Tag: sex

Founder of Sex Club, Snctm, to Tell All in New Book

Ever wonder what it’s like to attend a swanky NYC erotic club that charges a $75,000 membership fee? I know I have. I also know that us ninety-nine-percenters will never have access to that strange, glitzy world—but we will have a tell-all book in the near future.

 

Snctm
Featured Image via Wochit News

 

Damon Lawner, the founder of New York’s most exclusive sex club, Snctm, has recently sold his business and is writing a book about his experience.

 

Bill Maher and Gwyneth Paltrow

image via national inquirer

 

Snctm has been notoriously secretive in the years since its inception, but notable A-list celebrities such as Gwyneth Paltrow and Bill Maher are confirmed attendees.

 

Snctm club

Image Via Toronto Sun

 

Guests of Snctm’s parties normally hail from the richest of the rich. All the members dawn glamorous masks and are required to sign a blood oath to become a VIP. The party takes place at different locations each time, usually yachts or mansions, but the abundance of sex always stays the same. “The grand object of Snctm is the eroticism of the human race,” Lawner told Men’s Health.

 

 

In relation to the upcoming book, Lawner told Page Six, “I am going to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth—as much as my lawyer and editor will allow me to say in print. It’s going to be an exciting read.”

 

Damon Lawner

image via showbiz cheat sheet

 

Whether you’re fascinated by absurd subcultures or you have a genuine interest in posh sex parties, this book is sure to make waves once it’s released.

 

 

Featured Via AvaxNews

Dive Into Summer and Check Out These Bestselling Nonfiction Books!

Each week, Bookstr scans bestseller lists across the Internet to learn what people are reading, buying, gifting, and talking about most — just so we can ensure consistent, high-quality recommendations. This week’s nonfiction picks center are current bestsellers, showcasing which nonfiction books are the biggest hits with audiences! Pick these up to see what everyone is talking about!

 

5. Wally Funk’s Race for Space by Sue Nelson

 

A woman holding a space helmet stands before a rocket ship taking off

Image via Amazon

Wally Funk’s Race For Space by Sue Nelson tells the story of Wally Funk, who was one of the thirteen American female pilots in NASA’s 1961 program: Women in Space. She wanted to become one of the first women astronauts but just one week before the final phase of training, the program was cancelled. This book is a fascinating read, exploring Wally Funk’s life, before, during, and after the failed space venture. Although she may never reach the stars, her story will inspire you to reach for them.

 

4. Some kids I taught and what they taught me  by Kate CLanchy

 

A notebook sitting on some schoolbooks with a pencil

Image via Amazon

 

Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me by Kate Clanchy is an exploration and celebration of her thirty-year teaching career. From the pressures of explaining sex to teenagers, to nurturing a poetry group of refugees, to the regular stresses of coursework, this memoir is an honest exploration of teaching, from its highs to its lows. It is showcase of how vital teaching is and how undervalued it can be to the world at large. This novel will show you why it shouldn’t be.

 

3. The Corner shop by Babita Sharma

 

Image via Amazon

The Corner Shop by Babita Sharma tells of the institution that is still vital to our modern world today, even with the rise of retail. The author was raised in one and had her worldview shaped by gazing out from its tiny confines. Along with learning how to stack shelves and organize items, Babita gained unique political and human insight from the shop. This book is a very interesting look at these shops from her POV, discussing how they are still vital to the world and still beloved by many.

 

2. ‘Superior’ by Angela Saini

Image via Amazon

Superior by Angela Saini is a disturbing read but an essential one. After the horrors the Nazis committed during World War II, the world turned its back on eugenics and the study of ‘race science’. But not all did. Some scientists remained committed to the terrible ideas of race science, believing that certain people are inferior to others. The book explores its horrific origins and how it’s been slowly keeping itself alive thanks to a small group of scientists who remain committed to its ideals. And how, it is today experiencing a horrific resurgence in popularity. At a time where white nationalism is rising, Superior is an examination of the insidious, disturbing, and destructive nature of race science.

 

1. Three Women by Lisa Taddeo 

 

Image Via Amazon

Three Women by Lisa Taddeo is the story of women’s relationship with sex, showcased in a manner that isn’t often seen. Taddeo tells the story of three women’s unmet needs, disappointments, and obsessions. The culmination of many long hours of research over an eight year period, the women featured are: Lisa, who is in an unhappy marriage with two kids, Maggie, who has a fling with her teacher and becomes the center of a small town court case, and Sloane, whose husband likes to watch her have sex with other people. This book is an exposure of erotic fragility in modern America, frank, honest, and up front about women’s relationships with sexual desire.

 

Featured Image Via Amazon 

Maisie Williams and Joe Dempsie

Maisie Williams Talks THAT Arya/Gendry Scene From Episode 2

Spoilers for episode 2 of Game of ThronesGet out now if you haven’t seen it! You good? Okay then.

Episode 2 was a comparatively slower paced episode, allowing us to explore the characters and their relationships perhaps for the last time before the White Walker invasion. It featured great individual moments, like Podrick’s surprisingly great singing skills, Sansa and Theon’s reunion, Bran forgiving Jamie for crippling him, and Brienne being finally made a knight of the seven kingdoms. But the best moment and the one that probably shocked fans the most was Arya and Gendry finally consummating their long-standing crush.

