Tag: the fault in our stars

Five Flawless Fault in our Stars Memes

I know it’s still too soon, but I also think it might always be, so let’s do this – sure, the book is serious, but we can still laugh. And we will. Because this is the internet, and if I know nothing else, I know for certain that there are memes about everything. Let’s laugh at some sad ones.

 

it Really is the Stars

Image via MemeDroid

This is actually like getting hit with an air cannon or something. How do you come up with this? How did no one else? This is devastating. Obviously the original quote is about making bad choices, and the quote in this book is about how sometimes things are out of our control, but this? This is just taking things to another level of irreverence. The cancer constellation? Absolutely devastating. No comeback possible.

 

Okay?

Image via A Girl Who Reads

Oh, these seagulls. It really is like a room full of John Green fans. What can they get themselves caught on like the beaks in the sail? Hazel’s breathing tube? I never really got the always thing, since Isaac and what’s-her-name were a terrible couple. And ok? I should stop, or the seagulls would come for me, but I thought the premise of ‘okay’ had some minor flaws, imo. Don’t kill me, okay? Okay. Please.

 

Cannon

Image via MEME

Why is this just a screenshot of the movie, you might ask? I kid. That IV is like the size of his entire body. And no one wanted to take his glasses off? They don’t have bee beds? Bee doctors? I’m sorry to go off on a tangent, but this movie raises so many questions. And is that IV filled with honey? I confess to knowing very little about bees, but I’m sure, if nothing else, they don’t have honey for blood.

 

Is That the Look?

Image via Pinterest

Alright, I know you guys all love this guy, and I’m not judging. But he has NO moves. No moves at all. He sees a pretty girl and he just STARES at her. I know she’s flattered, but I think it’s a little rude objectively. I don’t think we really needed evidence this book isn’t set in New York, but this is it. That staring thing would NOT fly, let me tell you. The fake smoking thing DEFINITELY wouldn’t fly. I don’t remember where this is set, I’m sorry, but you can get away with a lot.

 

Irony

Image via Pinterest

Ok sure, it’s irony, or something, but it’s also true. And this isn’t the only example. She’s sicker, but he dies first. Too soon? You know that’s what I was going for. Plus, you know, in the beginning, she says something about not believing in sugar coating, but the love story is mad sugar coated. I’m not hating! I’m just saying. Romanticizing love and romanticizing death have always gone hand in hand. Why not here?

Featured image via Hypeable 

Five Fearless Divergent Memes

There are so many directions to go with divergent, but even ignoring the fact that her brother goes on to play her boyfriend, there’s so much. What faction are you? Honestly, I want some “My Life as a Background Slytherin” style content about what it would be like to just be kind of… chilling in Dauntless while Tris does all this dramatic stuff?

Asking the Real Questions

Image via AwwMemes

Listen. Listen. I know there’s probably a reason you invited me to your apartment. But you have to understand. I have two interests in this life. I want your wifi, and I want to know if you have a pet. A cat that wants to walk back and forth between my feet? A dog who wants to rest its head on my knees? Even a bird or a fish or something, I guess. But as long as you have wifi, I do really have all I need. Tell your dogs I love them.

 

They’re so Tough

Image via Pinterest

Literally, how do these people function? What on earth is Candor society? You’d know everything about everyone! How do you bounce back from that? It’s worse than living in a small town! I wouldn’t even mind about telling the truth, I don’t think, but knowing things? What a nightmare. I’d rather be in Amity, where they very clearly know nothing. Except how to farm. They truly are the Huffleepuffs of the Divergent series.

 

Meta

Image via WeHeartIt

Look, not to be that guy, but it’s definitely not a metaphor. It’s not even actually ironic. It’s maybe just a little bit on the nose, honestly. Plus, I’ve got serious questions about Four’s name. When Tris arrives in Dauntless, they tell her she’s gotta use a name FOREVER. She’s never been in the fear simulation. So how did he know he’d have four fears under the same circumstances? He didn’t know yet! How was he named before he had a reason to be named that?

 

No One Likes You!

Image via BookBub

It really, really should have been. No one even likes that guy! He’s literally the worst. I might be forgetting someone, but I’m going to go ahead and call him the worst brother in literature. And honestly, all these people know Tris. How do they not see her choices coming and prevent them? It’s like the high stakes version of me and my best friend trying to spy vs spy pay for lunch. Of course she was going to try to sacrifice herself. It’s what she does!

 

No Talent, One Talent

Image via Tumblr

It’s only a flesh wound, I’ll bite your ankles off! It’s true, though. And I get that they’re sort of like cops or whatever, but what does a society that’s not at war need a fifth of their people in the military for? Look, I know the experiment was designed this way, I know, but the internal logic? Spotty at best. How much violence can there possibly be to stop? Who’s the head of the government again? Barty Crouch Junior? Constant vigilance!

Featured image via BallMemes

‘Looking for Alaska’ Hulu Adaptation Release Date Announced

Fans have been anxiously awaiting the release of Hulu’s latest adaptation, Looking for Alaska, based on John Green’s novel. Well, wait no more! The release date was officially announced at BookCon over the weekend.

