social change, her art became a way for her to speak about the Native American rights movement. Since then, Harjo has written eight books in total, including poetry, memoir, and YA novels. As for her nomination, Harjo said she was in a “state of shock” and considers her a position a great honor, as well as a position of honor for all Native peoples.

In a statement to the Library of Congress, Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress said of Joy Harjo’s work “powerfully connects us to the earth and the spiritual world with direct, inventive lyricism that helps us reimagine who we are.”

In addition to being an author, Harjo is also a musician, composing four albums that speak to not only naturalistic themes but also the current political and social divides across America. She feels that poetry is a way to bridge cultures and hopes to embrace her new position.

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via The Guardian. 

Gloria Vanderbilt, Author and Fashion Icon, Passes Away at 95

An icon has passed away. Gloria Vanderbilt, according to CNNhas died at the age of ninety-five after a long battle with stomach cancer. The news was reported by her son, famous anchorman Anderson Cooper. Vanderbilt died at home, surrounded by friends and family. She had been in slowly declining health for the past few months. She was a famous socialite, fashion designer, and author, producing numerous well-known and celebrated fashion magazines. She licensed her name for numerous brands, including those that made scarves and designer jeans. Her lines were hugely successful, garnering her international fame, which was difficult for Vanderbilt due to her shyness in public. Later in her career, she branched out into art exhibitions, which included Dream Boxes and and thirty-five paintings at the Arts Center in Manchester.

 

Gloria Vanderbilt holds a cigarette in a black and white photo

Image Via Wikipedia

 

Throughout her life, Gloria Vanderbilt was also a successful novelist. During her lifetime, she wrote two books on art, four memoirs, and three novels. She was also a regular contributor to The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and Elle. Her novels include Obsession: An Erotic Tale, Never Say Goodbyeand The Memory of Starr Faithful. 

She also wrote the memoir The Rainbow Comes and Goes with her son, Anderson Cooper. The novel told about their relationship, offering an intimate glimpse into their lives, careers, and Cooper’s coming-of-age under his mother’s unconventional house rules. This book offers a portrait of two great people who dearly loved each other, making it all the more heart-wrenching to see Cooper announce his mother’s death: the memoir showcases just how strong their bond truly was behind closed doors.

 

Image via NBC

 

Gloria Vanderbilt remains an icon of design, fashion, and authorship. She will be remembered both for her forceful personality and her loving relationship with her son. It’s safe to say she made a huge mark on the world and will be remembered forever as a genuine icon!

 

 

Featured Image Via CNN.