Tag: Shakespeare

Seven Words Shakespeare Invented

Did you know Shakespeare invented more than 1700 words? Probably. Maybe. There’s a bunch of controversy. Still, he definitely invented some words we use every day. You can probably find the long list if you really want, but here are seven. You may sense a theme.

 

 

1. Countless

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This is a pretty pedestrian word. Obviously Shakespeare didn’t invent the idea of counting, but he did give us a useful way to talk about it. It’s definitely faster than saying ‘without measure’.

 

2. Gloomy

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What would we do without the word gloomy? No synonym comes close. Dark? Shadowy? Get out of here. In this, the gloomiest season, it’s only right we honor the word itself.

 

 

3. Critic

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Where would we be without critics? How would we know what super hero movies are actually worth the trouble? In 2019, it’s hard, and I say that as a fan.

 

 

4. Bloody

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Another one that’s hella seasonably appropriate. Another one where there are no good synonyms, though I feel like if you want to convey it there are some fun gothic options.

 

 

5. Pious

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This one’s got ‘devout’ but pious does have a different vibe, maybe more smugness? Whatever it is, you can never have too many synonyms. Words, words, words.

 

 

6. Lonely

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Whatever would we do without lonely? Loneliness, lonesome, just a lot of feeling in a small space. Shakespeare knew what was up, though it doesn’t seem like HE was ever alone.

 

 

7. Majestic

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Majestic is a great word, for both serious and ironic usage (a lot of the images I found were derpy lions and unlikely centaurs). It conveys something ‘great’ just doesn’t.

 

 

 

Featured image via ThoughtCo

Eight Spicy Hamlet Memes

Alright, so you know we’re obsessed with SparkNotes’ twitter. Or, I am at least.  The memes are so dank. And now there’s a master list of everything they’ve posted about Hamlet, or at least a lot of it, and it’s all iconic. Here we go.

 

When Your Dad Tells You to Do Something

 

Clean my room? Murder your killer? Totally, I’ll do that right now. Just let me finish this chapter. Level. Book. I’ll TOTALLY remember the stabbing stuff after that. I’ll even clean up the blood. When I get to it. No one’s perfect, you know?

 

 

When You’re Totally Not Jealous

 

Hamlet might have been the first emo. Maybe. Certainly he was pretty early. Like, I get it man, intellectual and philosophical despair or whatever, your stepdad SUCKS, but maybe go outside. Get some sun. Maybe some soft serve. Commit a murder. Whatever works?

 

 

The Roulette Wheel of Murder Excuses

 

No, I totally didn’t kill my brother, it was, um… *turns around and furiously spins visible wheel* … a snake! Yeah. It was a snake. You know how it is. So many venomous snakes here in Denmark, it was bound to happen sometime. Totally innocent.

 

 

Ignoring the Obvious

 

Look. Your father died in a mysterious snake accident. Your uncle MARRIED YOUR MOM. That’s a yikes in any context, but it’s a super yikes here. Go and get all philosophical about it if you must, but Claudius is barely even trying to hide his misdeeds. Get to the decision, man.

 

 

Did You Ever Feel Like a Vine Could See You?

 

Look, Claudius, if you’re going to pull off a murderous coup, you’ve gotta have just like, a little tiny bit of chill. I’m not asking for a lot. This is like a vampire freaking out and running from the room every time you mention the sun. If you’re going to murder your brother, at least own it.

 

 

When the Paper is Due Tomorrow

 

Maybe just do to him whatever you did to Ophelia. Too soon? #opheliadeservedbetter Seriously though, you live with the guy. Literally just stand there and kill him when he STOPS praying. Kill him in his sleep. Do something. Honestly, Lettie, kill or do not kill, there is no try.

 

 

Absolutely No One

 

Formally. Informally. Hamlet had the emotions of a Romantic, about a hundred years too early. I feel like the romantics would have really Gotten him. (Or like, four hundred years before his time. Imagine Hamlet with a floppy fringe. I digress). Either way, he’s an emotional mess, but mostly valid. #opheliadeseRVEDBETTER

 

 

All images via Spark Notes

 

Quiz – Which Midsummer Night’s Dream Character Are You?

 

 

Featured image via NY Daily News 

3 Shockingly Fitting Literary References in ‘Riverdale’

Cringey writing is nothing new for the wildly popular CW teen drama, Riverdale, and viewers cannot help but love to hate it. Writers love to script completely otherworldly lines for Riverdale‘s sixteen-year-old characters that are packed with obscure references and SAT-level vocabulary words. In the same way, many of the characters retain a surprising amount of knowledge of famous literary works, because what high schooler doesn’t quote Jane Eyre on the daily?

Abundant literary references make a lot more sense considering individual episodes of Riverdale are categorized as “chapters,” usually followed by a famous literary title. Also, the entire series is narrated by Jughead who is apparently working on a novel about the town and its secrets. Here are some of our favorite highlights from Riverdale‘s literary reel.

cole sprouse kiss GIF

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  1. “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

A very important moment for Bughead (Betty + Jughead) shippers, this scene takes place in the sixth episode of Season 1 when the two characters kiss for the first time and the ship is born. In very literary fashion, Jughead uses a ladder to climb through Betty’s window to reach her while she is grounded. The scene makes two clever literary references. When Jughead reaches Betty’s window, he affectionately calls her “Juliet,” an easy nod to Romeo and Juliet.

Later, when referring to Betty’s house arrest, Jughead asks if Betty “has gone all Yellow Wallpaper on [him],” referencing the short story’s main character who, after being trapped in a room, begins succumbing to a debilitating mental illness that causes her to hallucinate and climb the walls. The scene is a sweet one for fans of the literary and actual couple alike — Bughead, and its real-life counterpart, Sprousehart, both came out of the series and stole our hearts.

camila mendes seriously GIF

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2. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

Capote’s journalistic novel following the murder of an innocent family seems obvious when considering the sinister subplot of the show’s first season; the foreshadowing reference occurs during the pilot of the show. Our resident posh chick Ronnie comments about the nature of the town as soon she steps out of her ride from New York. She proclaims herself to be much more Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the bright, city-centric novella by the same author about a dazzling female neighbor, while the town of Riverdale is much more In Cold Blood. She’s not wrong, but she sure is pretentious.

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3. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

The writers borrow this title of Conrad’s 1899 novel about English colonialism for the show’s fifth episode. This episode features Jason’s long-awaited funeral. Following the novel’s theme of people going where they don’t belong, Betty and Jughead sneak away during the event to lurk around the Blossom household searching for clues about Jason’s death. Here, they run into Cheryl’s grandmother who utters a famous phrase from the novel, “The horror, the horror!”

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