Tag: Quotes

New Year Drinks

Quotes to Help You Kick Off 2019 With a Bang

The new year has begun and it’s time to take advantage of another fresh start. Hopefully these quotes will help you look ahead to new experiences and memories to come!

 

 

“Whatever it is you’re scared of doing, Do it. Make your mistakes, next year and forever.” -Neil Gaiman

 


 

“Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come, whispering ‘it will be happier.'” -Alfred Tennyson

 


 

“My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive.” -Maya Angelou

 


 

“There are still many causes worth sacrificing for, so much history yet to be made.” -Michelle Obama

 


 

“Let us make our future now, and let us make our dreams tomorrow’s reality.” -Malala Yousafzai

 


 

“Nothing is impossible. The word itself says ‘I’m possible!’” -Audrey Hepburn

 


 

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” -C.S. Lewis

 


 

“We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us.” -Joseph Campbell

 


 

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.” -Albert Einstein

 


 

“You know, my motto is ‘Excelsior.’ That’s an old word that means ‘upward and onward to greater glory.'” -Stan Lee

 

 

 

Featured Image via Sedona Verde Valley

9 Literary Quotes That Will Get You Laid

Flirting is tough. Depending on who you are as a person, rejection can be painful, or tedious, as you say to yourself, “Why did I say that?” Well, I’m here to tell you, having a background in literature can work in your favor, whether you find yourself in a bar, lounge, or a literary party filled with undergraduates, awkwardly clutching their red plastic cups.

 

Image Via Favim.com

 

Here are some quotes you can use to find love or get laid, but don’t blame me if they don’t work out!

 

1. Bright Star by John Keats

 

Image Via Amazon

 

It’s impossible to resist this enchanting Keats line…

“Pillowed upon my fair love’s ripening

breast,

To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,

Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,

Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, and so live ever — or else swoon in death.”

 

2. Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair by Pablo Neruda

 

Image Via Amazon

 

You can pick out any line from Neruda’s poetry, and your phone will be flooding with numbers throughout the night, but here’s something you can start with:

“I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees.”

 

3. Just Kids by Patti Smith

 

Image Via Amazon

 

This is kind of risky, but at the same time it is a cute way to be closer to someone, well, if it works I mean, at least it worked for Robert, so I say shoot your shot:

“Will you pretend you’re my boyfriend?”

 

4. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Knowledge of Shakespeare is always a turn on, so I say be confident about it:

“Doubt thou the stars are fire; Doubt that the sun doth move; Doubt truth to be a liar; But never doubt I love.”

 

5. Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe

 

Image Via Amazon

 

If you feel like you want to get creative and challenge yourself by making a Poe quotation sexy then go live your best life:

“We loved with a love that was more than love.”

 

6. Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Get this deep with someone:

“Is love this misguided need to have you beside me most of the time? Is love this safety I feel in our silences? Is it this belonging, this completeness?”

 

7. Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Want to get Wilde with somebody? Say no more:

“The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it.”

 

8. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Show off your Austen moves:

“To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.”

 

9. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Let them know you see potential and not here for the b******t.

“I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be.”

That is the end of the list! If none of these quotes work and, if all else fails, buy one of these books and pull out more quotes for the next attempt.

 

Good luck!

 

Featured Image Via zigzagphotography.co.uk
'The Fault in Our Stars' by John Green

The 6 Steps to NaNoWriMo Success, as Told by Your Favorite Authors

It’s time for National Novel Writing Month, a hellish and delightful month-long exercise for writers of all skill levels and prior experience. The goal of NaNoWriMo is to write 50,000 words of fiction by the end of November, creating a bit more every day (1,667 words, to be exact). The outcome of NaNoWriMo is often a mix of joy and incredible frustration. Here are six pieces of serious advice from famous classic and contemporary authors to help get you through every step of the NaNoWriMo process.

 

1. Let your favorite books inspire you.

 

Horror novels by Stephen King

Image Via sheknows.com

 

Superstar horror novelist Stephen King, author of hits like It and The Shining, considers the relationship between writing and reading to be quite serious: “if you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” In fact, reading does make you a better writer— not necessarily because it makes you ‘more educated.’ In fact, many famous novelists never earned a college degree. By understanding the things you like best in your favorite stories (a richly realized setting, efficient pacing, possibly dragons), you can seek to recreate those elements in your own work. It’s not plagiarism to love in-depth character development.

 

2. Research your topic.

 

Research

Image Via oregoncenterfornursing.org

 

Few authors ever write the proverbial ‘Great American Novel,’ but many believe that classic writer and humorist Mark Twain is one of these few. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn author advises: “get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please.” While you don’t need to, say, drop everything and move to London to write your WWII period piece, you should also know more about WWII than to say for sure it happened. Make sure you have insight into the small details of the places, times, and circumstances you address— even if you feel familiar with them already! Others may share your experiences but feel differently about them. You may also find that immersing yourself in the mood and tone of a topic can make your work more atmospheric. 

 

3. Ignore your self-doubt.

 

Ignoring self-doubt to write your novel

Image Via npr.org

 

Sylvia Plath, literary icon and author of The Bell Jar, cautions against the self-doubt that can spell the sad ending of a writer’s dreams: “everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.” No matter the scope of your project (sweeping epic fantasy) or the difficulty of the subject matter (devastating political crisis), there’s only one thing that determines whether your novel gets written. Spoiler alert! It’s you. Bonus: if you write with self-confidence, your novel will have a stronger and clearer narrative voice. Take control of your feelings and your work— they both belong to you.

 

4. Accept that you might need ‘warm-up’ time.

 

Writer writing

Image Via videoblocks.com

 

If J.K. Rowling, international celebrity author of the Harry Potter series, needs to warm up… don’t feel bad about needing the same thing! She writes:

 

 

“You have to resign yourself to the fact that you waste a lot of trees before you write anything you really like, and that’s just the way it is. It’s like learning an instrument, you’ve got to be prepared for hitting wrong notes occasionally, or quite a lot, ‘cause I wrote an awful lot before I wrote anything I was really happy with.”

 

First drafts are more than just mistakes to be rewritten— they’re actually a necessary part of the process. If you’re a new writer just starting out, every sentence you despise is just the next step towards a sentence that you love. The only way out of the self-hate spiral is through it!

 

5. Consider your words.

 

Notebook and other writing supplies

Image via independent.co.uk

 

So you’ve gotten to the most important part of writing your novel— writing it. Conveniently, this part is usually also the hardest. It’s a challenge to be objective about your own work, and while it’s easy to tell whether or not you’re meeting the word count, it can be substantially less easy to tell whether or not the words are what you hoped they would be. George Orwell, classic author of 1984 and Animal Farm, has a series of blunt but helpful questions:

 

A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 

1. What am I trying to say? 
2. What words will express it? 
3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 
4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect? 

And he will probably ask himself two more: 
1. Could I put it more shortly? 
2. Have I said anything that is avoidably ugly? 

 

6. Finish the story.

 

Writer with laptop and coffee

Image Via pixabay.com

 

While the Internet is full of awesome writers’ resources, too much of a good thing can turn into a thing that distracts the absolute !@#$ out of you. The purpose of something like a character sheet isn’t to help you end up with a filled-out character sheet. The point is to end up with a complete character… who then lives inside a complete story. As John Green, celebrity author of heart-wrenching novels Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, so eloquently puts it: “go spit in the face of our inevitable obsolescence and finish your @#$&ng novel.” You can find this wisdom and the rest of his NaNoWriMo pep talk here for advice, inspiration, and blatant common sense.

 

One last piece of blatant common sense: always save your drafts!

 

 

Featured Image Via bustle.com