Tag: tattoos

sylvia

7 Meaningful Sylvia Plath Tattoos

Sylvia Plath is a figure of both tragedy and genius. A pioneer of the confessional poetry genre and posthumous Pulitzer Prize-winner, she lived to be only thirty-years-old. Plath’s raw depiction of her personal struggles continues to resonate with many who share her feelings. All readers carry the impact of writing that touches them, but these seven tattoos help people to keep Plath’s words especially close.

 

The Bell Jar (1963)

 

Tattoo from 'The Ball Jar' reads: "I am, I am, I am"

Image via popsugar.com

 

1. “I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”

 

Fig tree tattoo inspired by Sylvia Plath's 'The Bell Jar'

Image via loadtv.biz

 

2. I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked… I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn’t make up my mind which of the figs I would choose. I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.

 

The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath (2000)

 

Tattoo inspired by 'The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath'

Image via sylviaplathink.tumblr.com

 

3. “I desire the things which will destroy me in the end.”

 

Tattoo featuring famous quotations from 'The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath'

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4. “I talk to God but the sky is empty.”

 

Tattoo inspired by 'The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath'

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5. “I have the choice of being constantly active and happy or introspectively passive and sad. Or I can go mad by ricocheting in between.”

 

Sylvia Plath: The Collected Poems (1993)

 

Tattoo inspired by Sylvia Plath poem 'Lady Lazarus'

Image via sylviaplathink.tumblr.com

 

6. “Out of the ash / I rise with my red hair / And I eat men like air.” “Lady Lazarus” (1962)

 

Tattoo inspired by "Tulips" by Sylvia Plath

Image via sylviaplathink.tumblr.com

 

7. “I didn’t want any flowers, I only wanted / to lie with my hands turned up and be utterly empty.” “Tulips” (1961)

 

As what might have been her eighty-sixth birthday swiftly approaches (Oct. 27), it’s all the more important to remember Plath’s life and accomplishments.

 

 

 

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tattoo

12 Awesome Literary Tattoos

It’s tattoo day! Celebrate by checking out these incredible tattoos inspired by literature.

 


 

Slaughterhouse-Five

 

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The Little Prince

 

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Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy 

 

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The Lord of the Rings 

 

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The Lorax 

 

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The Wizard of Oz

 

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Where The Wild Things Are

 

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Harry Potter

 

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Peter Pan

 

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Chronicles of Narnia

 

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A Song of Ice and Fire

 

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Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

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Check Out These 9 Stunning J.R.R. Tolkien Inspired Tattoos

When it comes to fantasy books, we can all agree Tolkien’s works are some of the best. The love for this epic author and his wondrous, fantastical world of magic can still be seen and felt today. For example, musical artist Grimes recently got an amazing J.R.R. Tolkien tattoo and she took to Instagram to show it off.

 

 

j r r tokin ?

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Sick, right? Check out these other stunning pieces of art based off of Tolkien’s works! Middle-earth love is strong in these people.

 

Tattoo of the ring on forearm

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Aren’t they incredible? Do you have any tattoos inspired by your favorite books or authors?

 

 

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Books

12 Discreet Tattoos for the Devoted Bookworm

The only thing more frightening than a needle is a needle that’s full of permanent body ink. Tattoos aren’t for the fickle. That’s me. I still can’t make up my mind. Big or small, words or lyrics? I can’t even decide what to have for lunch.

 

Big tattoos are a huge commitment and now there seems to be more dainty and delicate tattoos on the rise. Something simple can go a long way, especially if your style and personality are more easygoing. Or perhaps you just want a small tattoo. Hey, that’s cool too. Here’s my list of discreet literary tattoos for the laid-back bookworm.
 

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Kurt Vonnegut

Why I Got Kurt Vonnegut Tattooed on My Arm

When I was twelve-years-old I read Slaughterhouse-Five for the first time. I was absolutely enthralled, I had never read anything like it. I didn’t know you could write like that. Conversationally, controversially, about real life and an infinite universe all in one. I’m not sure what made more of an impression on lil ol’ me: the voice or the real-world-but-slightly-suspicious atmosphere, but I was into it. Really into it.

 

So into it, that when I was twenty-years-old, Vonnegut’s signature and self portrait became a permanent part of me.

 

My Vonnegut tattoo

If I have a single regret about this tattoo, it’s that it’s impossible to photograph. 

 

The University of Houston’s creative writing program is small, competitive, and renowned. As such, you’ve gotta put together an impressive twenty page portfolio for your application. My submission, which five years later looks completely different, was the story of my first period and how Jack Nicholson bought me tampons and showed me how to use them. It’s based in fact, but I definitely took some creative liberty. One of my favorite professors later told me it was “the best submission he had read that semester”, but that’s neither here nor there.

