Tag: the hunger games

Cast of Twilight and Cast of Hunger Games

The Hunger Games and Twilight Aren’t Over

Lionsgate, the film production company behind billion dollar franchises ‘Twilight’ and ‘The Hunger Games’ have said that they are interested in taking both stories further.

 

The Twilight Saga raked in $3.344 billion over its five movies, while The Hunger Games grossed $2.968 billion. 

 

 

Bella and Edward in Twilight

Image Courtesy of Freeform

 

Lionsgate CEO Jon Feltheimer said:

 

“There are a lot more stories to be told, and we’re ready to tell them when our creators are ready to tell those stories.”

 

He went on to say that the studio would only proceed with plans for more installments with the permission of ‘Twilight’ author Stephenie Meyer and ‘The Hunger Games’ author Suzanne Collins.  

 

 

Featured Image Courtesy of The Emory Wheel and CinemaBlend

Rick and Morty

7 Stories That Must Get the “Rick and Morty” Treatment

“Rick and Morty” repurposes tropes from sci-fi stories, fantasies, and all manner of adventures. Creators Justin Roiland and Dan Harmon have an eye for what’s familiar to their audience, and the irreverence to dismantle those familiarities. But that doesn’t mean they don’t need help. Here’s a list of both famous and lesser-known stories that need to, in the words of Rick Sanchez, get schwifty.

 

7. “Kaleidoscope” by Ray Bradbury

 

Kaleidoscope artwork

via Short Story Log

 

Bradbury’s short story (appearing in the 1951 collection “The Illustrated Man”) follows a free-floating astronaut whose vessel’s been decimated. With no hope of rescue, the story chronicles the astronauts final existential despair. Fun, right?

 

Why it needs to get schwifty:

 

“Rick and Morty” knows all about existential despair. I mean, Jerry.

 

via GIPHY

 

6. “We Love Deena” by Alice Sola Kim

 

We Love Deena

via Strange Horizons

 

You can read this speculative fiction short here. The lead character here can inhabit any person, and she uses this ability to, you know, stalk her ex.

 

via GIPHY

 

Why it needs to get schwifty:

 

Roiland and Harmon seem to be hung up on body displacement (e.g., Pickle Rick, Tiny Rick, etc.), and Kim has managed to do something totally unique with the concept. In “We Love Deena,” body displacement isn’t the star of the show, just a tool the main character uses to get what she wants…or maybe doesn’t get what she wants. Read the story to find out!

 

via GIPHY

 

5. “Alice in Wonderland” by Lewis Carroll

 

"Alice in Wonderland" illustration

via Medium

 

Carroll’s “Alice” books may be the archetype of trippy literature (hereafter trip-lit). Once down the rabbit hole, all that’s up is down, all that’s coffee is tea, and all that’s sense is nonsense.

 

Why it needs to get schwifty:

 

As irreverent as “Rick and Morty” is, the rules of each episode are never in question. Maybe Rick can spawn universes within universes for infinity, but the audience is never mystified by his ability to do so. There are rules. For Carroll, though, there really aren’t. Imagine “Rick and Morty” without rules.

 

Or maybe don’t. / via GIPHY

 

4. “Enemy Mine” by Barry B. Longyear

 

"Enemy Mine"

via Amazon

 

 

When two soldiers from feuding factions get stuck on a dangerous planet together, they have to overcome their differences for survival.

 

Why it needs to get schwifty:

 

Rick and Morty have made a bunch of enemies over the past couple of seasons. It’d be interesting to see one return, and have to live in seclusion with one of our leads. Perhaps a Krombopulous Michael from the multiverse will return to avenge the Gromflomite assassin.

 

via GIPHY

 

3. “The Left Hand of Darkness” by Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Left Hand of Darkness"

via Amazon

 

In Le Guin’s sci-fi classic, androgyny takes center stage. This book becomes a rumination on the effects that gender and sexuality have on societal institutions. When nobody has a fixed sex, what does society look like? Le Guin has some thoughts.

 

Why it needs to get schwifty:

 

It would be fascinating to see Roiland and Harmon explore this idea. It’s a big topic at the moment, and the always-playful philosophy of “Rick and Morty” would be interesting to say the least.

