Tag: Shakespeare

Six Galaxy Brain Tweets from SparkNotes

If you’re anything like me, SparkNotes has always been there when you need it. Now, they’re not only helping you pass your classes, but also serving you the spiciest of literature memes. They’re all pure gold, but here are just a few.

 

 

Theseus or not, YOU. ARE. VALID.

 

 

Unfortunately there’s no third option, so if you want to set the Minotaur up on a blind date with your friend, you’re kind of out of luck. Otherwise, you’re good though. What color do your sails need to be if you didn’t slay the Minotaur but you’re seeing it this Friday?

 

 

 

Some people appreciate attitude

 

 

I mean, he’s already in love with her by that point, but you get the idea. He’s always talking about how mean she is, and then boom, marry me! Of course, the same could be said of her. What a stressful ship. Still though, you know, I’m on it.

 

 

 

Want to delay your problems forever?

 

 

Curiosity may not have killed the cat, but it sure killed Dorian Gray. Still, he lived a while looking fresh and evil in stead of old and evil, so if you’ve got the attic space, why not? In this economy though? The thing’s going under the bed.

 

 

 

Do You haunt an old building? Then you need…

 

 

 

Sure, you might not be the most conventionally attractive, but your secret underground hideaway is second to none, and isn’t it what’s on the inside that matters? What’s under the surface? (What’s directly  under the opera house?)

 

 

 

People can’t know we sit! And… murder!

 

 

Maybe not as relatable as the original video, but definitely a strong mood, and just as futile. The body stays right under the floorboards after all. If only there’d been seashells on the doorknobs, maybe things would have gone better.

 

 

 

Hindsight is… Ah man I botched it.

 

 

Don’t look back in anger (or at all). Going to the depths of hell is a nice gesture, and who doesn’t like musicians, but you’ve gotta stick the landing by actually fulfilling the deal. Just one opinion, but if both of you don’t come back alive, that’s a bad date.

 

 

 

All images via SparkNotes

7 Contemporary Adaptations of Classic Novels

Everyone likes an adaptation, and sometimes the best adaptations are underground. Here are seven picks from YouTube, perfect for marathoning, all based on classic novels and set in the modern era. No matter whether you’re a fan of Jane Austin, William Shakespeare, or Charlotte Bronte, there’s something for every classic book lover. Watch away!

 

1. Nothing Much To Do

 

Image via YouTube

 

If you like Much Ado About Nothing, get ready for Nothing Much to Do, an adaptation from New Zealand in vlog format, this time set at Messina High. All the accusations, the threats, and a few serenades on ukulele, this modern adaptation has all the humor and hatred you love, while also featuring a plastic flamingo. A must watch.

Based on Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare

 

 

2. Autobiography of Jane Eyre 

 

Image via Miss Daydreamer’s Place

 

Fans of Jane Eyre will appreciate the tragedy and measured pace of Autobiography of Jane Eyre. Filmed as a video diary, this series follows nursing student Jane as she leaves school, becomes a governess, and falls for the master of the house. Covering all the original beats of the story with inventiveness and heart, it has all the Gothic appeal of the original. Plus Adele is cute.

Based on Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

 

3. The Lizzie Bennet Diaries 

 

Image via The Hollywood Reporter

A classic, and for good reason. Thorough plotting, well paced character development, and silly costumes make this series compulsively watchable. Elizabeth is very much herself, lovable, judgmental, caringJane is sweet and decisive, Kitty is an actual cat, and Lydia is gleeful and wild. Set in California, Lizzie is a grad student with no interest in marriagemuch to her mother’s chagrin.

Based on Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austin

 

 

4. In Earnest

 

Image via Pinterest

Seriously, this web series is good. I’m not joking. You might say I’m Earnest, but honestly, who isn’t? Oscar Wilde’s classic is reimagined probably exactly as he would have wanted itwith everyone confused and overdressed. At just fifty episodes, it’s an excellent binge watch, and relatable, at least if you’ve ever wondered how to propose to someone you’ve given a false name.

Based on The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

 

5. Emma Approved

 

Image via Hollywood.com

In this adaptation, Emma runs a PR firm with her brother-in-law, George Knightly. Some great parties, some terrible decisions, and outrageous confidence make this a fun and lighthearted series, despite any low moments. Fans of Austin will be thrilled, and if you’re not yet obsessed, you will be.

Based on Emma by Jane Austin

 

 

6. Anne With An E 

 

Image via Kickstarter

If you can’t wait to return to Green Gablesor visit for the first timeGreen Gables Fables is a delightful and heartwarming take on the classic story. Never discouraged, Anne’s passion and creativity make this series sing, and even at one-hundred-fifty episodes (the longest on this list), it seems too short.

