Tag: SylviaPlath

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15 Quotes About Writing from Famous Authors

Whether you’re an aspiring writer, an avid reader, or none of the above you can’t help but admit the power and influence the written word has on us all. Writing can be cathartic, informative, distracting, devastating, connecting, and everything in-between.

 

I love writing and words and all the ways in which they can effect our lives so much (seriously) that I’m at a complete and total loss for them right now. 

 

So, I’m just going to let these fifteen quotes from famous authors do the rest of the talking.

 

 

“If I waited for perfection…I would never write a word.” —Margaret Atwood

 

 


 

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.” —Maya Angelou

 


 

“I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I see and what it means. What I want and what I fear.” —Joan Didion

 


 

“Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.”—Virginia Woolf

 


 

“Who wants to become a writer? And why? Because it’s the answer to everything. … It’s the streaming reason for living. To note, to pin down, to build up, to create, to be astonished at nothing, to cherish the oddities, to let nothing go down the drain, to make something, to make a great flower out of life, even if it’s a cactus.” —Enid Bagnold

 

 


 

“We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.” —Anaïs Nin

 


 

“And by the way, everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.”  —Sylvia Plath

 


 

“When I’m writing I know I’m doing the thing I was born to do.” —Anne Sexton

 


 

“I am writing all this down in blue ink, so as to remember that all words, not just some, are written in water.” —Maggie Nelson

 


 

“In the diary you find proof that in situations which today would seem unbearable, you lived, looked around and wrote down observations, that this right hand moved then as it does today.” —Franz Kafka

 


 

“A person who writes a book willfully appears before the populace with his pants down.” —Edna St. Vincent Millay

 


 

“Read, read, read. Read everything — trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it. Then write. If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out of the window.” —William Faulkner

 


 

Who am I? I’m just a writer. I write things down. I walk through your dreams and invent the future. Sure, I sink the boat of love, but that comes later. And yes, I swallow glass, but that comes later.” —Richard Siken

 


 

“Not all poetry wants to be storytelling. And not all storytelling wants to be poetry. But great storytellers and great poets share something in common: They had something to say, and did.” —Sarah Kay

 


 

“The secret to being a writer is that you have to write. It’s not enough to think about writing or to study literature or plan a future life as an author. You really have to lock yourself away, alone, and get to work.” —Augusten Burroughs

 

 

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10 Quotes to Celebrate Sylvia Plath

The late, great poet and novelist Sylvia Plath has a special place in the hearts of readers across the globe. Her most well known work, The Bell Jar, has become a classic since being published in 1963. Today would have been Plath’s 80th birthday, and book lovers are celebrating her legacy. To join in on the fun, we’re sharing 10 of her most beloved quotes. 



 

“Out of the ash I rise with my red hair, and eat men like air.”

 

“There must be quite a few things that a hot bath won’t cure, but I don’t know many of them.”

 

 

“I have the choice of being constantly active and happy or introspectively passive and sad. Or I can go mad by ricocheting in between.”

 

“I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery—air, mountains, trees, people. I thought, ‘This is what it is to be happy.’”

 

“Remember, remember, this is now, and now, and now. Live it, feel it, cling to it. I want to become acutely aware of all I’ve taken for granted.”

 

 

“If they substituted the word ‘Lust’ for ‘Love’ in the popular songs it would come nearer the truth.”

 

“I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead; I lift my eyes and all is born again.” 

If you enjoyed these quotes but aren’t too familiar with Plath’s writing, there’s never been a better time to dive in and see what all the fuss is about. If you are a Plath-oholic, what are you doing to celebrate her birthday? We’d love to hear it.

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Ted Hughes Biographer Unearths New Details About Sylvia Plaths Final Days

Thanks to the work of biographer Sir Jonathan Bate, we now know more about a Ted Hughes poem uncovered in 2010. According to Bate, the poem was inspired by a fight between the poet and his wife, Sylvia Plath, on the same weekend that she took her own life.

Hughes’ relationship with Plath was famously troubled, and the poet was intensely private about their marriage and Plath’s eventual suicide. Hughes’ decision to destroy Plath’s final journal after her death is notorious, and the poet rarely addressed Plath’s suicide in any published poetry.

We gained a new poetic insight into Plath’s death when Melvyn Bragg and Hughes’ widow, Carol, discovered a new Hughes poem called “Last Letter” in the British library. The poem, which was unearthed in 2010, provided new details about Plath’s final weekend. At the time, the “last letter” discussed in the poem was assumed to be a suicide note or a note threatening suicide.

But Sir Jonathan Bate, provost of Worcester College, Oxford, has learned more about that note. With unprecedented access to Hughes’ papers on both sides of the Atlantic, the biographer has learned that the letter in question was actually a parting letter: Plath was planning to return to the United States and leave Hughes forever. Plath posted the letter with the idea that it would arrive a few days later, after she’d gone, but somehow it arrived that very afternoon. When confronted with the letter, Plath took it and burned it – these are the events detailed in the poem.

Bate’s new account also includes several other sad details about Plath’s final weekend, including the fact that Hughes was in bed with another lover at the time of Plath’s death.

 

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Stephen L., Staff Writer

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10 Essential Poems You Can Read Online

The Internet is a great resource for readers because it offers so much reading material for free. Just click on each title on this list to view the poem!

There are far more than ten great poems hanging around the Internet, of course, so we’ve tried to limit ourselves to the most essential and classic examples. Share your own favorites in the comments!

“Because I Could Not Stop For Death” by Emily Dickinson

“Because I Could Not Stop For Death” is grim, elegant, and rhythmic. It’s a perfect example of Dickinson’s style. The fact that this poem was published only after Dickinson died is, unfortunately, also typical of Dickinson. She published just eight of her poems during her lifetime, and only became famous after she passed away.

 

“Daddy” by Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath is one of the most iconic and tragic figures in the history of literature. Her poetry has a sort of desperate quality that gives it the same power as her famous novel The Bell Jar. In “Daddy,” the speaker inspects her relationship with her father, and everything that it connects to.

 

“Dinosauria, We” by Charles Bukowski


Bukowski’s wild free-form poems are alternately depressing and exciting. “Dinosauria, We” captures Bukowski’s grim outlook on life. In Bukowski’s apocalyptic view, we are “Born like this / Into this.”

 

“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” by Dylan Thomas


Dylan Thomas’ most famous poem is a masterpiece. The poem has inspired everything from songs and stories to works of art. It’s also perhaps the most famous example of a villanelle, a poetic form that requires 19 repeating lines.

 

“Harlem” by Langston Hughes


Hughes, a key figure in the Harlem renaissance, writes here about the neighborhood where it all happened. “What happens to a dream deferred?” Hughes asks. His poem’s suggested answers consider misery and, ultimately, spectacular hope.

 

“Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley


Shelley’s most famous sonnet reflects on the fleeting nature of power. The poet describes a ruined monument to Ozymandius (the Greek name for Pharaoh Ramesses II). “Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” the inscription reads, though there is nothing left to see.

 

“Song of Myself” by Walt Whitman


Whitman’s famous works often touch on the America of his time, including the brutal realities of life during the Civil War. “Song of Myself” is no exception, but it also includes deeply personal thoughts. “Song of Myself” was published in Whitman’s famous Leaves of Grass.

 

Sonnet 18 (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”) by William Shakespeare


Just about any of Shakespeare’s sonnets could hold their own on this list – after all, he did Shakespearian sonnets so well that he lent his name to the form. We’ve chosen one of his most famous. You can find all of Shakespeare’s sonnets online, so if you disagree with our selection, just link to your suggestion in the comments section!

 

“Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou

Angelou’s inspirational “Still I Rise” is a testament to overcoming history and discrimination. “Out of the huts of history’s shame / I rise,” Angelou writes, capturing both the degradation of slavery and the unconquered spirit of blacks in America. With race relations front and center in American culture once again, there’s no better time to read this poem.

 

“Who Goes With Fergus?” by William Butler Yeats

Ireland’s most famous poet is worthy of the year-long celebration that his nation is giving him this year. Here, he draws a figure from Irish mythology and gives him the poetic treatment. Yeats’ elevates the Irish source material by using it as inspiration, just as other poets used stories from Greek and Roman source in their own work.

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