 

Arya Stark and Gendry Baratheon kissing at last

Image Via VanityFair

Yep, Arya finally got laid. The scene began innocently enough, with Gendry finding Arya and giving her the weapon she had request of him in episode 1. Until, that is, the scene took on a more erotically charged flair when Arya began questioning Gendry on how many girls he had before Melisandre and began pointedly removing her gloves. Then as she kissed Gendry and from there, the two got busy. It reminded viewers that Arya was no longer a child and was using that to find some happiness in the night before the battle.

Maisie Williams herself commented on the scene according to Vanity Fair, noting it was Arya’s decision to have sex that made her human again. Noting that human emotions are something Arya has been cutting herself off from, Maisie Williams commented that it was a very ‘human’ decision that grounded her again after so much time away from her family, training to be an assassin and a warrior in isolated parts of the earth. The show runners also noted they gave Williams full control over the scene, with Maisie Williams choosing to have the nudity occur mostly offscreen, noting it was important to focus in on the emotions of the moment and not the sex itself.

The scene itself was quite powerful, showcasing a young woman taking control over her sexuality and engaging in a healthy relationship, especially considering how badly women have been treated in the past throughout Game of Thrones’s history. And since it may be Arya’s last night on earth, this only made the moment more impactful. Hopefully, neither she or Gendry will meet their end next week, considering the army of the dead has now reached Winterfell’s doorstep.

What are your thoughts on the scene? Tell us in the comments!

 

 

Featured Image Via Deadline

Amber Tamblyn

Amber Tablyn’s Debut Novel Set to Release This Month!

Popular film and television actor Amber Tamblyn (The Sisterhood of the Traveling PantsJoan of Arcadia) will be releasing her debut novel this month.

 

 

'Any Man'

Image Via HarperCollins Publishers

 

The book is entitled Any Man and details the story of one woman, Maude, as she hunts down men in bars, online, and even from within the comfort of their own homes and sexually assaults them in the most horrific of ways. The entire story takes place through the perspectives of the victims as they struggle against a justice system that doesn’t believe them, friends and family who shame and alienate them, and a media that hounds them while revealing their personal lives and the details of their assaults to the public. 

 

The novel is meant as a commentary on rape culture and a society that is so obsessed with views and the idea of celebrity that it doesn’t consider the lives it is damaging when it forces victims into the limelight. It also shows the ways in which victims of sexual assault are shamed, quieted, and tossed aside; along with the power and strength it takes to survive something so horrific.

 

It’s also interesting that the novel flips the story so the assailant is a woman and the victims are men. When asked about this, Tamblyn told Buzzfeed:

 

“By flipping the gender norms of rape culture, I hope to elicit some fresh, challenging conversations and examinations of who we are as a society while also allowing readers to relish in what I hope will be one of the most vile, heartless, and haunting female protagonists in modern American fiction.”

 

The novel sounds like it will be dark, unsettling, and all too relevant in a society in which, according to RAINN, an American is assaulted every ninety-eight seconds and one out of every six women will be the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime.

 

Sexual assault is so wildly prevalent in today’s society, new stories seem to appear in the media on a daily basis. The assaults are happening everywhere; HollywoodWall Streetthe militarythe NFLthe White House, and even within our schools.

 

The epidemic of sexual assaults on college campuses was revealed in the Emmy-nominated documentary The Hunting Ground; showing how colleges fail to protect, acknowledge, and find justice for victims despite the fact that one in four women will be sexually assaulted while attending college.

 

This is why Any Man is extremely important and, as someone who has publicly spoken out against assault before, it’s no surprise Tamblyn would choose this as the topic for her first novel.

 

However, despite this being her first extended work of fiction, Tamblyn’s not exactly new to the writing scene. She has a collection of chapbooks she’s self-published and released over the years, along with a collection of poems she released with Harper Collins in 2015 that describes what it means to be an actor in Hollywood, many famous celebrity deaths, and how it feels to be constantly in the limelight, Dark Sparkler.

 

Any Man is set to release on June 26.

 

 

 

Featured Image via Variety

 

Cat yawn

‘Cat Person’ Author Speaks out About Real-Life Inspiration for the Viral Short Story

This past December, a 4,000-word short story took the internet by storm when it was published in The New Yorker. The story is titled Cat Person, and details the trials of twenty-year-old college student Margot as she meets and briefly dates thirty-four-year-old Robert.

 

The all-too-realistic piece of fiction showcases Margot throughout the many quick-changing stages of a blooming, new relationship: the excitement, the giddiness, the butterflies of a growing new crush, the fantasies about everything this relationship could possibly grow into, all the way through unto the grounding realization that this person is not at all who you’d hoped they were.