Based on Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

 

7. Jules and Monty

 

Image via YouTube

This adaptation of Shakespeare’s classic tragedy may have slightly less murder, but it has just as much tragedy as the original. The clash between two warring fraternities reaches new heights. Even with a lower mortality rate, this is still a tear jerker, so be warned. It’s also the shortest series on this list, with only twenty-one episodes.

Based on Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

 

 

Featured image via NegativeSpace

Boris Johnson’s Shakespeare Book Releasing Four Years Late

For those of you who don’t keep up with British politics, Boris Johnson is one of the key figures within the Brexit movement. The process of the UK withdrawing from the European Union has been a messy one to put it lightly. Apparently, it’s gotten so messy that Johnson is unable to finish his upcoming Shakespeare book.

Johnson was set to write and release a book titled Shakespeare: The Riddle of Genius. According to publisher Hodder & Stoughton, the book will offer an in-depth look at Shakespeare’s work.

 

“Boris Johnson explains Shakespeare’s genius in a simple and readable way; in a way that gets to grips with what is really going on, what the characters are up to, what the point of it all is; and in a way that sets the man simply and intelligibly in the context of his time.”

 

Originally set for release in 2016, the publisher had to delay the book indefinitely once Johnson got involved in all of the Brexit nonsense. Rumors circulated that Johnson hadn’t written a single word. But today, the publisher confirmed that the book will be released in 2020.

Even with the new release date, the book is still creating headaches for Johnson. According to Daily Mail UK, Johnson needs to pay back his $500,000 advance for the book due to the lengthy delay.

Would you read Johnson’s book?

 

 

Featured Image Via Sky News

'Mean Girls' characters dressed in Shakespearean style

Get Ready for New Shakespearean ‘Mean Girls’ Book

You might be familiar with Pride and Prejudice and Zombies—hopefully more as a book than as individual concepts. Pride is okay in small doses, and, while prejudice might be more common than zombies, neither is particularly pleasant. What is drastically more pleasant is the upcoming release of William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Mean Girls, a fun depiction the North Shore you remember but in iambic pentameter. It’s not like a regular book. It’s a cool book*.

Mean Girls has always been a cult classic. Now it’s well on its way to becoming a cult(ure) classic: after premiering in Washington, D.C. back in Fall 2017, Mean Girls made its broadway debut on April 8th, 2018. Since then, this hilarious tale of adolescence has come to esteemed venues in Philadelphia and Boston. Soon, it’ll be coming to a bookshelf near you.

 

"To buy or not to buy?"

That is the question!
Image Via The Daily Dot. Edited with befunky.

 

Playwright Ian Doescher will adapt the film into Shakespearean language, drawing upon his experience writing Elizabethan adaptations of various Star Wars plots. Obviously, there’s one major problem with this choice of author: he isn’t Tina Fey. Since he’s been open about his sensitivity towards writing a woman-centric story, we’ll try not to hold that against him. To portray the female cast with as much nuance as possible, he’s incorporated elements of female Shakespeare characters into their design. He opened up about who’s who in Philadelphia Magazine:

Cady Heron is Miranda in the Tempest where she’s talking this brave new world and she’s an innocent in the ways of the world. Janis Ian is Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing — she’s sharp tongued and fiercely loyal.

Usually, when it comes to adaptations, we ask ourselves whether or not the movie will be like the book—in this case, we have to wonder whether the book will be like the movie. Aside from the iambic pentameter, yes. Doescher has clarified that the only major changes he’s made to the plot were incorporated solely “for the play’s staging.” Does this vaguely allude to how Doescher will arrange the ‘hit by a bus’ scene? There’s really only one way to find out.

How much money would I spend to get this now instead of April 23, its release date? The limit does not exist.

 

*Note that we at Bookstr, on principle, think that all books are cool.

 

Featured Image Via Bustle.

‘The Big Sick’s’ Kumail Nanjiani to Star in Simon Rich’s ‘Any Person, Living or Dead’

Kumail Nanjiani, star of The Big Sick has been announced to star in an adaptation of Simon Rich’s short story “Any Person, Living Or Dead”according to The Hollywood Reporter.  Legendary Entertainment will be adapting the project, with Simon Rich himself writing the screenplay and Jonathan Krisel, whose previous projects include Portlandia.  The story was recently published in Rich’s collection of short stories titled Hits and Misses.

 

Image Via Moviefone 

The short story tells the tale of a man seeking to cure all of humanity’s problems, so he uses a time machine to travel through the centuries to collect brilliant minds to put their heads together to do so, such as Shakespeare, George Washington, and Aristotle. Unfortunately, the man underestimates the different values the men actually held, such as loose attitudes toward racism and violence, make them flawed and he has to stop them from damaging the future.

This looks like a fascinating story to adapt and we can’t wait to see Nanjiani again on the big screen!

 

 

Featured Image Via Deadline