Tag: tbr

Bookish Tweets To Celebrate UK World Book Day

So, if you want yet another reason to dedicate your whole day (if you can) to reading, then consider this argument for all of the books in your “To Be Read” pile collecting dust on your shelves…

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Celebrate Delhi with These Indian Authors

New Delhi became India’s capital 89 years ago today, so here are five books, some from my own TBR, by Indian authors and set in India. Sorry there aren’t 89. Maybe next year.

 

The Devourers – Indra Das

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Spanning India and its history, this story tells of a race of people reminiscent of werewolves. Don’t take any lore for granted though, because the Devourers are a race all their own, and you, like the main character, might find yourself taking risks for the chance to learn this story’s end.

From my own TBR.

 

The Liar’s Weave – Tashan Mehta

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Zahan is born without a future. This is kind of a problem. It’s more of a problem when he discovers what this means – that any lies he tells can become reality. Every power has a price, and the more lies he tells, the more acute the danger.

 

The Simoquin Prophecies – Samit Basu

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Both a play on and a send up of classic fantasy, read this if you love that vibe but don’t mind sincere irony, or some Monty Python vibes counterbalancing the dyed in the wood fantasy elements. Sure, there’s a prophecy, but that doesn’t mean the book has to be predictable.

 

The Palace of Illusions – Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

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Following a heroine of the Mahabharata, this is so much more than a retelling. Marriage, magic, war, and fate, appreciate the classic epic through a new lens and learn that navigating love, fate, and the will of the gods is never simple.

From my TBR

 

Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights

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A story about the descendants of the jinn and the unraveling of reason, Salman Rushdie can always be trusted to write something extraordinary – drawing here from mythology and the modern day both. Wasn’t on my TBR, but it is now.


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Featured image via Martin Brown Photography

Five Ways to Fight Reader’s Block

Do you live under the looming weight of the sword of Damocles that is your TBR pile? Does it watch you day and night, unconquerable and ever growing? Do you fear you’ll be crushed one day if you close a door too hard? This article is for you.

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Image via Dr. Bristol’s Prescription

It happens to all of us. Plenty of good books to read, at least a little time (there’s always time for books), and yet, do books get read? There are a thousand comics about how many MORE books we’ll buy, even when the TBR pile starts to take on a life of its own. I don’t know what’s to be done about that, but I do know some tricks for getting out of a slump and back to what matters.

 

Read Something Shorter

Image via Deposit Photos

It can work! Have you been reading every LOTR book back to back like I tried to when I was twelve? I was a FOOL, and you are too, no offense. I know why you’re not reading. Get yourself out of a rut with something lighter, or even just physically smaller. I like to pick up poetry chapbooks for this, but anything will do, poetry, short stories – try and pick something with bite sized pieces, so you can feel accomplishment with much less focus.

 

Borrow from the Library

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Image via Stamma

I know, I know, you have them in your house! But hear me out. No, It’s not about the fines, though I obviously don’t want to pay the fines either. If I keep library books too long, I feel bad! They expected it back! Someone might be waiting for it! I gotta get it back on time. This might be more of a me thing, but do you want to let librarians down? Please. The ticking clock might lead you to finish the book quickly. Plus, checking out books proves that people use libraries, making it harder to cut their funding.

 

Try Audio Books

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Image via Medium

I’ve never been an audio book person – at least since I was a kid – but they’re great for reader’s block, or if you’re super busy. You can cook, or clean the house, or listen on the bus. Plus, if you just don’t find yourself reading, an audio book takes almost no effort to experience. If you’ve ever felt like you don’t read like you used to when you were a kid, this might be a good way to get back in your stride, and quickly check a few things off your TBR.

Also, and you didn’t hear it from me, you can get audio books from libraries for free. Ask a librarian!

 

Try a New Genre

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Have a huge pile of science fiction you can’t seem to get through? Maybe grab a biography or a graphic novel. Too much historical fiction got you confused on who had affairs in real life and who was made up? Read some manga or get a book that’s pure fiction. If your book is already all biographies or something, try something a little less dry, throw a thriller or some high fantasy in the mix. Maybe even a genre you really don’t read. Shake it up!

 

Reread a Favorite

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Image via Book Riot

Everyone has a handful of books they could read a thousand times. Even if it doesn’t feel productive, rereading a book you love can get you back in the swing of things, and remind you what you love so much about reading. Plus, it’s always nice to revisit an amazing book, whatever the reason. After that, you can go on and find a new favorite book, or three. I miss reading. Let’s get on this, friends.


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Literary Canon Update

Have you ever been given a reading list that’s written, translated, and selected exclusively by and for men? Odds are you’ve rarely seen any that aren’t. If you want to appreciate the cannon while also living in a world where women exist, this is the list for you. These books and translations are some of the best and most lauded of all time, and yes, they’re by women.

It was, I must confess, a little hard to compile. The Odyssey was first translated by a woman only in 2017! But don’t despair. It’s all here for the taking.

 

The Iliad and the Odyssey

 

Homer’s epics have been translated MANY times, but these, by Caroline Alexander and Emily Wilson, respectively, set an incredible standard.

 

The Iliad

 

 

Close as can be to the ancient Greek, this translations has garnered heaping praise. “[T]he guard has changed, and a new gold standard has appeared”, said New Criterion at the volume’s publication. This edition even manages to retain the original line numbers from the Greek.

 

The Odyssey

 

 

This work, too, matches the original Greek as closely as possible. “A staggeringly superior translation―true, poetic, lively and readable, and always closely engaged with the original Greek”, said Harvard classics professor Richard F. Thomas. Iambic pentameter imitates the lyricism of the original Greek, and the volume also includes translation guides and maps.

 

 

Antigonik and An Oresteia

 

 

For both of these it is possible to turn to Anne Carson, a Canadian translator and classics professor. Carson’s translations are modern, elegant, and never condescending. In stead of translated, the works seem brought into the light, with all their strangeness and fierceness intact.

 

 

Jane Austen

 

How is it that Jane Austen, often the only woman on a reading list, is still under hyped? I had a guy in a bar tell me once that if people like Austen it’s because they haven’t read a lot of books. He really said that. Family conflict, human stories, and scathing humor makes Austen worth reading, with characters you really will love, and hate.

 

Pride & Prejudice

 

It’s a staple for a reason, and if you’re not sure you’ll relate to these people’s problems, you’re wrong. Fuckboys, impending poverty, poor decisions, and character growth you can get behind. Plus, it may be a period piece, but people still love their sisters. You’ll relate.

 

 

Jane Eyre

 

 

Another classic people want to avoid, but it has everything: deaths, fire, lies, weddings, blindness. I wouldn’t exactly call Jane a relateable character, but she’s understandable, I think, when you see everything she’s been through. And she’s incredibly decisive.

 

 

 

Images via Amazon