Tag: Reading List

Literary Canon Update

Have you ever been given a reading list that’s written, translated, and selected exclusively by and for men? Odds are you’ve rarely seen any that aren’t. If you want to appreciate the cannon while also living in a world where women exist, this is the list for you. These books and translations are some of the best and most lauded of all time, and yes, they’re by women.

It was, I must confess, a little hard to compile. The Odyssey was first translated by a woman only in 2017! But don’t despair. It’s all here for the taking.

 

The Iliad and the Odyssey

 

Homer’s epics have been translated MANY times, but these, by Caroline Alexander and Emily Wilson, respectively, set an incredible standard.

 

The Iliad

 

 

Close as can be to the ancient Greek, this translations has garnered heaping praise. “[T]he guard has changed, and a new gold standard has appeared”, said New Criterion at the volume’s publication. This edition even manages to retain the original line numbers from the Greek.

 

The Odyssey

 

 

This work, too, matches the original Greek as closely as possible. “A staggeringly superior translation―true, poetic, lively and readable, and always closely engaged with the original Greek”, said Harvard classics professor Richard F. Thomas. Iambic pentameter imitates the lyricism of the original Greek, and the volume also includes translation guides and maps.

 

 

Antigonik and An Oresteia

 

 

For both of these it is possible to turn to Anne Carson, a Canadian translator and classics professor. Carson’s translations are modern, elegant, and never condescending. In stead of translated, the works seem brought into the light, with all their strangeness and fierceness intact.

 

 

Jane Austen

 

How is it that Jane Austen, often the only woman on a reading list, is still under hyped? I had a guy in a bar tell me once that if people like Austen it’s because they haven’t read a lot of books. He really said that. Family conflict, human stories, and scathing humor makes Austen worth reading, with characters you really will love, and hate.

 

Pride & Prejudice

 

It’s a staple for a reason, and if you’re not sure you’ll relate to these people’s problems, you’re wrong. Fuckboys, impending poverty, poor decisions, and character growth you can get behind. Plus, it may be a period piece, but people still love their sisters. You’ll relate.

 

 

Jane Eyre

 

 

Another classic people want to avoid, but it has everything: deaths, fire, lies, weddings, blindness. I wouldn’t exactly call Jane a relateable character, but she’s understandable, I think, when you see everything she’s been through. And she’s incredibly decisive.

 

 

 

Images via Amazon 

Top Picks-Five YA That’ll Broaden Your Horizons!

Each week, Bookstr will be looking at some of the best novels in a particular genre for your ever growing TBR pile.

Today, we are looking at some of the most sought after Young Adult novels that will pull you into their world and broaden your horizons.

 

 

5-Wilder Girls by Rory Power

 

Rory Power

Image Via Penguin Random House

 

Crime fiction editor Rory Power’s debut novel is part gripping-post-apocalyptic-romance, part-high-octane-thriller, and all heart that you should definitely check out.

 

Wilder Girls

Image Via Amazon

 

We are transported to the world of Hetty where she lives in Raxter School for Girls, trapped there thanks to a horrific plague that put the world in disarray. But when Byatt goes missing, Hetty will have to break quarantine an brave the horrors that lie beyond the fence…

Kirkus Reviews call it “a staggering gut punch of a book,” Young Folks pleads “I’m desperate for more”, and we here at Bookstr hope that Powers writes another novel that’s even half-as-good as this July 9th release.

 

4-Vow of Thieves by Mary E Pearson

 

Mary E Pearson

Image Via Goodreads

A masterclass in Young Adult Fiction, Mary E Pearson’s A Room on Lorelei Street won the 2006 Golden Kite Award for fiction. Her book The Adoration of Jenna Fox was a finalist for the Andre Norton Award, and her newest release has shocked and awed old and new readers alike. A sequel to Dance of Thieves (which is set in the same world as The Remnant Chronicles), Vow of Thieves was released this past August 6th and it should be in everyone’s hands.

 

Vow of Thieves (Dance of Thieves Book 2)

Image Via Amazon

 

Elite soldier and skilled thief Kazi and Jase Ballenger are madly in love and it seems to be happily-ever-after since the end of the last book, but we still got a whole book to go. Outside threats are a sure thing, but betrayals run deep and deadly when someone in their circle traps them in a web of deceit…

Those who love hard-won victories and dark fantasy will love this novel, especially if they thirst for buckets of blood. In the words of Kirkus Reviews, this August 6th release is “[a] smashing, satisfying adventure”

 

 

3-Hello Girls by Brittany Cavallaro and Emily Henry

Brittany Cavallaro and Emily Henry

Britanny Cavallaro (top) and Emily Henry (bottom)/ Image Via The Nerd Daily

 

Brittany Cavallaro has written A Study in Charlotte, A Question of Holmes, The Case for Jamie, and many more. Joining her is Emily Henry who has written When the Sky Fell on Splendor, The Love That Split the World, and A Million Junes.

