Tag: pride

Drop Everything, It’s Gryffindor Pride Day and Here Are The Tweets to Prove it

Hey! Gryffindor enthusiast here. I know what you’re thinking: “but are you actually a Gryffindor?” Yes. No, I did not take every sorting hat quiz available on the internet multiple times until I got Gryffindor. Yes, I took the *official* Pottermore quiz, and yes, I got Gryffindor the first time. Settled.

It’s no secret that all Hogwarts Houses have dedicated members with the pride of their loyalties running deep through their veins. Every house has a day to shine, and it’s time for Gryffindors near and far to unite and celebrate. Clearly, I have a lot of love for my house. But trust me, I’m not the only one. Check out these tweets by members of Gryffindor House expressing their pride.

 

Image via MinaLima

Sing your praises!

 

Gotta love some good lyric changes!

 

 

ALL THE FEELS… 

 

Every time.

make that social distance fun! (and productive of course)

 

Who said you can’t boast your Gryffindor pride while social distancing?

 

 

Loud and Proud!

 

And we love you for it!

 

 

love from ravenclaw 

 

We will throw this love right back to you on your special day!

 

 

quarantine but make it comfy 

 

Yes.

 

Image via Screen Rant

 

 

Featured Image via unsplash

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LGBTQ Books Are Being Censored and Authors Are Fighting Back

According to Entertainment Weekly Middle Schools across the country are resisting teaching LGBTQ material in the classroom. One incident occurred with an author called Jen-Petro Roy, who had booked a trip to Texas in order to talk with students about her book, P.S. I Miss You.

 

P.S. I Miss You

Image Via Goodreads

 

The novel follows an eleven year old girl who begins questioning her faith and sexuality, discovering she may not be straight and what that means for her identity. But, out of the blue, the school cancelled the scheduled visit.

According to Roy, the school had decided that by featuring her work, they’d be promoting an LGBT ‘agenda’ and she didn’t end up going to Texas after all. This is only the latest in a long string of controversies in children’s literature. Despite children’s books pushing forward with progressive attitudes, many LGBTQ voices are being silenced.

 

Image via Entertainment Weekly

Authors all over the country have noted they are suffering from being banned from even discuss LGBTQ material and many feel like they’re being gaslit. Schools often give excuses for teachers writing this material to not appear, making excuses that include scheduling conflicts or students study time. She describes this practice as ‘soft censorship’ and notes its really quite troubling, essentially enacting a ban on what literature young people are exposed to. She discovered parents had become upset at her for featuring pride flags on social media and they complained to the school, which likely helped make the decision.

 

Renegades

Image Via Amazon

 

The author further noted that bans might get more attention for the schools, making it extra motivation to allow them to get media attention they wouldn’t otherwise receive. Anonymous employees for schools revealed they had pulled books they did not ‘line up’ with school values, with nearly one third being tossed out or banned. For example: Renegades was banned because the main character has two dads.

The authors noted that kids are suffering the most for this and that this banning of content will ultimately hurt kids in the future. What do you think of these schools and their policies? Tell us in the comments.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Barnes And Noble 

New Teen Book Is Guide To Taking The First Steps To Be Gay And Proud

Every young person needs some advice sometimes, especially if you’re dealing with your own sexual identity and don’t know where to turn for help. Luckily, that’s where a new book by Riyadh Khalaf is here to help with that. According to Washington Blade the book is entitled Yay! You’re Gay! Now What? 

 

Yay! You're gay! Now what?

Image via Blade

In it, Riyadh offers advice to teens who admit they’ve been feeling ‘different’ than other kids. The author was quoted as saying he wants to realize young people can see that being gay is actually a “gift” and hopes this book will serve as a handy guide for helping them through a difficult part of their life.

 

 

The book intends to recognize the anxiety that comes with knowing you’re gay before changing that train of thinking early. In addition, the book emphasizes how to pursue a healthy gay relationship: recognize who you are but also recognize that consent is important and if you’re online, don’t let strangers make you do anything you find uncomfortable. As a result, some contents of the book deal openly with sexual situations and can be graphic for some, but never gratuitously so since the point is always to educate.

Lighthearted and easily accessible, the book is a fun, hilarious read filled with stories of gay men all around the world. Anyone who needs some help along the way will, upon reading this book, will not only is being gay a-okay but, more importantly, they are not alone.

 

Image via Amazon

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon