Tag: Plays

Eight Spicy Hamlet Memes

Alright, so you know we’re obsessed with SparkNotes’ twitter. Or, I am at least.  The memes are so dank. And now there’s a master list of everything they’ve posted about Hamlet, or at least a lot of it, and it’s all iconic. Here we go.

 

When Your Dad Tells You to Do Something

 

Clean my room? Murder your killer? Totally, I’ll do that right now. Just let me finish this chapter. Level. Book. I’ll TOTALLY remember the stabbing stuff after that. I’ll even clean up the blood. When I get to it. No one’s perfect, you know?

 

 

When You’re Totally Not Jealous

 

Hamlet might have been the first emo. Maybe. Certainly he was pretty early. Like, I get it man, intellectual and philosophical despair or whatever, your stepdad SUCKS, but maybe go outside. Get some sun. Maybe some soft serve. Commit a murder. Whatever works?

 

 

The Roulette Wheel of Murder Excuses

 

No, I totally didn’t kill my brother, it was, um… *turns around and furiously spins visible wheel* … a snake! Yeah. It was a snake. You know how it is. So many venomous snakes here in Denmark, it was bound to happen sometime. Totally innocent.

 

 

Ignoring the Obvious

 

Look. Your father died in a mysterious snake accident. Your uncle MARRIED YOUR MOM. That’s a yikes in any context, but it’s a super yikes here. Go and get all philosophical about it if you must, but Claudius is barely even trying to hide his misdeeds. Get to the decision, man.

 

 

Did You Ever Feel Like a Vine Could See You?

 

Look, Claudius, if you’re going to pull off a murderous coup, you’ve gotta have just like, a little tiny bit of chill. I’m not asking for a lot. This is like a vampire freaking out and running from the room every time you mention the sun. If you’re going to murder your brother, at least own it.

 

 

When the Paper is Due Tomorrow

 

Maybe just do to him whatever you did to Ophelia. Too soon? #opheliadeservedbetter Seriously though, you live with the guy. Literally just stand there and kill him when he STOPS praying. Kill him in his sleep. Do something. Honestly, Lettie, kill or do not kill, there is no try.

 

 

Absolutely No One

 

Formally. Informally. Hamlet had the emotions of a Romantic, about a hundred years too early. I feel like the romantics would have really Gotten him. (Or like, four hundred years before his time. Imagine Hamlet with a floppy fringe. I digress). Either way, he’s an emotional mess, but mostly valid. #opheliadeseRVEDBETTER

 

 

All images via Spark Notes

 

Six Iconic Shakespeare Memes

Shakespeare’s plays are whackier and whackier the more you read. Confusion, dirty jokes, and some pretty unbelievable things happening at sea. So many things are just begging to be memed. It’s a shame memes weren’t even invented until four hundred years after his death. At least we can give his works the meming they deserve retroactively.

Image via Pintrest

 

What an icon. Shakespeare invented countless words, including the word countless. But let’s get to plot nonsense.

I confess, my love of hamlet shows a little here, but who can blame me? There’s a reason it’s so widely read. Plus, Hamlet himself is such an incredibly quotable character, who wouldn’t make a meme? Like his most famous line.

Image via Dorkly

 

But it’s not just the things he says when he’s alone and feeling emo. Hamlet comes face to face with almost everyone in the play, in a way that changes it around him, even when he’s not staging mini murder plays.

Image via Citizen Sociolinguistics

 

I think we can all agree Ophelia deserved better. Who does he think he is, a prince? He-hem. Usually tossing a girl around a room (in some adaptations) is not the way to her heart. But you know what’s actually a worse seduction tactic?

Image via Dorkly

 

Yikes. That’s one way to get her alone. Not one I can condone, though. Alright, enough about Denmark. We could go on like this forever.

Let’s talk about history. No, it’s not the picture of an impaled bottle of Caesar salad dressing, as iconic as that is. It’s not the only Julius Caesar meme.

Image via SparkNotes

 

What happens when you kill the one fun friend? Then again, I guess all getting together to stab someone could be considered a party of sorts. It’s certainly one way to bond with your coworkers. Work outing? Tried it and I CANNOT recommend.

Image via Pintrest

I had to include a Much Ado About Nothing meme, because it’s my all time fave, and this is my favorite adaptation. Plus, just about every character is an absolute meme, start to finish.

 

 

Featured image via Shakespeare Teacher

‘Killing an Evening With Edgar Allan Poe’ Returns to NY City

John Kevin Jones will be returning for the wonderfully titled Killing an Evening With Edgar Allan Poe.

 

Image Via SummonersEnsemble.com

 

Brought to you by the Summoners Ensemble Theatre, in association with the Merchant’s House Museum, this one-man show debuted last year with twenty-seven performances at the landmark 1832 Merchant’s House Museum.

 

John Kevin Jones

Image Via HollywoodSoapBox

 

John Kevin Jones will once again star. It’ll be tough to do this one-man play, even if he has done it twenty-seven times before, he’s a six-year veteran of A Christmas Carol at the Merchant’s House. He’s an expert at this.

 

Dr. Rhonda Dodd

Image Via directory.business.wsu.edu

 

Plus he’ll be joined by the director of A Christmas Carol at the Merchant’s House, Dr. Rhonda Dodd, who will direct this project as well.

