Tag: streaming

‘Game of Thrones’ Finale Sets Ratings Record for HBO

Game of Thrones went out on a high mark, at least in terms of ratings. The finale episode drew in an audience of 19.3 million episode across HBO’s various platforms, according to BuzzFeed. The new record beat the previous episode, The Bells, which had already set a huge high mark with 18.4 million ratings. The impressive overnight ratings showed that television is still a huge and valid form of entertainment, drawing in millions of viewers if the show is big enough.

 

Sansa sitting on her new throne as Queen of the North

Image via Den of Geek

HBO’s previous record holder for most watched was the final episode of The Sopranos back in 2002, which drew in a then massive audience of 13.4 million. But Game of Thrones has blown that out of the water with nearly every episode this season. Each episode, accounting for streaming and rewatching, has drawn in an average audience of over 44 million viewers! Whoa! That’s massive! HBO must be sad to see the series reaching its conclusion considering the high amount of viewers the season has drawn in but thankfully for both them and fans, more Game of Thrones spinoffs are on the horizon. It remains to be seen in these spinoffs will draw in Game of Throne’s massive fanbase and hold a candle to their parent show but with the established huge audience for the show, anything is possible.

In any case, the final season is a huge milestone for HBO and indeed, TV in general! Congratulations to Game of Thrones!

 

 

Featured Image Via Game of Thrones Wiki 

Here’s Why China Is Delaying ‘Game of Thrones’ Finale

It seems Game of Thrones might be the latest to suffer as a result of the ongoing trade war. According to CNN, China’s video internet service which owns the rights to the show, shocked viewers when they delayed the release of the final episode due to “video transmission problems”. This was a huge blow to Chinese fans of the show, who vented their frustration and dismay over the episode’s sudden and unexpected delay online. Many fans suggested a possible connection between the ongoing trade war and the episode’s delay, and touting the possibility that streaming services were being targeted along with other products.

Several viewers responded to the delay by posting the infamous ‘shame’ GIF.

 

A nun-like figure walking through the streets ringing her bell and yelling 'Shame!'

Image Via Game of Thrones wiki

 

The timing is possibly parallel to the escalation of the trade war, with Donald Trump raising tariffs on Chinese goods, with China also raising its own tariffs on U.S. goods in turn. In addition, anti-US propaganda has escalated in China, leading to a lingering thread of hostility between the two countries. Chinese productions with US links, meanwhile, have been vanishing from various networks, getting cancellations without warning. Historical channels have also been airing propaganda films showcasing their countryman fending off American invaders. It’s possible Game of Thrones has become the latest victim of this due to intensifying relations.

What do you think of this situation? It’s a pity of all those Game of Thrones fans overseas who were deprived of the finale but it seems to be a symptom of a much larger problem.

 

 

Featured Image Via Deadline

Horror Noire Sheds Light on a Forgotten Genre of Film History

Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror has been making the rounds recently. Released as an exclusive on Shudder, the documentary explores the history of black people in the horror genre, from the ugly roots where black people were written as literal monsters by films such as Birth of a Nation to modern black horror film Get Out. The documentary has received critical acclaim for exploring a topic often swept under the rug or ignored entirely. But what’s lesser well known is that Horror Noire is based on a book. This book, Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890s to Present by Robin R. Means Coleman explores the same topic in its pages, providing an excellent companion piece to the documentary or vice versa.

 

Duane Jones plays Ben in Night of the Living Dead
Image Via Horror News Network

 

Coleman’s interest in the black horror genre began with seeing Night of the Living Dead on rotation at a drive in theatre. In that film, Ben is one of the first significant black protagonists represented onscreen in a non-stereotypical fashion. He takes charge of the situation and lasts beyond his white peers, until the end of the film. There, Ben is shot and disposed of by a group of men hunting down zombies. He’s cast aside with the other dead, his body burned as the credits roll over this image, a terrifying end to the film. This film made an impact on Coleman and began her scholarly research in horror.

 

The book cover of Horror Noire by Robin R. Means Coleman
Image Via Horror News Network

 

In the book, Coleman defines horror films through the lens of black representation through two lenses. “Blacks in Horror” include black actors in significant roles but their roles are stereotypical. ‘Black Horror’ meanwhile finds horror films shaped and created by black directors, writers, etc. to create thematic works that resonate with their audience. Examples of ‘Blacks in Horror’ include films such films where black people serve as the comic relief, the victim for the monster, or have black culture portrayed through a white audience’s eyes, often not well. ‘Black Horror’ includes films such as Blacula, Tales from the Hood, and Get Out. These distinctions are examined critically throughout the book with a wide variety of horror films featuring black people or made by a black audience are dissected in detail, with the lines between the genres often being blurred depending on the era.

Coleman defines each era of black horror by the decade, from the earliest silent films to the modern age, showcasing how black representation goes up and down via the decade. It is interesting to showcase how horror allowed black people representation and true power onscreen, despite being marginalized at the same time. Horror, as Coleman defines it, allows a sense of retribution and equalization that other films genres would not provide for a long time. In this sense, Blacula is defined in the book’s pages as a truly wall shattering piece of piece, dismissed by white audiences but embraced by a black audience, as a black vampire looms large onscreen.

 

The documentary based on Coleman's book, Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror
Image Via Indiewire

 

Horror Noire is a must read for fans of the documentary, as well as fans of horror and film history. Covering in-depth aspects of tons of ‘black horror’ films, from the mainstream to the cult to the exploitation, this book is heavily recommended and sheds new light on what has often been unfairly dismissed as a trash genre, showcasing how much horror has meant to generations of black audiences, in shades of good, bad, and the ugly.

 

 

Featured Image Via Horror News Network