Tag: socialmedia

moonrise kingdom

15 Book-Themed Instagrams to Enrich Your Feed

You know that feeling you get in the pit of your stomach as you’re nearing the end of a really good book; that growing sense of excitement to see how it all unfolds, that thrill of feeling so deeply invested in a life other than your own, and that impending, dark-cloud feeling of “oh no, what will I do after?” knowing that your time with these characters is drawing to an end?

 

I think we grow so close to the characters in the books we read because it’s the only time we are truly invited to enter the world of someone other than ourselves; we see their inner monologue, their every word, thought, and emotion, everything they want to say but choose to keep inside. Books allow us to see people in all of their full, vulnerable humanness. And, when it’s time to say goodbye to the strangers we now know as well as we know ourselves, a sort of mourning begins to take place. It can be tough to leave the worlds we spend so much time in; fiction and all.

 

However, thanks to social media, the goodbye doesn’t have to be complete; now you can scroll through the photos of your favorite book worlds to your heart’s content! 

 

Check out these fifteen Instagram accounts dedicated to your favorite books and authors!

 

1. A Little Life @alittlelifebook

 

 

#bookfacefriday by @dyahayuni #alittlelifebook

A post shared by A Little Life: A Novel (@alittlelifebook) on

 

 

2. Pride & Prejudice @pandp2005

 

 

 

3. Harry Potter @thepottercollector

 

 

 

4. Stephen King @jobis89

 

 

I have an important task for you all……. please help me choose my next audiobook! ? . The 12 books pictured are the 12 possible contenders! They’re books I read back near the beginning of my King journey, and are the ones that I feel open to revisiting right now (in that my memory is patchy ?) . So if you want, pick TWO books from those pictured and I’ll do a quick tally tomorrow before I embark on my run. I’ll be able to download and start listening to the most popular choice right away ?? . Choose wisely, Constant Readers. And God have mercy on the evil people who choose The Stand… 47 hours long!!! ? . . . . . . . . #stephenking #audiobook #audible #bookcollage #bookcover #hardback #firstedition #readersareleaders #bibliophile #bookstagram #reading #igreads #bookworm #booknerd #booklover #booklove #lovebooks #bookish #bookaddict #read #fiction

A post shared by Johann ? Stephen King Nerd ? (@jobis89) on

 

 

5. Sylvia Plath @sylviaplathpoetry

 

 

(cr. @her_love_for_words ♡)

A post shared by Sylvia Plath (@sylviaplathpoetry) on

 

 

6. Agatha Christie @officialagathachristie

 

 

 

7. Paulo Coelho @paulocoelhoquote

 

 

 

8. Virginia Woolf @virginiawoolfblog

 

 

Virginia Woolf sitting on a beach in Greece in 1932. #virginiawoolf

A post shared by Virginia Woolf Blog (@virginiawoolfblog) on

 

 

9. Jane Austen @janeofausten

 

 

…with your favourite Janeite teapot #jane #janeausten #janeausten #janeite #tea #teatime

A post shared by Jane Austen (@janeofausten) on

 

 

10. Edgar Allan Poe @edgar.allan.poe

 

 

Q: Why did Poe write such dark stories? • A: Poe wrote for magazines which demanded stories that would appeal to a mass audience, so he gave them what they wanted. In fact, he only wrote about fifteen horror stories out of a total of seventy tales. Poe actually produced far more comedies than terror tales. He also wrote science fiction, mysteries, adventure stories, scientific essays, and a book about seashells. Today’s readers tend to prefer his horror stories, but in Poe’s time, his audience liked the mysteries better. He last book of short stories, Tales of Edgar A. Poe (1845), only contained one horror story among a collection of mysteries and science fiction. Although he suffered bouts of depression after his wife’s death, Poe wasn’t a terribly morbid or melancholy person. • Mary Bronson, who, as a young girl, visited Poe with her father, later recalled, “We saw Mr. Poe walking in his yard, and most agreeably was I surprised to see a very handsome and elegant appearing gentleman, who welcomed us with a quiet, cordial, and graceful politeness that ill accorded with my imaginary sombre poet. I dare say I looked the surprise I felt, for I saw an amused look on his face as I raised my eyes a second time…” (LeDuc, Mary Elizabeth Bronson, “Recollections of Edgar A. Poe,” Home Journal, whole no. 754, July 21, 1860, p. 3) • #EdgarAllanPoe Photo by: @rebecca_ellix

