Tag: the color purple

Why the ‘Strong Black Woman’ Trope is Both Worn-Out and Dangerous

This Women's History Month, we explain the strong black woman trope and look at not only how played out it is, but why it's extremely dehumanizing.

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Book Adaptations on Hulu You Should Definitely Check Out

On July 1st, Hulu added "The Color Purple," "Beloved," and "Mary Shelley" to their ever-increasing catalog of movies. All three are based on either the works or the lives of famous female writers, and all three are recommended for fans of the books, or for people interested in learning more about these great classics.

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Alice Walker Quotes To Inspire Your Wednesday

Alice Walker, the critically acclaimed author of The Color Purple, is certainly an inspiring presence in the literary world. Her moving stories speak to the fragility of the human experience and her colorful writing encourages us to find the beauty in every moment.

This Black History Month, we celebrate the men and women who have greatly shaped history by providing indispensable contributions to countless dimensions of society; Alice Walker’s literary talents and accomplishments are nothing less than extraordinary. Here are seven of her poignant quotes that will inspire you this Wednesday.

image via the new yorker
  1. “No person is your friend who demands your silence, or denies your right to grow.”

2. “I have learned not to worry about love; but to honor its coming with all my heart.” – Revolutionary Petunias

 

 

3. “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don’t notice it. People think pleasing God is all God care about. But any fool living in the world can see it always trying to please us back.”    – The Color Purple 

4. “The more I wonder, the more I love.” – The Color Purple 

5. “Part of what existence means to me is knowing the difference between what I am now and what I was then.” – In Search of Our Mothers Gardens 

 

 

6. “Keep in mind always the present you are constructing. It should be the future you want.” – The Temple of My Familiar 

7. “Don’t wait around for other people to be happy for you. Any happiness you get you’ve got to make yourself.”

8. “I believe in movements, collective action to influence the future.” – You Can’t Keep a Good Woman Down 

9. “Expect nothing. Live frugally on surprise.” – Revolutionary Petunias 

Featured image via imgur

 


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Were These Books Fairly Banned?

Why is it that the most philosophical books are often the most controversial?

Literature that makes audiences question the basic fabric of society is known to be the most profound. Questioning our current atmosphere is what allows humanity to develop intellectually. Yet, it’s only normal for people to fear the questioning of society, as history shows that it frequently leads to change.

There are a few books that come to mind that pose an abundance of deep, philosophical questions. Yet, institutions around the world, from school curriculums to entire nations, have banned them for various reasons. Granted, these books are filled with content not usually suitable for adolescents, but in the right context with teachers who know the right way to communicate these topics to their students, they can have an incredible impact.

These are some of the most famous controversial books that have also been banned in a few areas.

 

 

Animal Farm

 

Image Via Amazon
Author: George Orwell

The famous novella about the corruption of socialist ideals in the Soviet Union was, of course, banned in the Stalinist USSR. Its position as a banned book has lasted far beyond the fall of the Berlin Wall. It’s still banned in North Korea and Cuba for similar reasons as to why it was banned in the Soviet Union. Strangely enough, it was even banned in the United Arab Emirates for portraying a talking pig, which was seen as conflicting with Islamic ideas.

 

The Color Purple

 

Image Via Wikipedia
Author: Alice Walker

Although this book has received both the National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize, it has continually been confronted and banned for it’s highly controversial content, such as social and sexual explicitness. Although the novel does consist of abuse and sexual assault, it’s a central part of the narrative, and it is what makes the book so genuine. In spite of all the controversies, however, the book was adapted into a movie in 1985, starring Whoopi Goldberg and Oprah Winfrey.

 

The Catcher in the Rye

 

Image Via Amazon
Author: JD Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye is a unique novel in that it is one of the most frequently banned books, yet one of the most taught throughout American schools. The book is banned because it depicts teenage rebellion, and its portrayal of debauchery, drinking, and defiance. Yet, defenders of the novel see it as the pinnacle of the frustrations and mental dilemmas of the teenage years. The protagonist Holden Caulfield depicts genuine thoughts of the loss of authenticity as we get older, and has become an integral part of English curriculums around the world.

 

American Psycho

 

Image Via Goodreads
Author: Bret Easton Ellis

This book centers around an unstable investment banker who describes his daily activities, such as taking drugs and going to nightclubs. It soon becomes clear that he is mentally unstable, thus making him an unreliable narrator. Though the book does develop into more of a satire, there is a lot of graphic detail of murder, rape, and cannibalism. It’s no wonder that the book is banned in various areas. According to ABC News, the book cannot be sold to anyone under the age of eighteen in Australia. American Psycho was also highly denounced by feminist activist Gloria Steinem for portraying violence towards women.

 

What do you guys think? Have these books been fairly criticized? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

Featured Image Via The Movie Database

Lucius & Draco, fucked up father & fucked up progeny

The 7 Baddest Dads from Literature

Bad dads are a massive inspiration when it comes to literature and media, a broad spectrum of general douchebaggery that ranges from King Triton’s overbearing & possessive nature to Anakin Skywalker’s… well, everything. Luke, I am the source of all your issues going into adulthood! The ones that aren’t actively bad are frequently absent or neglectful, perfect fodder for creating plot conflict or generating sympathy for the protagonist. So, happy Father’s Day weekend to the dads that don’t suck! While we could never compile each and every one of literature’s shittiest dads, these seven will make even the most mediocre among you glow in comparison.

(Obviously, spoiler alert for all the books featured below!)