 

via GIPHY

 

2. “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” by Jules Verne

 

20000 leagues under the sea

via LRM

 

Captain Nemo’s aquatic voyage has captured imaginations for over a century. A variety of underwater locales are explored, all through the lens of the bizarre lifestyle led by those in the Nautilus.

 

Why it needs to get schwifty:

 

We’ve seen Rick everywhere from space, to foreign planets, to wacky spaceships, and even inside human bodies. But what about discovering the mysteries of the deep blue sea? Who knows what Roiland and Harmon will bring us from the abyss…

 

via GIPHY

 

1. “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins

 

"Hunger Games" cover

via Amazon

 

In a futuristic dystopian version of the U.S., tributes from across the dozen districts must battle to the death. Romances bloom, feuds are born, and the ravenous Capitol audience is satiated.

 

Why it needs to get schwifty:

 

Seeing Rick and Morty stripped of their gadgets, forced to make the most of very little would be supremely enticing. Plus, we might get to see what Rick would do with a bow and arrow. Could he beat Katniss Everdeen?

 

via GIPHY

 

Feature image courtesy of Den of Geek.

Katniss Everdeen and Piggy

Perfect Couples From Different Books

While true love is timeless, and generally knows no bounds, things get complicated when the perfect pair lives in different books. Luckily, we’re happy to play matchmaker, and point compatible characters in each other’s directions.

 

Here are some potential romances we’d love to see blossom:

 

1. Katniss Everdeen from “The Hunger Games” and Piggy from “Lord of the Flies”

 

Katniss Everdeen and Piggy

via Playbuzz and Tumblr

 

Piggy is near and dear to any good book lover’s heart. Savagely squashed beneath a boulder, Piggy had been a symbol of unity amongst his vicious comrades. He might be under a rock, but we think crossing paths with Katniss would give him a different sort of crush.

 

via GIPHY

 

As the Mockingjay, Katniss is also a symbol of unity. Imagine discovering that commonality on Tinder. “Hey, you also represent hope to a dispossessed populace? No way!”

 

2. Don Quixote and Luna Lovegood from “Harry Potter”

 

Don Quixote and Luna Lovegood

via Stefan Mart and Harry Potter Wiki

 

These two daydreamers are known believers in the unbelievable, but the prospect of their romance would make even the most cynical soul believe in true love. If anyone can share in Don Quixote’s delusions, it would surely be Luna Lovegood.

 

Luna Lovegood wearing funny goggles

Those goggles could make any windmill look like a giant / via Pinterest

 

The age gap may be a little troublesome, but perhaps they can just imagine they’re closer in age. Remember, the power of imagination is limitless.

 

Spongebob making a rainbow with his hands.

via Nick

 

3. Marvin the Paranoid Android from “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” and Holden Caulfield from “The Catcher in the Rye”

 

Marvin and Holden Caulfield

via Polyvore and Erin Entrada Kelly

 

One of the most depressed, cynical lifeforms in the galaxy is Marvin the Paranoid Android. The other is a 16-year-old boy in Pennsylvania who really hates…pretty much the entire human race. Holden Caulfield might find love in a nonhuman, though. Who better to set him up with than Marvin? If ever Holden has concerns about the migration patterns of New York City ducks, then Marvin will give him the answer he most craves, but one of the best examples of this comes from the “Hitchhiker’s Guide” movie…

 

Arthur Dent: Marvin, any ideas?
Marvin: I have a million ideas. They all point to certain death.

 

4. Lady Macbeth and James Bond

 

Lady Macbeth and James Bond

via Twitter

 

There may not be a woman better suited to be a Bond girl than Lady Macbeth. If Bond was to get on her bad side, she wouldn’t hesitate to cut him down to size. She might like him better than Macbeth anyway since he doesn’t have any hang-ups with ghosts. Plus, they’re both Scottish.