 

That’s one of the lessons Kurt (that’s what I call him) taught me – write what you know, but make it intriguing. 

 

When I was younger I would lie to my mother just because it was more interesting than the truth. She indulged me because it was only ever the small stuff, never anything that really mattered. At thirteen, when I didn’t want to tell her who I was going to the movies with (Morgan, male, who, a decade and a cross-country move later, is still in my core group), I alleged my ongoing relationship with a forty-year-old, heavily-tattooed biker named Snake. Snake stuck around through high school where he helped me out with unsupervised parties and dates with boys my mother wouldn’t approve of. A few years ago, I overheard a gorgeous bearded and tattooed biker introduce himself as Snake. My long con finally got interesting. 

 

Alongside eavesdropping and people watching, one of my favorite hobbies is blatantly lying to people I will never meet again. I don’t consider it lying, though. It’s more an exercise in creativity. I like to see just how ridiculous and unbelievable the words coming out of my mouth can get before I’m called out on my bullshit. In 2012, I didn’t have time for a costume change after a spectacularly formal affair (my own debutante ball) and the entire bar was lead to believe I had just been left at the altar and collectively paid for me to black out on White Russians. To be fair, I was wearing a wedding dress so my tale was particularly convincing.

 

Kurt Vonnegut isn’t the only voice-driven author I unknowingly formed my own writer’s identity around: Chuck Palahniuk, Hunter S. Thompson, Charles Bukowski, and George Saunders are on that list. They all run in a similar circle. They’re open and honest and unapologetically themselves.

 

And whether or not I meant to, that’s what I became. I write like I talk, and I talk like I think, but I never learned how to think before I speak and I have a fundamental misunderstanding of the concept “too much information”. You could call me intense. I like to joke that I go full psycho from the beginning, that way no one can ever accuse me of not being myself. That’s something that stands true for all aspects of my life. I listen to my gut and follow my emotions and interests where they lead me, and they lead me to some pretty interesting places, thoughts, and people.

 

Life as we know it is incredibly beautiful, but it’s also miserable, and there’s no reason why that misery can’t also be beautiful. We’re alive for a blink of an eye, in the cosmic scale of things, so there’s no reason to avoid the often unavoidable misery (and beauty) of life. 

 

I got Kurt Vonnegut tattooed on my arm because of how I felt that first time I read Slaughterhouse-Five, or Cat’s Cradle, or Hocus Pocus. Because of that sense of wonder and excitement and inspiration. Because I finally opened my eyes and saw the world for what it is and what it could be, and I don’t think I’ve ever been happier. Because “the universe is a big place, perhaps the biggest,” and you can close your eyes and explore each and every crevice of it without ever getting up from your chair. I got Kurt Vonnegut tattooed on my arm because I wanted to carry that happiness around with me, and now I do.

 

My Vonnegut tattoo

Seriously, this is the clearest photo I have of it “in context”.

 

And as a bonus, here are ten of my favorite Vonnegut-isms, from me to you…

 

1. “Listen. All great literature is about what a bummer it is to be a human being.”

From “Cold Turkey,” In These Times, 2004.

 

2. “People need good lies. There are too many bad ones.”

From an interview with Wilfrid Sheed in LIFE, September 12, 1969, republished in Conversations with Kurt Vonnegut, 1988.

 

3. “We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.” 

From the introduction to Mother Night, 1961.

 

4. “Laughter and tears are both responses to frustration and exhaustion. I myself prefer to laugh, since there is less cleaning to do afterward.”

From Palm Sunday: An Autobiographical Collage, 1981.

 

5. “All persons, living and dead, are purely coincidental.” 

From the epigram of Timequake, 1997.

 

6. “Anything can make me stop and look and wonder, and sometimes learn.”

From Cat’s Cradle: A Novel, 1963.

 

7. “I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all the kinds of things you can’t see from the center.”

From Player Piano: A Novel, 1952.

 

8. “That is how you get to be a writer, incidentally: you feel somehow marginal, somehow slightly off-balance all the time.”

From Palm Sunday: An Autobiographical Collage, 1981.

 

9. “You can’t write novels without a touch of paranoia. I’m paranoid as an act of good citizenship, concerned about what the powerful people are up to.”

From an interview with Israel Shenker in The New York Times, March 21, 1969.

 

10. “Writers get a nice break in one way, at least: They can treat their mental illnesses every day.”

From an interview with Playboy, July 1973.

 

Featured image via Indy Star.