A post shared by Edgar Allan Poe (@edgar.allan.poe) on

 

 

11. The Brontë Sisters @bronteforever

 

 

The Great American Read on PBS has started and they are featuring 100 of the most beloved books, and choosing one final winner. Please vote for the top one! Please go to @greatamericanreadpbs and click on the link in their bio to vote for either Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. I’m so glad both Bronte sisters were featured on this list of world renown novels. __________________________________________ #bronte #brontes #thebrontes #brontesisters #bronteforever #emilybronte #charlottebronte #annebronte #bookaddicts #epicreads #janeeyre #mustread #bookworm #booknerd #books #booklover #bookstagram #bookish #literature #instabook #igread #wutheringheights #victorian #classicnovels #brontësisters #greatreadpbs #readinggoals #votejaneeyre

A post shared by ??The Bronte Sisters ? (@bronteforever) on

 

 

12. Charles Dickens @dickensmuseum

 

 

 

13. Alice in Wonderland @alice_in_wonderland_books

 

 

 

14. Haruki Murakami @harukimurakamiquotes

 

 

 

15. Infinite Jest @drawinginfinitejest

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Twitter

 

Cat yawn

‘Cat Person’ Author Speaks out About Real-Life Inspiration for the Viral Short Story

This past December, a 4,000-word short story took the internet by storm when it was published in The New Yorker. The story is titled Cat Person, and details the trials of twenty-year-old college student Margot as she meets and briefly dates thirty-four-year-old Robert.

 

The all-too-realistic piece of fiction showcases Margot throughout the many quick-changing stages of a blooming, new relationship: the excitement, the giddiness, the butterflies of a growing new crush, the fantasies about everything this relationship could possibly grow into, all the way through unto the grounding realization that this person is not at all who you’d hoped they were.

 

*** SPOILERS AHEAD***

 

The rose colored glasses always begin to fade, and, when they do, Margot realizes Robert is not someone she wants to see. And, by the time everything’s progressed to their first (and only) sexual encounter, Margot’s already realized that she’s not at all attracted to this stranger of a man. She feels repulsion towards him, but doesn’t know how to stop, seeing as sex has already been initiated and they are well in the midst of it all. Margot allows her mind to drift off so she can “just get it over with” while Robert does what he wants until he’s finished:

 

…she felt like a doll again, as she had outside the 7-Eleven, though not a precious one now—a doll made of rubber, flexible and resilient, a prop for the movie that was playing in his head.

 

She ends their relationship shortly after, telling Robert she’s not interested and asking him to stop texting her. The story ends months down the line when Robert gets drunk at Margot’s go-to bar, then spends the remainder of night verbally harassing her via text messages, starting with:

 

“Hi Margot, I saw you out at the bar tonight. I know you said not to text you but I just wanted to say you looked really pretty. I hope you’re doing well!”

“I know I shouldnt say this but I really miss you”

 

And quickly escalating to and ending with:

 

“Answer me”

“Whore.”

 

This story spoke to millions of women of all ages who couldn’t help but see themselves in Margot. The societal expectations placed upon women and girls to always be appeasing, to never come across as difficult, and to never anger or upset the man you are in bed with are an unmanageable weight to bear. This story spread to such immense popularity because it worked to shine a light on the ways in which we are taught that consent always looks like x, y, or z. And that, if you agreed to the encounter initially, there’s no backing out; we are taught to believe that you cannot revoke your yes.

 

I don’t think I, personally, know any women (myself, included) who haven’t been in this exact situation multiple times over the years. Nights that end this way always feel like they’re surrounded by this foggy cloud of discomfort, fear, disappointment, dissociation, and disgust (both with them and with yourself). It’s scary to be alone with someone you don’t know very well, and feel just completely stuck inside their house with no real way out. You never want to be rude by asking to leave, and you also don’t want to anger them for fear of how they might react.

