Tag: Sarah A. Denzil

'Saving April' by Sarah A. Denzil VS 'The Woman in the Window' by A.J. Finn

First Deception, Now Plagiarism: New Dan Mallory Scandal

Want to read Dan Mallory‘s thriller The Woman in the Window but don’t want to support someone who lied about having terminal cancer? That shouldn’t be a problem: Sarah A. Denzil‘s Saving April has nearly the same plot.

If you missed our earlier article on Mallory’s cancer lies, click the link or continue for a summary of the horrifying details. The thriller author’s recent notoriety should have been more fatal to his career than the cancer he falsely claimed to have. Instead, there have been few professional repercussions-a plot twist many attribute to Mallory’s race (white) and gender (male). Behaviors that may have doomed another writer or editor’s career-speaking in a fake British accent, allegedly leaving cups of urine around the office, pretending to have two PhDs while having exactly zero PhDs-seem benign when considering the big, ugly lies. Mallory did not have terminal cancer; his mother did not have terminal cancer; his father was not dead; his brother did not kill himself. The bigger, uglier truth, is that these falsehoods are unlikely to slow the sales of this runaway bestseller.

Mallory’s second novel is in the works. His publisher, William Morrow, has shown continued support.

 

Dan Mallory at an author event

Image Via Ny Times

To those just jumping in on the Dan-Mallory-is-a-liar bandwagon, you may be wondering, “could any of it really be true?” Bluntly, no. In an official apology (if that’s what his evasive statement actually was), Mallory admitted to his never having cancer. While he claimed his lies about a physical illness were to conceal his bipolar II diagnosis, psychology professionals say that the disorder would not cause organized, deliberate deception over an extended period of time. This was not an offhanded lie-Mallory impersonated his brother in emails, describing his (Mallory’s) own devastating wit and inspiring bravery in the face of terminal illness. Yikes. Also, all of his family members are distinctly not dead. So there’s that.

Unfortunately for everyone but Dan Mallory (and his loyal publisher), the novel was an instant #1 bestseller, the first debut to top the charts in eleven years.  The resounding success of The Woman in the Window is no joke and no lie-but the novel itself may also have its basis in deception.

 

Author Sarah Denzil

Image Via Sarah Denzil

A recent New York Times article has drawn comparisons between The Woman in the Window and Saving April, a 2016 bestseller from British author Sarah A. Denzil. If you don’t mind mild spoilers, let’s take a look at the similarities in a tidy, damning list form.

Both novels include the following:

  1. Anxious, middle-aged female protagonists… One named Hannah, one named Anna…
  2. …who discover something awful when spying through a window.
  3. They discover something awful about their neighbors, who…
  4. are an unhappily married couple and their troubled adopted child.
  5. The troubled adopted child has a birth mother with substance abuse issues.
  6. The protagonists are wracked with guilt over their past car crashes…
  7. …which killed their husbands and young daughters…
  8. all because they were distracted during a fight about their husband’s infidelity.
  9. Unreliable narrators whose use of alcohol leads police not to trust them.
  10. The same exact final plot twist.

“It is the EXACT same plot like down to the main characters’ back story,” reads an Amazon review comparing the two eerily similar novels. “Sorry but there’s no way the amount of stolen material is a coincidence.”

 

'Saving April' by Sarah A. Denzil VS 'The Woman in the Window' by A.J. Finn

Image Via Ny Times

While it’s true that many crime novels share similar attributes, the timeline is also suspicious. Denzil’s novel hit shelves in early 2016; Mallory didn’t sell his novel until autumn of the same year. Mallory claims to have written his own thriller during summer 2015. Since he also claimed every member of his family was dead, his statement seems impossible to unilaterally believe. The Times article reports that Denzil has spoken out about her discomfort with the similarities-specifically, regret that some online reviewers believe Mallory’s book was the original. (It wasn’t.) Readers and writers across the Internet are asking the same question: is the book plagiarized?

Here’s a question with a more upsetting answer: if it is, will it matter?

The most effective accusations of plagiarism come when an author has copied another’s specific language or phrasing. Theft of creative intellectual property (plot points, characters) is much harder to prove-particularly in cases of genre fiction, where beloved tropes abound. As a result, most authors choose not to pursue legal action.

One such rare lawsuit occurred recently between fantasy authors Sherrilyn Kenyon (Dark-Hunter books) and Cassandra Clare (Shadowhunters franchise). The series are similar in the broadest sense: both feature demon-fighting characters who protect the ordinary world, ordinary objects imbued with magical powers, and swords with names. Though Kenyon’s claims were dubious, this particular case illuminates the problem of intellectual property suits.

 

Comparisons between Kenyon and Clare's work, as outlined by Clare's lawyer

Image Via Cassandra Clare

Sherrilyn Kenyon didn’t invent glowing swords, and Sarah A. Denzil didn’t invent unreliable female narrators. But Dan Mallory did sell his book after Saving April‘s successful release… and he’s lied about everything else. While it’s unlikely that Denzil will endure the financial and emotional burdens of a copyright lawsuit, it is regrettably even less likely that it would make a difference in the face of Mallory’s financial success.

 

Featured Image Via NY Times