 

James Bond holding a gun

“A medium dry martini, lemon peel. Shaken, not stirred–what’s that, dear? Nevermind. Just a seltzer.” / via Playbuzz

 

5. Lisbeth Salander from “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and Sherlock Holmes

 

Lisbeth Salander and Sherlock Holmes

via Los Angeles Time and Epic Reads

 

Sherlock Holmes likes tricky women like Irene Adler, and Lisbeth Salander likes troubled sleuths like Mikail Blomkvist. Salander’s expert hacking is a tricky prospect indeed, but Holmes is no stranger to possibly unsavory behavior (like being addicted to cocaine). Plus, if this romance is adapted by Hollywood, it would unite Benedict Cumberbatch and Rooney Mara…finally.

 

via GIPHY

 

6. Tigger from “The House at Pooh Corner” and Shere Khan from “Jungle Book”

 

Tigger and Shere Khan

via Disney

 

There are so many wonderful things about Tiggers that there’s a whole song about it.

 

 

But does Shere Khan deserve him? Sure, he’s a murderous bully, but every ferocious feline has got a cute house cat beneath the surface. He just needs a bouncy, trouncy, flouncy, pouncy tiger life partner to bring out his sensitive side.

 

Now let’s hear from you. What characters from different books do you want to see get together?

 

Featured image courtesy of The Mary Sue and Tumblr

Picture of Dragonstone, highlighting the beach in the front and a few of the dragons flying to the keep.

5 Fictional Places We Wish Were Real

It’s only the middle of the week and you are waiting to go to the beach or counting down the days until vacation. For some, maybe you’re just waiting for the weather to not be so humid.

 

But some of our favorite books provide even better summer escape destinations. If only these were real…

 

1. The Capitol from “The Hunger Games”

Image of The Capitol, which shows a sleek city in daylight, highlighting a modern bridge.

Image courtesy of Pinterest

 

Yes, absolutely, it’s a symbol of oppression and tyranny, but it also seems like a technological paradise. The Capitol lifestyle is needlessly excessive, but some of the excesses are pleasant. For instance, imagine finishing an entrée at a restaurant only to realize your date’s meal tastes better. The Capitol’s got you covered: just drink their special concoction, and you have room for a second dinner. Second dinner! Imagine that.

 

2. Rivendell from “The Lord of the Rings”

Image of Rivendell, which is a nice city perched in a valley, surrounded by waterfalls.

Image courtesy of Vanderstelt Studio

 

Whether in the movies or the books, Rivendell is the perfect postcard destination. Relax in a small city perched in a deep valley, listen to water rushing down from dizzying heights or walk along the gorgeous bridges connecting the various buildings. Some serious business may be being discussed by the Council of Elrond, but numerous great writers have also found this location to be a killer spot to write. Bilbo Baggins is just one!

 

3. Octavia from “Invisible Cities”

Illustration of Octavia, which is a bunch of buildings suspended over a mountain.

Image courtesy of Pinterest

 

Italo Calvino’s “Invisible Cities” contains dozens of descriptions of fascinating locales. Per Marco Polo’s description, Octavia sounds especially mind-bending. It’s a city suspended over an abyss, described to be like a spider-web. Sure, it’ll fall at any moment, but a short weekend getaway might be exciting. Imagine coming out of work and looking down at nothingness. Breathtaking!

 

4. The Ministry of Magic from “Harry Potter”

Picture of the Ministry of Magic, which features a big statue of a gryffin in the center of a complex.

Image courtesy of Pottermore

 

Getting caught in rush hour is frankly soul crushing. Whether it’s a messed up train schedule or bumper-to-bumper traffic, the commute can often be the most harrowing part of the work day.

 

Nevertheless, magic may prove to be the answer to all these problems. Just hop into a fireplace (unlit preferably), use some Floo Powder, and, poof, you’re home from work. Imagine having offices in The Ministry of Magic! The idea of avoiding the evening rush is the most magical gift J.K. Rowling has bestowed.

 

5. Dragonstone from “Game of Thrones”

Picture of Dragonstone from Game of Thrones, which is a stark looking fortress overlooking an ocean.

Image courtesy of Game of Thrones Wiki

 

The massive walkway can be tiresome, but stumbling upon a vacant fortress would be a nice change of pace. Between the gorgeous dragon engravings and beachfront view, Dragonstone makes a splendid gothic getaway. It’s an especially welcome change if you’ve just come from Meereen and are staging a coup for the Seven Kingdoms. We can all relate to that.

 

Featured image courtesy of Daily Dot