Tag: steampunk

5 Fantasy Books Featuring Mystical Faeries

Faeries have always had a special place in fantasy literature, and I think we can all see why. Sometimes, these beings take on the form of a trickster that messes with mortals for sheer enjoyment. Other times, the faerie in question may be a guide or maternal figure who leads the protagonist down the right path, offering sage advice and comfort when necessary. There is also the recurring theme of making these beings into immortal love interests who fall head-over-heels for their human paramours.

Long story short: faeries take on various roles in literature. Their magic and their personalities make them an inexhaustible source of inspiration and entertainment.

So, to feed your interest in faeries, here are five books featuring faerie characters.

 

1. “The cruel prince

The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) by [Black, Holly]

image via amazon

Holly Black is well known for her stories that draw inspiration from the Realm of Faerie. She was one of the two writers for The Spiderwick Chronicles, and she also authored The Modern Faerie Tale series. Honestly, whenever I go looking for books with faeries, Holly Black is one of the first writers to appear–and it’s really no surprise as to why this is the case. The Cruel Prince is the first book in The Folk of Air Series. This book introduces Jude, who was seven years old when her parents were killed by the fey, and she and her sisters were captured and forced to live in the Court of Faerie. In order to gain an official role in the court, Jude embroils herself in the cutthroat politics that pit her against Prince Cardan, a faerie who despises humans. In order to save her sisters and the realm though, Jude must join a risky political alliance that might help her succeed in her goals, or it might just double back and destroy her.

2. “bones of faerie

image via amazon

Janni Lee Simner lays out a story that takes place in the aftermath of a war between humans and faeries. After this conflict ended, the faeries disappeared and humanity has heard nothing from them since. Bones of Faerie follows fifteen-year-old Liza, a young girl who has never seen magic, but she has lived in a world that was wounded because of it. She soon learns that she has the gift to see into both the past and the present, and through this gift, she realizes that she must flee her hometown and go into the land of faerie. And maybe, just maybe, she can figure out how to mend the land on her journey.

3. “A court of thorns and roses

A Court of Thorns and Roses by [Maas, Sarah J.]

image via amazon

I just… I just really like Sarah J. Maas’s work. Author of The Throne of Glass series and the recently published Crescent City, Maas is a writer who continues to pull me back with every new book that she releases. A Court of Thorns and Roses is no exception to this rule. This story follows Feyre, a human and the sole provider for her family. One day while hunting, Feyre kills a wolf that turns out to be a Fae in disguise. She invokes the rage of Tamlin, the Fae lord of the Spring court who demands her life in return for the one that she took. He takes her back with him to the Spring court, where she lives amongst the Fae and comes to learn about the curse that looms over the court. And when this curse finally takes effect, Feyre must be the one to venture under the mountain to save Tamlin and his subjects.

 

4. “The Faerie Ring

image via amazon

Kiki Hamilton’s first installation to her Faerie Ring series promises a fascinating set of books to follow. The Faerie Ring follows Tiki, a young pickpocket who lives in London with her fellow orphans. When she steals a ring from a particular individual though, her actions threaten to cause war to break out between the faeries and humanity once again. However, plenty of individuals also want the ring for their own end goals… and some of those people do, indeed, want to see war engulf Britain.

5. “Magic under glass

image via amazon

Jaclyn Dolarmore’s Magic Under Glass promises a charming and romantic tale for readers. Nimira is a music-hall performer who barely manages to scrape together a living. She is enlisted by the sorcerer Hollin Perry for a special act–Nimira will sing in accompaniment to an automaton playing piano. However, she discovers that the spirit of a faerie inhabits her automaton partner, and the two fall in love. While Nimira tries to break her beloved’s curse, they must also work to save the faerie realm from impending doom.

featured image via Abstract Wallpapers – Desktop Nexus

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5 YA Genres That Are Totally Dead

Young adult fiction is undeniably one of the most popular genres of all time. It was first categorized around the 1930s with Lauren Ingalls Wilder’s series Little House on the Prairie. Teachers and librarians were slow to accept books intended for younger readers, but young adult books today focus on issues in society with such a passion that even older adults love to read them.

