Tag: quentin tarantino

Top Six Books Dealing With the Manson Murders

 

In 1969, four Manson Family members invaded the rented home of Sharon Tate and Roman Polanski in Los Angeles. Sharon Tate, who was pregnant, was murdered along with three friends and an 18 year old visitor.

The murders have gone down in history as one of the most infamous murders in America and the story isn’t fading away anytime soon, especially with Quentin Tarantino’s most recent film, Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, dealing directly with the subject.

These ‘Manson Family’ murders have been dealt with in various ways through television, movies, and of course, books. Thus, we have created a list of six books for those interested in learning more about the man and the myth.

 

 

Member of the Family

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6. ‘Member of the Family’ by Dianne Lake

Member of the Family by Dianne Lake is a memoir by one of Charles Manson’s ‘girls’, telling her story of life under him. At age 14, Dianne became part of the Manson cult and its youngest member. For two years, she endured manipulation, psychological control, and physical abuse under Manson’s dark sway.

From her perspective, Dianne describes the cult’s descent into madness before their forgone conclusion. With the help of authority figures, therapists, and the police, Dianne was rehabilitated and grew to live a normal life. Now with have her book which tells her side of the story, giving key insights into Manson’s madness and showcasing one of the darkest chapters of American history.

 

 

The Life and Times of Charles Manson

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5. ‘Manson: The life and Times of Charles manson’ by Jeff Guinn

Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson by Jeff Guinn is a definitive account of Charles Manson himself. The author puts Manson in the context of the sixties, showing how Manson adapted to the turbulent era, an era dominated by race riots, cultural revolutions, and the Vietnam War. The author traces Manson’s origins back to his childhood, utilizing interviews with Manson’s sister, cousin, friends, classmates, and his old cellmates to show how his personality developed overtime.

All this combines to create a portrait of the man known as one of America’s biggest monsters.

 

 

The Girls

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4. ‘The Girls’ by Emma Cline

The Girls by Emma Cline is a work of fiction but invaluable part of the Charles Manson myth nonetheless. The story tells of a familiar idea: where in Northern California, a girl called Evie Boyd is drawn into a group that showcases idea of freedom, disrespect for authority, and reckless abandonment of society. She becomes a thrall to a soon-to-be infamous cult, led by an enigmatic cult leader. Each day, Evie spirals further into darkness and further towards a path that leads to violence.

This is a great coming-of-age tale that explores the conditions that lead to the Manson Family to thrive and how that intertwines with the ideology of a teenage girl.

 

 

The Family

Image via Amazon

3. ‘The Family’ by Ed Sanders

The Family by Ed Sanders was originally published in 1971 and has become a classic of the true crime genre. Meticulously researched, Sanders interviews dozens of members of the cult, including Manson himself, providing a detailed look into their origins, ideology, and motives. While some information in this book is rife with potential misinformation, given that Sanders promotes ideas of urban myths and some ugly victim blaming, the bulk of the information is not only credible but also incredible.

 

 

Chaos, Charles Manson, the CIA , and the Secret History of the Sixties

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2. ‘Charles Manson, the Cia, and the Secret History of the sixties’ by Tom o’neil

This book by Tom O’Nei is less a straight account of the Manson murders than a fascinating, dizzying, at times frustrating array of all of the alternative theories surrounding the case, from the suggestion that the murders may have been the result of a drug deal gone sour to the theory that Manson was a participant in CIA-sponsored LSD mind control experiments. While such theories are by no means proven, and vary wildly in terms of their believability, O’Neill does an excellent job at poking holes in the Helter Skelter narrative (not to mention the reliability of Bugliosi, who died in 2015) and forcing readers to reassess what had already been viewed as the definitive take on the case.

 

 

Helter Skelter

image via AMazon

1. ‘Helter Skelter’ by Vincent Bugliosi 

Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi was published in 1974 and is considered the definitive account of the Manson Murders. The chief prosecutor of the case, Bugliosi takes the readers through the twisted journey of his detective work surrounding the trial of Manson and his cult.

Although far from an unbiased source, Helter Skelter remains to this day a fundamental resource for anyone interested in the case.

 

 

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Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’ Might Premiere At Cannes!

There are a lot of big movies that are premiering at Cannes this year, and it looks like another big one might be coming.

 

Though things aren’t official yet, Variety is reporting that Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time In Hollywood might not premiere at the festival this year due to the fact that the film is still in post-production and will not be ready in time for the festival. If it comes down to this, Sony has a backup film: Greta Gerwig’s Little Women.

 

The director of Lady Bird is directing the latest adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s timeless classic about the four March sisters growing up in Massachusetts. Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh, Eliza Scanlen and Emma Watson play the four sisters. Laura Dern plays their mother, Meryl Streep plays their aunt and Timothée Chalamet plays Amy’s husband Theodore. The film is scheduled for release this Christmas.

 

Image Via Scary Mommy

 

It would be a surprising turn of events to see Little Women at Cannes this year. Do you hope to see it instead of Quentin Tarantino?

 

 

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