 

It’s the sort of situation where your heart races and your palms sweat and you feel yourself quickly weighing out all of your options until you, eventually, decide that, well, it’s already pretty late and, if you just stick it out until morning, you can go home and shower and pretend it never happened. This way, you avoid any awkward or scary confrontations, and ensure they’re feelings remain unhurt while you just mime your way through the rest of the evening; letting your thoughts wander somewhere else, to some far-off place until it’s all, finally, over. (It doesn’t even have to be a stranger from some Tinder date; we can all-too-often find ourselves ignoring uncomfortable or coercive behavior from people we are already in committed relationships with, allowing them to do what they want under the guise of being in love and being too afraid to rock the boat.)

 

This situation is such a commonality within the dating-sphere, it’s no surprise that author Kristen Roupenian drew from her own personal, real-life experiences to create this story. Roupenian spoke to The Times earlier this week, opening up about her own Cat Person for the very first time.

 

It all started when Roupenian, who had spent many years in a long-term committed relationship, found herself single at thirty-five for the first time since she was in her twenties:

 

When I was 26 and dating, I was such a mess and everything was terrible. I thought now I would be a mature adult and wouldn’t screw up and would understand when people are garbage right away. But instead I felt just as smacked by it and just as confused…I went on a date, it went poorly, and we got in a fight. And that’s alright, but I thought, ‘I’m 35, how did I make this mistake? How did I misread someone so completely?

 

The story grew to success seemingly overnight, and resulted in Roupenian landing a two-book deal with Scout Press, including a collection of short-stories set to release in 2019 and a currently untitled novel.

 

The success was by no accident, however. The story resonated, and still resonates, with people across the board.

 

Dating is never as easy as any of us hope it’s going to be. And, it can be difficult when you’re meeting all of these people to not feel tired of it all, and just ready to settle down with the next semi-charming, borderline-compatible adult human you stumble across. But, once you’ve already begun to force a connection with someone and convince yourself of it’s sustainability, it can be nearly impossible to come to terms with how you genuinely feel, walk out, and leave the situation behind you.

 

Roupenian went on to tell the Times about her own views surrounding the dating culture our society has built:

 

I think that young women in particular feel they have to manage and control and soothe and charm and weave this magic around men…The truth is, most people are not the right person for you, and the person who is the right person for you will still not be a perfect human being.

 

Since the Cat Person publication, Roupenian has learned she was never really alone in this thinking. Women all over have shared their own stories of uncomfortable dates that have ended in aggression, shame, and coercion.

 

I only hope that, now that a light has been shone on the aspects of dating and consent that before we had only ever been told to deal with and ignore, we can finally begin to see a shift in what we do and do not consider normal, healthy, and okay. 

 

In the meantime, we can continue sharing our stories. We can acknowledge and find comfort in the autonomy of our own bodies, and the fact that no one, no matter what their previous relationship to us may be, is allowed to steal that from us. We can refuse to accept the things that feel uncomfortable, scary, or harmful, and not feel any embarrassment, guilt, or shame in vocalizing that. We can understand and accept our own imperfect humanness, and work on erasing both our desire to mold and shift others’ views of us and our impossible desire to never disappoint.

 

We can keep standing up and speaking out. 

 

 

 

Featured Image via Sykesville Veterinary Clinic

Stack of nice books high resolution quality nice pretty

Meet the Stars of Bookstagram, Who Bring the Glam to Reading Life

It’s no secret that bibliophiles are often creative, artistic, and innovative people: after all, they’ve learned the power of building new, beautiful worlds in every book they’ve read. That’s why Bookstagram, a community within Instagram designed entirely for bookworms like yourself, is the perfect platform to share bookish wisdom and whimsy in creative ways. 

 

At its most basic, #bookstagram is used as a hashtag for book-related images on Instagram, from your latest beach read to the facade of a bookstore you’re dying to visit. But if you’re dying to show the world exactly how much you love reading, you can create an entire “bookstagram” yourself. There are no strings attached here—all you have to do is start a new Instagram account, then start posting all the literary photos your little heart desires.

 

Meet some awesome Bookstagrammers!