 

 

1. KING LAIUS

OEDIPUS Rex

 

 

Oedipus, the original motherfucker

Image Via Tv Tropes

 

 

Yup, it’s Oedipus’ dad—one of the only dads worse than Oedipus himself, whose behavior invited some intense scrutiny upon his two daughters, Ismene and the badass Antigone. It’s pretty f*cked up to abandon your child on top of a mountain, even if you HAVE heard he’s going to kill you and then nail your sexy wife, Jacosta. We all know that Oedipus’ fulfilment of the prophecy actually came about because of this blunder: not knowing his parentage, he murdered his father and bedded his mother without any recognition of what he’d done. But even if you’re pro-hillside-abandonment and think it was a justifiable move, why didn’t Laius just kill the kid and save everyone a lot of trouble???

 

2. King Lear

King Lear

 

 

Ian McKellen as King Lear

Image Via PBS

 

 

With enormous power comes an enormous chance of being a d*ck to your children. We’ve heard of divorced daddies’ cliche-riddled ploys to buy their children’s love. Lear actually expects his three daughters to buy his love, saying that Goneril loves him twice as much as Reagan because she offers twice the number of soldiers. He also calls his daughters “unnatural hags,” which we imagine is an untrue statement, given the lack of Sharpie brows and lip fillers back in Shakespeare’s day. Also, maybe Reagan and Goneril would have gotten along better (and hated their father a lot less) if Lear hadn’t obviously favored Cordelia. Some people say the play is an exploration of nature versus nurture, but there wasn’t really a whole lot of nurturing.

 

3. Humbert Humbert

Lolita

 

 

Humbert Humbert & Lo

Image Via Heard Tell

 

 

And here’s Humbert Humbert at number three, proving that this list is not in order of sh*ttiness. Humbert Squared is an evil pedophile who tricks a woman into marrying him so that he can have easy access to her twelve-year-old daughter, Lo—a girl he calls Lolita. When the girl’s mother discovers Humbert’s perverted motives in his journal, she runs to spread the news and is hit by an oncoming car. Humbert destroys the journal pages and takes legal custody of Lo, a position of power he abuses to coerce her into sex with gifts and threats that life would be far worse in an orphanage.

 

4. LUCIUS MALFOY

The Harry Potter Series

 

 

Lucius Malfoy, shit dad

Image Via Elite Daily

 

 

My parents sure didn’t let me get a tattoo when I was in my senior year of high school. Now, obviously that’s secondary to raising your child in a cult centered around the concept of blood purity. While every parent has a responsibility to keep their children safe, Lucius got involved with Magic Manson, an irresistible leader so dangerous that he’d be safer in jail than facing Voldy’s wrath. (Not to mention, of course, that’s he’s obviously a massive racist and literal slaveowner who mistreated Dobby.) He also tried to force his son to murder someone, either by dangling the carrot of his approval in front of Draco’s nose or by reminding him, helpfully, that Voldemort would likely kill Draco if he failed.

 

5. MR. WORMWOOD

Matilda

 

 

Mr. Wormwood, ass

image Via Matilda Fan Wiki

 

 

Ideally, fathers would share words of wisdom with their children. Apparently, some say: “I’m right & you’re wrong. I’m big & you’re small, and there’s nothing you can do about it.” Ideally, fathers would embody the values that they want from their children. Apparently, some sell dangerously broken cars to customers that will run for ten minutes and then break down. Mr. Wormwood is a verbally abusive sh*tbag who happily abandons his child with a random schoolteacher he doesn’t personally know. Is Matilda better off with Miss Honey? Um, obviously. Is it still pretty messed up that he didn’t care at all about keeping his only daughter? ABSOLUTELY.

 

6. ALPHONSO

The Color Purple

 

 

'The Color Purple' Alphonso, leering

Image via The Color Purple Blogspot

 

Here’s a heads up that this depiction of parental abuse is pretty graphic. Considering that Humbert Humbert is on the list and THIS one needs a disclaimer, you can imagine the level of violence. Alphonso beats and violates his daughter, Celie, which has resulted twice in pregnancy. The first child, he took to the woods and murdered. Her father also steals the second child and takes a second wife—though he still keeps Celie close and abuses her physically. Despite his fixation on Celie, Alphonso frequently calls his daughter ugly and gives her away to a man who doesn’t love her. And the icing on the f*cked-up cake? Alphonso isn’t really Celie’s father: he’s her stepfather, pretending to be her father in order to inherit her deceased mother’s property.

 

 

7. VALENTINE MORGENSTERN

The mORTAL inSTRUMENTS sERIES

 

 

Valentine Morgenstern

Image Via FREEFORM

 

 

The devil’s in the details, and Valentine certainly didn’t miss the smallest one. He fed demon blood instead of Gerber’s fruit goo to his firstborn Jonathan Christopher, basically guaranteeing that the newborn would be an unhinged, child-murdering sociopath for the rest of his life. After his wife ran off with their daughter, Valentine found a RANDOM CHILD (Jace), convinced Jace that he was Jace’s real father, and then faked his own death violently in front of the kid. When Valentine reappears and finds Jace and his daughter Clary, he lets them (falsely!!!) believe they’re biological siblings—which is definitely a problem, since they’ve been dating. Oh yeah, and Valentine also murdered Jace’s pet hawk before telling the boy: “to love is to destroy, and to be loved is to be the one destroyed.” Is that the reason Jace has a reputation of sleeping around? Who knows? It’s not like that kid ever saw a therapist.

 

 

Featured Image Via Tor.