 

Hello Girls

Image Via Amazon

 

Together, they bring us Hello Girls.

On one hand we have Winona whose perfect father isn’t perfect at all. The short of it, he locks the pantry door to control her eating habits and beats her behind closed doors. On the other hand, we have Lucille whose is barely getting by thanks to her thankless job as a waitress and her emotionally unstable mother and drug-dealing brother.

When Winona and Lucille meet, they realize that when graduation comes they need to get out of here as quickly as possibly.

They steal a convertible and go on a road trip from their small Michigan town to Chicago, running away from their old life and entering a new one where the only person they can depend on is each other.

Kirkus Reviews says the book “provides a fun, fast-paced plot with resourceful feminist protagonists,” and that’s basically all you need to know from this August 6th release

 

2-Frankly in Love by David Yoon

 

David Yoon

Image Via Entertainment Weekly

 

This might be his debut novel, but David Yoon has already made a lot of headway.

 

YA's Next Superstar

Image Via Davidyoon.com

 

He’s the Illustrator of Everything, Everything, and his book has already got Entertainment Weekly calling him “YA’s Next Superstar” (which he notes as “a little dramatic to say the least“), and Kirkus Reivews calls his novel “deeply moving account of love in its many forms”.

Okay, but what’s this book about?

 

Frankly in Love

Image Via Amazon

 

Frank Li is a Korean American, born and raised in Southern California. His life seems to be going well when he meets the girl of his dreams: Brit Means. They get along and love each other, but his parents want him to find a Korean girl and Brit, well, she’s white

So Frank teams up with Joy Song, a family friend whose in a familiar bind. Together, they come up with a plan to keep their parents off their backs while they stay with the people they love.

But things don’t always work out the way you plan.

Want to check it out? A lot of people will when it releases this September 10th!

 

1-Slay by BriTTNEy Morris

Brittany Morris

Image Via Publisher’s Weekly

 

After seeing Black Panther in the theaters, “I left the theater a Wakandian queen,” Brittney Morris explained. Same thing the second time she saw it. Following that high, it took her eleven days to write this sure-to-be bestseller Slay.

 

SLAY

Image Via Amazon

 

At school, seventeen-year-old Kiera Johnson is an honors student, a math tutor, and one of the only Black kids at Jefferson Academy.

At home, Kiera joins hundreds of thousands of Black gamers who duel in the worldwide role-playing game SLAY.

When a teen is Kansas City is murdered over a dispute in SLAY, news outlets blame the video game, labeling it as racist, exclusion, and a violent hubs for thugs and criminals. Some even threaten to the developer for “anti-white discrimination”.

No one knows it, not even her closest friends, but Kiera is, in fact, the developer.

Kirkus Reviews claims that “[g]amers and black activists alike will be ready to SLAY all day” and we here at Bookstr promise that this book will be the next best thing when it reaches a bookshelf near you this September 24th.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon

8 of Michelle Obama’s Must-Reads

Book lovers and Obama supporters alike wait with anticipation every year to hear Barrack Obama’s book picks for that summer. Fortunately, you now have another round of books to choose from thanks to Michelle who has a few book recommendations of her own. Despite your ever-growing to-be-read pile, when Michelle Obama tells you to read a certain book, you listen!

Following the release of her own memoir, Becoming, Michelle reveals eight more must-reads in her “By the Book” interview, published on December 6, 2018 in the New York Times. Other titles come from an interview with Jenna Bush Hager and a memorial posted on Instagram for what would have been a Holocaust victim’s ninetieth birthday.

 

 

8-Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Song of Solomon

Image Via Image via The Stanford Daily

 

Part of the reason why Morrison received the 1993 Nobel Prize for Literature, Song of Solomon follows the life of Michigan native, Macon through his life as he searches for a sense of identity.

 

7-The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train

Image Via Image via Penguin Books Australia

 

Before the major motion picture, Rachel was just a girl who liked to ride the train everyday to London and back. It’s definitely not because the train passes her ex-husband’s house or the because she can see the perfect couple she envies so who live a few houses down. Definitely not.

 

 

6-White Teeth by Zadie Smith

White Teeth

Image Via Image via Book Riot

 

Smith’s London-centric novel follows two friends, one Bangladeshi and one Englishman, as they navigate family, friendship and life in the city.

 

5-Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl

Image via Apple Books

 

The archetype for unreliable narrators, Gone Girl will have you guessing until the very last page. Follow Nick and her husband Amy who disappears, but why…and how…and where?

