Tag: representation

Two Hugo Finalists Trying to Turn Silver to Gold

The Hugo Awards, the annual award for science fiction, will announce their winner later in the week, but for now, there are two finalists which are the first in their series—so you can start reading right now, and be ready for the winner this weekend.

 

Trail of Lightning, by Rebecca Roanhorse

Trail of Lightning

Image Via Amazon

 

Maggie is a post-apocalyptic Navajo monster hunter, and that’s just the beginning. When a girl goes missing in a small town, she’s forced to team up with a medicine man to travel the reservation, uncovering secrets and coming closer and closer to a monster more terrible than either can imagine. An immersive flooded world, filled with gods and monsters, and characters with enough sarcasm and attitude to bear the weight of a dark plot and devastated world.

This has already swept a few awards, and is sure to be a good pick for anyone who likes any supernatural or speculative genres.

 

 

Spinning Silver, by Naomi Novik

Image Via Amazon

 

You may have noticed by now I’m A LITTLE OBSESSED with Naomi Novik, but hey, the experts back me up. This is sort of a fairy tale, related to Rumpelstiltskin, but you always get much more than you can possibly foresee with Novik.

Since her father is running the family business into the ground, Miryim takes matters into her own hands. For better or worse, she’s very good at debt collecting, and ends up catching the attention of the supernatural—the icy Staryk—and it only gets more dire from there. You can expect gloriously lush world building and characters who feel like real people.

 

 

 

Featured image Via Pixels

Children’s Books Need More Black Representation

Children’s books are powerful tools that help instill a sense of empathy in young readers. They are testing grounds for new ideas and exercises in ethics. Reading, at any age, teaches us that the experiences of other people are not only valid, but influential to our own lives. It’s for this reason that representation in children’s books matters.

According to reporting from Cooperative Children’s Book Center of Education, in a study of 2,500 titles, less than 1 percent of books for children and teens had Black authors or illustrators in 1985. Although that number has improved more than 30 years later, only 10 percent of children’s books featured black characters in 2018, while 27 percent of them featured animals or other characters who aren’t human.

Image result for black children book

Image via pintrest

America’s school’s are heavily segregated, and to under-represent a specific group of people is to feed into an already divided educational system. Black children need to see themselves expressed in children’s lit, and white children need to see their peers in equal measures. As racial tensions increase in America, it will be imperative for young readers to empathize with people who have different backgrounds and skin color.

Mary Taris

Image via Atlanta black star

Mary Taris, the CEO for Strive Publishing and an advocate for black YA, told the Atlanta Black Star: “All in all, I’d say it’s not enough for a book to just be about African American characters. They also have to have an authentic portrayal of African American characters in order for them to truly be a mirror for Black children and teens.”

There is an increasing demand for black representation in children’s literature, and people like Mary Taris are leading the fight.

 

Featured Image Via: Daily Express

 

red white and royal blue

Amazon to Adapt LGBTQ Hit ‘Red, White & Royal Blue’ for TV

Berlanti Productions is still going strong, even without any future seasons of Arrow lined up after next year’s Season 8 conclusion.

Deadline reports that Amazon Studios and Berlanti Productions will be adapting Casey McQuiston’s Red White & Royal Blue, one of 2019’s most anticipated LGBTQ novels about an unexpected power couple romance.

 

Red White Royal Blue

Image via Amazon

 

Red White & Royal Blue follows America’s favorite son, White House royal-equivalent, Alex Claremont-Diaz, as he falls in love with former across the pond enemy, Prince Henry. The surprise romance causes all sorts of diplomatic complications between the two nations, and Alex’s relationship problems will be taken to another level.

The highly anticipated novel appears to be in good hands. Juilliard Playwriting graduate Ted Malawer will pen the adaptation, and Berlanti Productions has developed LGBTQ content with favorable audience approval, especially after its recent success with introducing LGBTQ superhero icon, Batwoman, to television (She was the only memorable part of that Arrowverse TV crossover).

While there is no release date for the rom-com adaptation, the novel will be published by Macmillan next month.

 

 

 

Featured Image via Deadline