Tag: Read

5 Memes About Reading Books to Make You Laugh

One of my favorite things about sharing a common love of reading with other individuals is the community that arises around various stories and genres. It’s just nice having someone who can get why a story left you curled up in emotional agony because it’s entirely possible that this person had a similar reaction. We might talk about it in person, or we might have a heated argument on a forum. Regardless though, there are multiple ways to express this love for books and stories.

And one way that people share this love is through memes.

Oh yeah. Here are five memes about books and reading to make you laugh.

 

 

1.

Image via Ball memes

 

If a book can make you feel strong emotions, then it’s doing a good job. If I am sitting on the floor, crying because nothing is going right for the main character in a story, then the book is doing a good job. If I absolutely despise the antagonist, then the book is doing a good job. If the story keeps me riveted and emotionally invested in a fictional character’s life, then…you get the idea.

 

2.

image via loldamn

 

This is basically what it looked like every time I ordered my textbooks online. There was that one time I ordered an encyclopedia that was so thick, the mail carrier came to my door, gave the package to my roommate, and then said, “I swear, I didn’t open this. The book was so big the package wouldn’t stay shut.”

 

3.

image via Pinterest

 

Part of me loves reading books where I care about the characters and their plights. The other part of me fears it because I know how quickly things can go wrong in stories and that eventually, the tale will end. Don’t get me wrong: stories need to end at some point. Be that after the first book or the fourteenth, I genuinely think that a story needs to conclude. That doesn’t make it easy though, and I most certainly will go through a period of mourning.

 

 

4.

image via Memebase

 

Even though I try to invest my full energy into books, sometimes this happens. It’s even worse when I realize that it hasn’t just been one page… it has been twenty.

 

5.

image via Mjoly

 

When I’m interrupted while reading, I’m interrupted frequently. It once took me fifteen minutes to finish two pages because I was interrupted four times.

 

Featured Image Via LiveAbout

 

 

 


Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please join our Patreon to support our writers and creators or donate to our Paypal and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.
Become a Patron!

 

5 Books Inspired by Norse Mythology

Norse mythology is definitely a favorite for many people, and I think we can see why. We have some fantastic deities, like Loki and Thor, who have appeared in comic book serializations for decades now. We have myths that are hilarious enough to hold our attentions. I’m thinking of the Mead of Poetry in particular (a myth that Neil Gaiman retells in his book Norse Mythology). Frankly, these are myths that draw us in because of how epic and enthralling they are in their scope and storytelling. We have warrior gods and goddesses, jötunns, elves, and dwarves – to name but a few.

So it’s only natural then that some authors would refer back to this mythos for inspiration.

Here are five books inspired by Norse mythology.

 

 

 

1. The gospel of loki

 

image via goodreads

Written by Joanne M. Harris, this is the first book in her Loki series which, you guessed it, follows Loki, the trickster god. If anyone is interested, Harris also has a book series simply called Runemarks, which plays with Norse mythology and retells it in a fun, modernized way. The Gospel of Loki retells how the trickster god was recruited by Odin and how he is treated by the other Asgardians. Plus, to make this story even more appealing, it is told from Loki’s sarcastic, snarky point of view.

 

2. Hilda and the troll

 

image via goodreads

You might be familiar with the Netflix adaptation of this adorable graphic novel. Written and illustrated by Luke Pearson, Hilda and The Troll follows Hilda, a young girl who loves to explore and befriend mythical creatures with some distinct Norse roots. She eventually moves to Trollberg, a human city, with her mother, but her adventures only continue in the cityscape with her new friends. The artwork is beautiful and the story is absolutely endearing. While this series is definitely geared towards younger audiences, I am of the mind that all ages can enjoy it. After all, there are little elves, trolls, moving mountains, talking crows, and so much more.