 

4-An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage

Image Via Image via Oneworld Publications

 

Jones’ novel follows newlyweds who separate after a daunting rape trial. When they reunite later in life, things somehow get even more complicated.

 

 

3-Educated by Tara Westover

Educated

Image via Booktopia

 

Westover’s biographical memoir tells the story of how she fell in love with learning after growing up with little to none of it at all.

 

2-The Diary of Anne Frank by Anne Frank

The Diary of Anne Frank

Image Via Image via Book Depository

 

Frank’s diary which she kept as a young girl before her family was sent to concentration camps during the Holocaust relay the horrors of the terrible tragedy.

 

1-Commonwealth by Anne Patchett

Commonwealth

Image Via Inprint

 

Patchett’s bestseller tells the story of a family whose dynamic gets turned upside down at a family christening and what happens when that child grows up and decides to share that story.

 

 

Featured Image via AARP

Top Picks: Crime and Thriller Books You’ll Go Crazy For

Each week, Bookstr gives you a look at some of the best novels in a particular genre for your continued reading list.

Today, we’ll be recommending five highly anticipated Crime and Thrillers that you will shock you into delight.

 

5. Never Look Back by Alison Gaylin

Image Via www.alisongaylin.com

The Edgar award-winning author of eleven books, Alison Gaylin is a writer you should definitely have on your to-be-read list. Her latest novel, mysteriously titled Never Look Back, was released July 2nd.

Back in 1976, thirteen days were filled with death as murderers April Cooper and Gabriel LeRoy terrorized South California, a murder spree that ended in a blazing fire that took those killers lives.

Forty years later, podcast producer Quentin Garrison wants to know get to the bottom of what happened with these grisly killers. But then he discovers something shocking: April may still be alive.

Meanwhile, New York City film columnist Robin Diamond finds reason to believe that her mother might be the infamous killer. With Garrison on the hunt and her reputation at stake, is there anyone she can trust?

Kirkus Reviews calls this novel “[a] mind-bending mystery, an insightful exploration of parent-child relationships, and a cautionary tale about bitterness and blame”.

 

4. The Heart Keeper by Alex Dahl

Image Via Penguin Random House

Critically acclaimed author of The Boy at the Door, Alex Dahl teased us with her newest novel in an interview when she said, “It was a hard book to write— it gets pretty dark in places, but I really wanted to write a grief novel with the plotline and traction of a thriller. I’m very excited about it, and hope the end-result will be a creepy tear-jerker!”

So what is the novel about? Well…

After years of struggling with a heart condition, Kaia receives a new heart. Now things are finally looking up for her and her mother Iselin, especially after they make friends with an affluent young woman.

But that affluent young woman is Alison, the mother of a daughter whose death gave Kaia life, and grief will turn into a terrible obsession.

Released July 2nd, this story showcases the thin line between love and obsession.

 

3. The Need by Helen Phillips

Image Via Vulture

Recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and the Italo Calvino Prize, Helen Philips’ newest novel has received heaps of praised.

Here’s what it is about:

Home alone with her two children, Molly hears a noise. It’s worst-case scenario when she finds herself face-to-face with an intruder who knows way too much about her and her family.

With a hook like that, what more do you need?

If you’re somehow not convinced, Kirkus Reviews calls it “suspenseful and mysterious, insightful and tender,” and says that “Phillips’ new thriller cements her standing as a deservedly celebrated author with a singular sense of story and style.”

Released July 9th, this book if one you should definitively check out if you like tight, suspenseful stories that are all too real.

2. Lady in the Lake by Laura LIppman

Image Via Baltimore Sun

With a career spanning over twenty years, Laura Lippman is a name that you should be familiar with. It’s always a treat whenever she releases a new novel, and her latest is sure to thrill us.

Set in the tumultuous year of 1966 in Baltimore, Maddie Schwartz wants to make a name for herself now that she’s bolted away from her controlling husband. Working at the newspaper, Maddie finds just the story to do it: the body of a missing woman has been discovered in the city park lake’s fountain.

The body belongs to Cleo Sherwood, a young black woman, and as Maddie investigates she’ll have to look beyond her own needs before tragedy strikes again.

Kirkus Reviews notes that “[t]he racism, classism, and sexism of fifty years ago wrapped up in a stylish, sexy, suspenseful period drama about a newsroom and the city it covers.”

Coming July 23rd, this book about race and class is one any fan of thrills and suspense should check out!

1. The Bird Boys by Lisa Sandlin

 

Image Via Cinco Puntos Press

This is a late release, but it’s definitely something that should be on your reading list because its from accomplished writer and teacher, Lisa Sandlin.