Josh Schwartz, producer of the series, ended the ‘John Green’s Looking for Alaska’ panel by announcing that all eight episodes of Hulu’s new series would be available October 18th. Hulu has had much success with book-to-screen adaptations, like 11/22/63 and, more recently, Catch-22. This will be the third time one of Green’s books finds its way to the screen. This comes as no shock, seeing as both The Fault in Our Stars and Paper Towns had significant success.

 

The cast of Hulu's 'Looking for Alaska'
IMAGE VIA TV INSIDER

Looking for Alaska captures the life of Miles “Pudge” Halter after he is brought into Alaska Young’s world at boarding school. Captivated by the beauty just down the hall, his life will never be the same. The book has been nominated for several awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Young Adult Fiction.

Joining Schwartz for the panel event was John Green, Stephanie Savage, Charlie Plummer, and Kristine Froseth. Are you excited for the latest John Green adaptation?

featured image via den of geek

‘The Fault in Our Stars’ Director to Bring Stephen King’s ‘The Stand’ to TV

Following the huge success of the movie IT and the excitement for the upcoming Pet Semetary, Stephen King’s The Stand is being adapted as a TV mini-series. The Stand will include approximately ten episodes and will be available on CBS all access. 

 

tv poster for the stand

Image Via Highlight Hollywood 

The Stand will be directed by Josh Boone, who is huge fan of King.. When asked about the work in progress he stated:

“I wrote King a cameo as himself in my first film and have been working to bring The Stand to the screen for five years. I’ve found incredible partners in CBS All Access and Ben Cavell.” 

Ben Cavell who is working with Boone will be executive producing and writing the script.  Boone goes onto describe a touching moment from his childhood, after his parents had burned his copy of the The Stand.

“I read The Stand under my bed when I was twelve, and my Baptist parents burned it in our fireplace upon discovery. Incensed, I stole my Dad’s FedEx account number and mailed King a letter professing my love for his work. Several weeks later, I came home to find a box had arrived from Maine, and inside were several books, each inscribed with a beautiful note from God Himself, who encouraged me in my writing and thanked me for being a fan. My parents, genuinely moved by King’s kindness and generosity, lifted the ban on his books that very day.” 

The Stand is set during the apocalypse, when a super-virus that leaked from a lab wipes out most of the population, leaving the survivors to decide between what is good and what is evil, plunging them into not only a battle for survival, but also a battle of morals.

 

Stephen king at press conference

Image Via La Boucle

King expressed his own excitement for the new series:

“I’m excited and so very pleased that The Stand is going to have a new life on this exciting new platform. The people involved are men and women who know exactly what they’re doing; the scripts are dynamite. The result bids to be something memorable and thrilling. I believe it will take viewers away to a world they hope will never happen.”

King’s spine-chilling work always delivers and we will be looking out for this one!

 

Featured Image Via ew.com

picture

I Tried the Penguin-Mini Books and I Have a Lot of Thoughts

I never thought I’d be reading a book the size of the first iPod Touch until I came across the latest editions of John Green’s bestselling books. Marketed as Penguin Minis, these books have text that reads horizontally with onion-thin pages flipping upward. As a person who loves to lug books around, this would be a perfect option in theory. In execution, I was completely wrong. 

 

I never thought I would hate a book format more than a poorly designed e-book, but Penguin Minis have come along to prove me very, very wrong. The point of these books is to be super easy to handle. Apparently, the “revolutionary landscape design and ultra-thin paper makes it easy to hold in one hand.” While I will admit that the book itself feels quite nice to hold in such a nontraditional way, trying to read the pages and flip from page to page is near impossible. The pages are so thin that there is no way I can successful grab onto only one, instead flipping an entire chapter. 

 

CHONKY

GIF Via The New York Times

 

The text size is nothing to complain about unless you’re not used to reading mass market paperbacks with similarly thin pages and smaller print than typical paperback books or if you have particularly bad eyesight. I took issue with my bad eyesight combined with the small font and the thin pages. From a distance, it was hard to keep track of where I was on the page as the words from the pages before ghosted onto the page I was reading.

 

F R O N D

Photo via Emily Hering

 

On top of all of this, there are twenty-five skin-thin pages at the end of the book just hanging out. What does Penguin and John Green expect me to do with these? Write notes in them? Doodle my interpretation of Gus’s pre-funeral? Write my riveting review of the novel? What is the purpose of these twenty-five blank pages? 

 

 

In conclusion, would I purchase a Penguin Mini again? Absolutely not. They may be perfect for reading on the subway during rush hour, but the thinness of the pages makes reading a two-handed activity, even for the most agile of readers. I will give them credit and say that it is probably one of the cutest books I will ever own and it will look preciously displayed on my bookshelf. It may just be a case of a format that Americans aren’t quite used to and with an audience that isn’t quite ready for another revolution in literary distribution, this time in the form of palm-sized books. 

 

 

Maybe next time, Penguin. 

 

 

Featured Image via Washington Post