 

3. The Long dark tea-time of the soul

 

image via goodreads

Typically, I try to keep most of the books on lists like these to more recent publications that may not have gotten a great deal of attention. However, Douglas Adams (author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy) is one of those writers who definitely needs a place on this list. This is the second book in Adams’ Dirk Gently series, which has also recently been adapted into a television series. Dirk Gently is a detective who doesn’t just handle the possible, but also the impossible and improbable. In The Long Dark Tea-Time of The Soul, it comes to Dirk’s attention that a passenger check-in desk at Heathrow airport has disappeared into a ball of light. This is being perceived as an act of god, but this then begs the question: which god?

 

 

4. Hammered

 

image via goodreads

Just to preface, this is the third book in Kevin Hearne‘s Iron Druid series. There are several novels and novellas, and this series is most certainly the gift that keeps on giving in my not-so-humble opinion. These stories follow Atticus O’Sullivan, the last druid who has relocated to Arizona where he runs a bookshop and sells magic teas. Hammered portrays Thor, the god of thunder, as a bully who has ruined lives and killed many. Now, Atticus’ vampire viking friend, Leif Helgarson, enlists the druid to help him get revenge on Thor. This story involves an army of frost giants and battle with the forces of Asgard… with plenty of other pantheons and other mythologies joining the fray.

 

5. the blood-tainted winter

 

image via goodreads

Written by T.L. GreylockThe Blood-Tainted Winter follows Raef Skallagrim, a man who wants to set sail on the ocean, following the sea road. He and his crew wish to be famous and recognized by the gods themselves. Yet Raef’s father and an impending war make it so that Raef must set his dream to the side and answer the call of duty. He must learn to navigate the tides of war while also seeking out revenge. Yet in the end, this will be a war that affects even the gods. This is the first book in The Song of The Ash Tree series.

 

 

Featured image via Deposit Photos


Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please join our Patreon to support our writers and creators or donate to our Paypal and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.
Become a Patron!




 

5 Fantasy Books Set for Release This Month

As the new year dawns, so too does another year of books. While I can’t give you all of the releases for this coming year, I can provide you with a list of five fantasy books that are set for release this month. After all, is there a better way to start the new year than with a book hot off the printing press? For more fantasy books set for release this month, check out Tor’s article!

Here are 5 books that are set to be released this month.

 

 

1. “Dark and deepest Red”

Image via goodreads

Written by Anne-Marie McLemore, Dark and Deepest Red is set to be released by the time of this article’s publication. The book’s Goodreads page provides this summary of the story,

“Summer, 1518. A strange sickness sweeps through Strasbourg: women dance in the streets, some until they fall down dead. As rumors of witchcraft spread, suspicion turns toward Lavinia and her family, and Lavinia may have to do the unimaginable to save herself and everyone she loves. Five centuries later, a pair of red shoes seal to Rosella Oliva’s feet, making her dance uncontrollably. They draw her toward a boy who knows the dancing fever’s history better than anyone: Emil, whose family was blamed for the fever five hundred years ago. But there’s more to what happened in 1518 than even Emil knows, and discovering the truth may decide whether Rosella survives the red shoes.”

This story is definitely borrowing inspiration from Han Christian Anderson’s fairy tale “The Red Shoes,” which, based on the version one reads, has a very grisly ending. All I know is that I, personally, will be grabbing up a copy of this book.

 

 

2. “Infinity son”

image via goodreads

Infinity Son, the first book in Adam Silvera‘s Infinity Cycle is set for release this month. The book’s Goodreads page provides the following description:

“Growing up in New York, brothers Emil and Brighton always idolized the Spell Walkers—a vigilante group sworn to rid the world of specters. While the Spell Walkers and other celestials are born with powers, specters take them, violently stealing the essence of endangered magical creatures. Brighton wishes he had a power so he could join the fray. Emil just wants the fighting to stop. The cycle of violence has taken a toll, making it harder for anyone with a power to live peacefully and openly. In this climate of fear, a gang of specters has been growing bolder by the day.”

This is definitely worth a read.