A sequel to 2015 The Do-Right, this new novel follows Delpha Wade. After nearly being killed, Wade is released from the hospital but her boss, Private Investigator Tom Phelan, desperately needs her help.

Thus, Wade is back in action, digging through old records and knocking on doors to unravel a dangerous case of two brothers and how it connects to a grand larceny. As Wade and Phelan unravel the mystery, they will discover that “sometimes truth is not true, but murder is always murder“.

Kirkus Reviews assures that this novel is proof “that anything old can be new in the right, talented hands,” and that “Sandlin has crafted an outstanding series that readers will want to follow and savor”.

With praise like that, this novel is sure to dazzle and surprise us when her latest book hits shelves August 20th.

 

 

Let us know what you think of our suggestions in the comments! Hopefully, you’ll add some of these for your ongoing reading list.

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon

Top Genre Picks: Crime/Thrillers

Each week, Bookstr will be offering a look at some of the best novels in a particular genre for your continued reading list. Today, we’ll be recommending five recent crime/thrillers for your reading pleasure. Thrillers and crime novels often overlap, containing equal amounts of suspense, anxiety, anticipation, and shock. These novels will certainly set you on edge and leave you guessing until the very end.

 

The cover to the Boy by Tami Hoag, featuring numerous reeds against a blue set sky

Image Via Goodreads

1. ‘The Boy’ by Tami Hoag

The Boy by Tami Hoag has quickly shot up the New York Times bestsellers list and it’s easy to see why. The premise of the novel is that a detective, Nick Fourcade, enters into a home in Louisiana to discover a young boy of seven murdered by an alleged intruder, yet his mother appears to be unhurt and there is no sign of forced entry. The waters are further muddled when the boy’s babysitter goes missing. All fingers begin to point to the mother as the murderer of her own child but Nick thinks there may be more to the case than meets the eye. With a premise like that, this is a must read that will keep you guessing until the very end.

The cover to the Drowning by J.P. Smith, featuring a ladder descending into a shallow lake

Image Via Goodreads

2. ‘The Drowning’ by J.p. Smith

The Drowning by J.P. Smith isn’t an easy read but it’s a great one. Alex Mason, a camp counselor, leaves a young boy in the middle of the lake to teach him a lesson but the boy vanishes. Alex doesn’t tell the truth, leaving the death to be forgotten, until twenty years later he begins receiving threatening notes from the boy, Joey Proctor. But Joey is dead. Or is he? With a strong prose, an excellent hook for its creepy plot, The Drowning is a book that’ll keep you guessing until the very end. Alex Mason is a multilayered protagonist, at once unsympathetic yet showing enough humanity for the audience to be on his side. Check this one out for sure.

 

The cover of My Lovely Wife featuring a woman looking at herself in the mirror of a knife

Image Via Amazon

3. ‘My Lovely Wife’ by Samantha Downing

This one isn’t technically out yet, but it’s received excellent early reviews and features a wild as hell premise that’s impossible to ignore. My Lovely Wife is about a married couple who engages in a new activity to keep their marriage alive. One catch: the activity in question is murder. The book is described as deliciously wicked, dark, and ‘completely crazy’ but in a good way! This one is suggested to just go in blind, so we won’t give in anything away, so pick this one up when it hits shelves March 26th.

The cover to the Stranger Diaries, featuring a house being carved in half in a cozy suburb

Image Via Goodreads

4. ‘The Stranger Diaries’ by Elly Griffiths

The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths is a modern gothic fantasy, themed around literary killings. Clare Cassidy specializes in a course revolving around gothic writer R.M. Holland. But when a dead body turns up with a quote from Holland’s story, ‘The Stranger’, Elly Griffiths is drawn into a dark murder mystery, as more murders begin to pop up themed around Clare’s beloved book. To make matters worse, Clare receives a note in her personal diary, from the killer that says ‘Hello, Clare. You don’t know me.” This should be a must read for literature fans, especially since the killings are themed around literature!

A young woman walking in a snow drenched filed in a red coat Image Via Goodreads

5. ‘The Reckoning’ by Yrsa Sigurdardottir 

The second novel in the Children’s House series, a series of psychological thrillers that examines police procedurals in Scandinavia. This novel deals with series characters Huldar and Freyja, a detective and a child psychologist respectively. In the present time dismembered limbs begin popping all over town, while flashbacks deal with a young girl who went to use the phone at her friend’s house and didn’t return. The mystery gets quite dark, but leaves readers invested in seeing it through to the end, thanks to the author’s strong sense of characterization and excellent atmosphere. Its not an easy read but well worth the ride.

Will you be picking up any of these thrillers? Let us know in the comments!

Featured Image Via Deadline