 

1. @hotcocoareads

 

 

“A bookshelf is as particular to its owner as are his or her clothes; a personality is stamped on a library just as a shoe is shaped by the foot.” —Alan Bennett . . I finally finished my January bookshelf project! I moved out all my non-fiction and middle-grade books to other rooms in my house so that I could have this area dedicated to classics. There is one small section of Young Adult books in the corner, but it’s fine for now. I’ve also left lots of space on most shelves for growth, and we’ll see how things are looking again next January, when I usually want to reorganize my books again. When is the last time you reorganized your bookshelves? Do you do it very often? Do you enjoy it—because I really do! I love holding my books in my hands again, leafing through them, smelling their pages and dusting them off! ? ? ? . . #bookshelves #shelfiesunday #shelfie #bookshelfie #homelibrary #bookcollection #bookcollecting #collectingbooks #booksbooksandmorebooks #bookseverywhere #booksbooksbooks #readingspot #booknook #readingspace #writingspace #readersofig #ilovebooks #amreading #readmore #homeoffice #surroundedbybooks #bookdecor #janinbooks18 #bookproject

A post shared by Jeana ?☕️? (@hotcocoareads) on

 

Jeana has been posting her literary adventures since 2015. With beautifully framed photos of her current reads and stacks of classics, she uses props like flowers and cozy essentials to decorate her content.

 

2. @thxboywthebooks

 

 

Maxi is an Argentinian vlogger who maintains a consistent cool-toned aesthetic on his account. Alternating between stacks, single book highlights, and spreads, he offers seriously addictive visuals of his favorite reads.

 

3. @reverieandink

 

 

Brittney is a book blogger who launched her Bookstagram account back in 2016. Her photos are jam-packed with rustic themed shots of her favorite fantasy and YA reads, each ornamented with cozy additions like her super adorable cat, Wes.

 

And don’t forget to get creative with your own Bookstagram! There are tons of ways to make a splash with your Bookstagram account. You can opt for simply posting swoon-worthy shots of your bookshelves (A.K.A. literary eye-candy) or you can get involved with reading challenges. You can find these on some big-name Bookstagram profiles if you’re willing to sift through your favorite accounts, but @thereadingwomen and @strumpetstea both have active challenges going on right now if you wanna get a headstart!

 

Don’t be afraid to reach out to authors and other Bookstagrammers: comment on their posts, ask questions, invite conversation. It often helps to pick a theme for your content and stick to it. Decide if you’re going to maintain a specific aesthetic (colorful, rustic, black and white, etc) then challenge yourself to deck out your account that way.

 

Sure, Bookstagram is chock-full of mesmerizing bookish photos to make you run to the nearest bookstore, but that’s not the only magic it has. The most beautiful part about Bookstagram is the sense of unity it fosters. An entire community of bibliophiles desperate to share their favorite reads with the world, Bookstagram allows an avenue for connection and comfort with like-minded bookworms all around the world. Don’t know what to read next? Need a bibliobuddy to fangirl with? Just head to Instagram and start swooning over words with bloggers who just might become your new best friends.

 

Feature Image by Aliis Sinisalu Via Unsplash

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Six Authors to Follow on Twitter

It seems like everyone is on Twitter these days, and our favorite authors are no exception. Take a break from arguing about that dress for a moment and follow some of these writers! Here are the authors that we find (for better or for worse) the most entertaining on Twitter.

Sherman Alexie

Sherman Alexie is very good at Twitter. The famous Native American writer tweets a mix of pointed political criticism and funny posts like this:

Yes it would, Sherman Alexie.

Paulo Coelho

We’ve professed our love for Paulo Coelho’s Twitter philosophizing before, and we stand by every word. Following Coelho on Twitter is like consulting a mountaintop yogi, only without having to climb the mountain.

Tao Lin

No comment.

Bret Easton Ellis

To be honest, Bret Easton Ellis isn’t that good at Twitter. He’ll fill your feed with his thoughts on random television shows and movies that he’s watching, and you’ll probably disagree with him a lot. Every once in a while, though, he’ll go on a rant that would do your grandpa proud.

It’s actually kind of refreshing to see an author using Twitter like it’s an AOL email address.

Joyce Carol Oates

Oates tweets her fair share of political stuff (and I don’t think she’d get along with Bret Easton Ellis), but she’s at her best when she’s tweeting strange thoughts that read like zen koans.

Serious question: is this a tweet about human-sized cats? Because I think it’s a tweet about human-sized cats.

J.K. Rowling

More than anyone else on this list, J.K. Rowling uses Twitter to interact with her readers.

Many of Rowling’s tweets specifically address questions from fans, which makes following her on Twitter kind of like listening to an ongoing interview. Tweet a question at J.K. Rowling, and let us know if you get a response!

Did we miss anyone? Let us know in the comment section!