 

 

3. “A Queen in Hiding”

image via goodreads

Sarah Kozloff’s debut novel A Queen in Hiding will be released in the third week of January, and it sounds fascinating. Goodreads provides the following book description:

Orphaned, exiled and hunted, Cérulia, Princess of Weirandale, must master the magic that is her birthright, become a ruthless guerilla fighter, and transform into the queen she is destined to be. But to do it she must win the favor of the spirits who play in mortal affairs, assemble an unlikely group of rebels, and wrest the throne from a corrupt aristocracy whose rot has spread throughout her kingdom.”

Who doesn’t love a story about a queen regaining her throne?

 

 

 

4. “The Bard’s Blade”

image via goodreads

The Bard’s Blade, the first book Brian D. Anderson‘s series The Sorcerer’s Song will also be released in the third week of January. Here is an excerpt from the book summary:

“Mariyah enjoys a simple life in Vylari, a land magically sealed off from the outside world, where fear and hatred are all but unknown. There she’s a renowned wine maker and her betrothed, Lem, is a musician of rare talent. Their destiny has never been in question. Whatever life brings, they will face it together. But destiny has a way of choosing its own path, and when a stranger crosses the wards into Vylari for the first time in centuries, the two are faced with a terrible prophecy. For beyond the borders, an ancient evil is returning, its age-old prison shattered.”

 

 

5. “Nottingham: The true story of robyn hood”

image via goodreads

Nottingham: The True Story of Robyn Hood is set for release this coming week. I’ll admit it: I’m a huge sucker when it comes to Robin Hood. I love the stories and the legends, and I want to eventually visit Sherwood Forest. This is definitely a book worth checking out, because Anna Burke creates a very interesting take on an old legend. The book’s Goodreads summary states,

“Robyn Hood didn’t set out to rob the rich, but in Nottingham, nothing ever goes according to plan…. After a fateful hunting accident sends her on the run from the law, Robyn finds herself deep in the heart of Sherwood Forest. All she really wants to do is provide for her family and stay out of trouble, but when the Sheriff of Nottingham levies the largest tax in the history of England, she’s forced to take matters into her own hands. Relying on the help of her band of merry women and the Sheriff’s intriguing—and off limits—daughter, Marian, Robyn must find a way to pull off the biggest heist Sherwood has ever seen.”

Featured image via Amazon

 


Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please join our Patreon to support our writers and creators or donate to our Paypal and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.
Become a Patron!




5 Poems About Cats To Get You Ready For the Film/Uncanny Valley Nightmare “Cats”

A list of poems about cats to get you ready for the book-of-poems-turned-musical-turned-nightmarish-film called Cats? Oh yes.

For those not in the loop, the musical Cats was originally inspired by a short book of cat poems written by T.S. Eliot. Did actors and actresses walk around the stage wearing cat costumes? Yes. Has the musical become both a theatrical classic and a joke? You bet.

And now, with the film premiering in the United States in but a few days, should we be ready for an uncanny valley nightmare? Yes.

Am I still going to go watch it?

…Yeah. Yeah, I am.

And am I going to use this film’s premiere as an excuse to share five poems about cats?

Oh yeah.

Here are five poems about cats for your reading consumption.

1. “The Cat and The Moon” by W.B. Yeats

image via teepublic

The cat went here and there
And the moon spun round like a top,
And the nearest kin of the moon,
The creeping cat, looked up.
Black Minnaloushe stared at the moon,
For, wander and wail as he would,
The pure cold light in the sky
Troubled his animal blood.
Minnaloushe runs in the grass
Lifting his delicate feet.
Do you dance, Minnaloushe, do you dance?
When two close kindred meet,
What better than call a dance?
Maybe the moon may learn,
Tired of that courtly fashion,
A new dance turn. [read more]

2. “February” by Margaret Atwood

image via animalwised
Winter. Time to eat fat
and watch hockey. In the pewter mornings, the cat,
a black fur sausage with yellow
Houdini eyes, jumps up on the bed and tries
to get onto my head. It’s his
way of telling whether or not I’m dead.
If I’m not, he wants to be scratched; if I am
He’ll think of something. He settles
on my chest, breathing his breath
of burped-up meat and musty sofas,
purring like a washboard. Some other tomcat,
not yet a capon, has been spraying our front door,
declaring war. It’s all about sex and territory,
which are what will finish us off
in the long run. Some cat owners around here
should snip a few testicles. If we wise
hominids were sensible, we’d do that too,
or eat our young, like sharks. [read more]

3. “Les chats” or “cats” by Charles Baudelaire (translation by william aggeler)

image via bookriot

Both ardent lovers and austere scholars
Love in their mature years
The strong and gentle cats, pride of the house,
Who like them are sedentary and sensitive to cold.

Friends of learning and sensual pleasure,
They seek the silence and the horror of darkness;
Erebus would have used them as his gloomy steeds:
If their pride could let them stoop to bondage. [read more]

4. “The cats will know” by cesare Pavese (translation by geoffrey brock)

image via pinterest
Rain will fall again
on your smooth pavement,
a light rain like
a breath or a step.
The breeze and the dawn
will flourish again
when you return,
as if beneath your step.
Between flowers and sills
the cats will know.
There will be other days,
there will be other voices.
You will smile alone.
The cats will know.
You will hear words
old and spent and useless
like costumes left over
from yesterday’s parties. [read more]

5. “The Naming of Cats” by t.s. Eliot

image via Brain pickings
The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter,
     It isn’t just one of your holiday games;
You may think at first I’m as mad as a hatter
When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES.
First of all, there’s the name that the family use daily,
     Such as Peter, Augustus, Alonzo, or James,
Such as Victor or Jonathan, George or Bill Bailey—
     All of them sensible everyday names.
There are fancier names if you think they sound sweeter,
     Some for the gentlemen, some for the dames:
Such as Plato, Admetus, Electra, Demeter—
     But all of them sensible everyday names,
But I tell you, a cat needs a name that’s particular,
     A name that’s peculiar, and more dignified,
Else how can he keep up his tail perpendicular,
     Or spread out his whiskers, or cherish his pride?
Of names of this kind, I can give you a quorum,
     Such as Munkustrap, Quaxo, or Coricopat,
Such as Bombalurina, or else Jellylorum—
     Names that never belong to more than one cat.
But above and beyond there’s still one name left over,
     And that is the name that you never will guess;
The name that no human research can discover—
     But THE CAT HIMSELF KNOWS, and will never confess.
When you notice a cat in profound meditation,
     The reason, I tell you, is always the same:
His mind is engaged in a rapt contemplation
     Of the thought, of the thought, of the thought of his name:
          His ineffable effable
          Effanineffable
Deep and inscrutable singular name.
Cover image via Collider

Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please join our Patreon to support our writers and creators or donate to our Paypal and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.
Become a Patron!




 
Four books stacked on top of each other (left side) beside an open book

Laugh out Loud with These 5 Insane Places to Read!

You can read anywhere. You can read in your house, on the bus, in a train, on a plane, you can read with the sunset behind you or with a sword fight in front of you.

 

Two people staring at each other through their respective books

Image Via NPR

 

But, using high tech sciencey things, we now know for sure, beyond any reasonable doubt, that these are the top five definite worst places to read.

 

5-In a burning building

 

Firefighters trying to put out a burning building

Image Via Practical Eschatology

 

The building is on fire. Well, time for a good book!

Don’t be that dude. The flames will destroy the pages and it’ll be too hot to properly read. You’ll get light headed. You will burn alive.

 

A book burning

Image Via The Guardian

 

And worst case, the book will burn into ash, and books shouldn’t be burned.

 

4-On Train Tracks

 

Don’t do this.