YA subgenres have ebbed and flowed over the years, and the two ever-reigning subgenres seem to be fantasy and contemporary fiction. You can always find a unique new release of a fantasy novel or a self-aware contemporary love story. But what genres are so dead that publishers in 2019 will rarely publish them and why did young adults stop reading them?

 

 

1. Dystopian

Image result for the scorch trials city"

image via crosswalk.com

 

Ah, yes. Dystopian. Nostalgia for 2012, anyone? Maybe it was because everyone was talking about the Mayan calendar and the end of the world, but people were in a craze over dystopian society books like The Hunger Games and Divergent. Books about post-apocalyptic societies like The Maze Runner weren’t too far behind in the craze, either. Most dystopian subgenres are based on sci-fi and these particular subgenres started to oversaturate the sci-fi genre. Because of the immense popularity of books like The Hunger Games, every author wanted to replicate that fame and success. Understandably, readers got bored.

We became sick of tropes like “the chosen 16-year old who has a special ability that allows him or her to rebel and change dystopian society.” Readers began to pay attention to different genres and new authors, and the dystopian genre and its tropes slowly died out as YA readers found more relevant books. With the upcoming release of Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games prequel, The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakesit’ll be interesting to see how this dystopian writer tackles this so-called “dead” genre.

 

2. PARANORMAL / URBAN fantasy

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image via empireonline.com

 

When you think of paranormal YA, think vampires, werewolves, and zombies. So basically Twilight minus the zombies. For a while, the Twilight series was the reigning series for the paranormal subgenre. Teens were obsessed and buying t-shirts to show off their pride in Team Edward or Team Jacob. So what happened? Well, other authors tried to replicate the success of Twilight, and teens kept reading vampire and werewolf books until they wanted a taste of something different. Once the movies were released, Twilight stirred up even more controversy as readers began to release that Bella and Edward were an unhealthy relationship portrayal for young teens.

 

 

Still, it seems a bit disappointing that the whole vampire subgenre should die out because of one bad portrayal— especially when there’s so many amazing vampire stories, like Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire. But never fear for those readers who were into paranormal or urban fantasy books other than Twilight, or even those who were into Twilight (no shame here)— these subgenres are making a slow return, starting with Renee Ahdieh’s new vampire novel The Beautiful.

 

 

3. STEAMPUNK

image via the portalist

 

Steampunk is one of a few YA genres that has never taken hold of a readership. Any successful steampunk books are technically classified under other YA subgenres and only have small steampunk elements. Those books that did attempt to focus solely on steampunk, an attempt that surged around the early 2000s, were usually adult books and were just too similar to each other to claim a place as a real subgenre.

 

4. Superhero

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image via CBR.com

 

Superheroes certainly have a presence in comic books and movies, but this genre just isn’t present in YA. There’s no clear reason why superheroes are more popular in movies than books— maybe viewers would rather see sexy superhero actors and actresses blow stuff up rather than reading about them. Or maybe, like steampunk, superhero YA books have just been too similar with dead YA tropes like “the chosen one.”

 

5. TIME TRAVEL

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image via the next web

 

Time travel in YA sci-fi hasn’t been as successful as you might think, although time travel in YA fantasy has more of a presence. Maybe it’s because sci-fi books like H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine were written way back in 1895 and readers’ fascination with time travel has died out since then. Yet time travel is still popular in movies and TV, so it’s also up to speculation as to why this genre hasn’t taken off in YA.

If you’re interested in more about the book market or dead genres in publishing, check out this video by Alexa Donne, author of Brightly Burning. She explains all of these dead genres and tropes in-depth and also has some fascinating insights about the publishing world as well as advice for new writers.

 

 

 

Featured image via The Pilot Press