 

*** SPOILERS AHEAD***

 

The rose colored glasses always begin to fade, and, when they do, Margot realizes Robert is not someone she wants to see. And, by the time everything’s progressed to their first (and only) sexual encounter, Margot’s already realized that she’s not at all attracted to this stranger of a man. She feels repulsion towards him, but doesn’t know how to stop, seeing as sex has already been initiated and they are well in the midst of it all. Margot allows her mind to drift off so she can “just get it over with” while Robert does what he wants until he’s finished:

 

…she felt like a doll again, as she had outside the 7-Eleven, though not a precious one now—a doll made of rubber, flexible and resilient, a prop for the movie that was playing in his head.

 

She ends their relationship shortly after, telling Robert she’s not interested and asking him to stop texting her. The story ends months down the line when Robert gets drunk at Margot’s go-to bar, then spends the remainder of night verbally harassing her via text messages, starting with:

 

“Hi Margot, I saw you out at the bar tonight. I know you said not to text you but I just wanted to say you looked really pretty. I hope you’re doing well!”

“I know I shouldnt say this but I really miss you”

 

And quickly escalating to and ending with:

 

“Answer me”

“Whore.”

 

This story spoke to millions of women of all ages who couldn’t help but see themselves in Margot. The societal expectations placed upon women and girls to always be appeasing, to never come across as difficult, and to never anger or upset the man you are in bed with are an unmanageable weight to bear. This story spread to such immense popularity because it worked to shine a light on the ways in which we are taught that consent always looks like x, y, or z. And that, if you agreed to the encounter initially, there’s no backing out; we are taught to believe that you cannot revoke your yes.

 

I don’t think I, personally, know any women (myself, included) who haven’t been in this exact situation multiple times over the years. Nights that end this way always feel like they’re surrounded by this foggy cloud of discomfort, fear, disappointment, dissociation, and disgust (both with them and with yourself). It’s scary to be alone with someone you don’t know very well, and feel just completely stuck inside their house with no real way out. You never want to be rude by asking to leave, and you also don’t want to anger them for fear of how they might react.

 

It’s the sort of situation where your heart races and your palms sweat and you feel yourself quickly weighing out all of your options until you, eventually, decide that, well, it’s already pretty late and, if you just stick it out until morning, you can go home and shower and pretend it never happened. This way, you avoid any awkward or scary confrontations, and ensure they’re feelings remain unhurt while you just mime your way through the rest of the evening; letting your thoughts wander somewhere else, to some far-off place until it’s all, finally, over. (It doesn’t even have to be a stranger from some Tinder date; we can all-too-often find ourselves ignoring uncomfortable or coercive behavior from people we are already in committed relationships with, allowing them to do what they want under the guise of being in love and being too afraid to rock the boat.)

 

This situation is such a commonality within the dating-sphere, it’s no surprise that author Kristen Roupenian drew from her own personal, real-life experiences to create this story. Roupenian spoke to The Times earlier this week, opening up about her own Cat Person for the very first time.

 

It all started when Roupenian, who had spent many years in a long-term committed relationship, found herself single at thirty-five for the first time since she was in her twenties:

 

When I was 26 and dating, I was such a mess and everything was terrible. I thought now I would be a mature adult and wouldn’t screw up and would understand when people are garbage right away. But instead I felt just as smacked by it and just as confused…I went on a date, it went poorly, and we got in a fight. And that’s alright, but I thought, ‘I’m 35, how did I make this mistake? How did I misread someone so completely?

 

The story grew to success seemingly overnight, and resulted in Roupenian landing a two-book deal with Scout Press, including a collection of short-stories set to release in 2019 and a currently untitled novel.

 

The success was by no accident, however. The story resonated, and still resonates, with people across the board.

 

Dating is never as easy as any of us hope it’s going to be. And, it can be difficult when you’re meeting all of these people to not feel tired of it all, and just ready to settle down with the next semi-charming, borderline-compatible adult human you stumble across. But, once you’ve already begun to force a connection with someone and convince yourself of it’s sustainability, it can be nearly impossible to come to terms with how you genuinely feel, walk out, and leave the situation behind you.

 

Roupenian went on to tell the Times about her own views surrounding the dating culture our society has built:

 

I think that young women in particular feel they have to manage and control and soothe and charm and weave this magic around men…The truth is, most people are not the right person for you, and the person who is the right person for you will still not be a perfect human being.

 

Since the Cat Person publication, Roupenian has learned she was never really alone in this thinking. Women all over have shared their own stories of uncomfortable dates that have ended in aggression, shame, and coercion.

 

I only hope that, now that a light has been shone on the aspects of dating and consent that before we had only ever been told to deal with and ignore, we can finally begin to see a shift in what we do and do not consider normal, healthy, and okay. 

 

In the meantime, we can continue sharing our stories. We can acknowledge and find comfort in the autonomy of our own bodies, and the fact that no one, no matter what their previous relationship to us may be, is allowed to steal that from us. We can refuse to accept the things that feel uncomfortable, scary, or harmful, and not feel any embarrassment, guilt, or shame in vocalizing that. We can understand and accept our own imperfect humanness, and work on erasing both our desire to mold and shift others’ views of us and our impossible desire to never disappoint.

 

We can keep standing up and speaking out. 

 

 

 

Featured Image via Sykesville Veterinary Clinic