 

A POV shot of someone lying on traintracks

Image Via Time Magazine

 

There are two problems with this. For one, if you sit down normally then you could be sitting in a dark tunnel. Not good if you want to see what you’re reading without the assistance of a flashlight.

 

The subway arrives

Image Via Aliexpress

 

But let’s say the tunnel is lit up, like the picture above, or you’re outside, like the picture above that. Well, either way you’re sitting down on a terrain meant for a train that wasn’t meant for you to sit on. Sounds like your bum could be in a lot of pain. And if you lie down, that could hurt your spin. Not good.

ALSO A TRAIN COULD SMASH INTO YOUR FACE!

Picture this: You’re reading a good book. Completely engrossed. Eyes on the book, you don’t see that light coming for you at the end of the tunnel. But you hear it. You try to stand up, but you fall. It’s not so bad, you think, that could be something good. But here’s the thing…

 

Ben Affleck as Daredevil
Image Via Decider

“THAT’S NOT HEAVEN, THAT’S THE C TRAIN!”

And now instead of reading, you got hit by a train. Now that just sounds like a pain in the neck…

 

 

3-In the ocean

 

A person swimming (drowning?) in the ocean
Image Via Video Blocks

 

You’re underwater with a good book. Pacific ocean, let’s say? Yes, let’s say that.

The ocean is sparkling, glittering. Above you, colorful fish swim around you, dancing about like angels. You look down, but guess what? You can’t read. The water has washed the pages and smeared the ink.

 

Someone reaching above the surface of the water, straining to reach an unseen helping hand

Image Via Tony Evans

 

Now you have nothing to read while you drown. Life sucks sometimes, don’t it?

 

2-Space

 

Space

Image Via Wired

 

This seems romantic. Hurdling through the cosmos, a book in your hands, flying with the cosmos to the stars beyond the stars. Your eyes go to that first line and-

 

Even Starload nearly died in space...and he's half Celestial

Image Via Guardians of the Galaxy

 

You’re dead now. Wanna know why? Because you can’t breathe in space.

 

 

1-Skydiving

 

Skydiving

Image Via Skydive Mossel Bay

 

So you have your favorite book with you, but then a strange man in a red costume tells you to get ready. You put your trust bookmark in (don’t dogtail the page, you monster) and you put it at your side. There’s a parachute on your back. The plane opens up. You’re about to go skydiving.

With the wind whipping your face, you look below and see the ground. It looks like a painting. You take a breath and fall.

 

Skydiving

This is you, but you have a book in your hand  / Image Via Skydive Oz

 

As you tumble to the ground, you realize this might not ever happen again. You could die. Your blood is drumming through your veins. Your heart is going fast. With adrenaline pumping through you, you could just speed through the lines. When are you going to get another opportunity like this?

You open up your book and start to read. You’re reading fast, so fast, and you read both pages at breakneck speed. You flip the page, but you’re fighting against the wind. This is going to be harder than you think.

With all your might, you flip the page and readjust your hand, but the wind is too much. Not only is the wind literally shredding pages out of the book, but it feels like it could tear the skin off your hand.

The book flies out of your hand. That book cost a lot of money and you need to finish it before you give it back to mother earth. You look to where it’s gone, and you maneuver your body after it.

 

Skydiving

Image Via Fatherly

 

The light is harsh against your eyes. You squint, reaching out. But, Ghosh, what is that light? It’s yellow and it’s orange and it’s-!

 

A burning building, with leaping flames and billowing clouds of smoke.

Image Via Dissolve

 

A burning building. You can manage this. Reaching down, you grab the book. Yes, you have the book, and you will make this work. See that burning building? What a perfect place to read, you think, having not read this list.

 

Parachuting
Image Via BBC

You pull the parachute and gently glide into the burning building. But guess what?

 

A book burning

Image Via The Guardian

 

The book will burn into ash, and books shouldn’t be burned.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via INC


Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please join our Patreon to support our writers and creators or donate to our Paypal and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.
Become a Patron!