 

 

Now that we know we are safe hands, we sit back and let ourselves get swept up in the horror.

 

Exterior-Merchant House Museum

Image Via BrownStoner

 

Like I said before, the play will be performed at the Merchant’s House Museum. This is splendid news and delightfully apropos, given that the Merchant’s House Museum, also known as the Old Merchant’s House as well as the Seabury Tredwell House, is Manhattan’s only 19th century family home to be preserved intact.

 

Edgar A Poe

Image Via Britannica

 

Edgar Allan Poe himself was a nineteenth century writer and literary critic. Born January 19, 1809 and died under strange circumstances in October 7, 1849, Poe became known after his death as the master of horror, mystery, and the macabre, and a pioneer of the short story.

 

Interior-Merchant House Museum

Image Via Timedout

 

The Merchant’s House Museum was formerly the home to the Tredwell’s, a prosperous merchant-class family. Given that the Tredwell’s are now long dead, it’ll only add to the creepiness of the show given that their once lively candlelit parlor will be set for a funeral, complete with coffin and draped mirrors.

Fitting, given that the show features live performances of Poe’s most infamous stories from The Tell-Tale Heart, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Cask of Amontillado, and, of course, The Raven.

 

 

Broadway World warns that “[a] bone-chilling evening of irrational revenge, obsession, premeditated murder, dismemberment, and the very, very dark awaits”.

Buy tickets here, if you dare. The Merchant’s House Museum located at twenty-nine East, Fourth Street in Manhattan, NY. Performances will run September 24th until November 3rd. For more information, please visit www.summonersensemble.org and www.merchantshouse.org.

 

 

Featured Image Via Biography.com

Philip Pullman’s ‘La Belle Sauvage’ Gets Stage Adaptation!

Philip Pullman’s La Belle Sauvage is getting a stage adaptation!

 

La Belle Sauvage
Image Via Amazon
 

The first volume of planned trilogy entitled The Book of Dust to his previous trilogy His Dark Materials, an infamous trilogy made up of The Golden Compass (known as Northern Lights in its home country of the UK), The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass, La Belle Sauvage is a fantasy novel that is set twelve years before this trilogy.

Published in 2017  by David Fickling Books in the UK and by Alfred A. Knopf in the US, this first volume in a planned trilogy covers the story of the event leading up Lyra Belacqua’s arrival as a six-month-old baby at Jordan College, Oxford.

 

Philip Pullman
Image Via Irish Times
 

The book received positive reviews, with The Guardian noting that La Belle Sauvage recalled children’s classic like C.S Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia, Lucy M Boston’s Green Knowe, and the ancient Welsh tales of The Mabinogion, raving that “[o]ne other way in which La Belle Sauvage recalls those children’s classics is the sheer beauty of the book itself. David Fickling Books should be praised for the faith it’s shown in producing something both lavish and readable.”

The Washington Post said of the trilogy, “Too few things in our own world are worth a seventeen-year-wait: ‘The Book of Dust’ is one of them”.

 

HBO is making an adaptation of 'His Dark Materials' too!
Image Via Town & Country Magazine
 

Since The Golden Compass is getting an adaptation in the form of an HBO prequel show, it seems fitting that the prequel should also get an adaptation.

Before going on, let’s note that Pullman himself said the second volume in his new trilogy, the The Secret Commonwealth, is fast forward to roughly ten years after His Dark Materials ended and will follow Lyra as an adult. No dangling plot threads in this story!

That story is set to be published in October.

Back to the stage adaptation!

 

 

Given that Nicholas Wright’s stage adaptation of the His Dark Material triology was adapted into a two-part production that managed to nab  Timothy Dalton, Patricia Hodge, Ben Whishaw, and Dominic Cooper, this new adaptation should

Nicholas Hytner
Image Via The Telegraph
 

The stage adaptation is set for in autumn 2020 premiere at London’s Bridge theatre. The Guardian reports that Nicholas Hytner, whose had extensively work in the theatre stretching back to 1978, will direct the show.

 

Bryony Lavery
Image Via The Stage
 

The adaptation will be written by Bryony Lavery, who notably got a Tony Award nomination for Best Play for her 1998 play Frozen, which was about the disappearance of a ten-year-old girl.

 

Illustration from 'Le Belle Sauvage'
Image Via Medium
 

Hytner is no stranger to Pullman stage adaptation. Back in 2003, His Dark Materials was adapted into a two part production. Written by playwright Nicholas Wright, the original production, which premiered at the National Theatre in London in 2003, managed to nab stars such as Timothy Dalton, Patricia Hodge, Ben Whishaw and Dominic Cooper!

Who do you think they’ll get for this adaptation?

 

 

Featured Image Via The Verge 

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare’s Home Has Been Found

Want to know where William Shakespeare wrote Romeo and Juliet? Up until now you’ve been left in the dark, but thanks to theater historian Geoffrey Marsh the answer is finally clear.

 

William Shakespeare writing
IMAGE VIA BIOGRAPHY.COM

CNN broke the news how Mr. Marsh, the director of the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Department of Theatre and Performance, has spent a decade “meticulously researching the home of the English dramatist and poet by cross-referencing official records to pinpoint…” the home of this wondrous playwright.

So where did the quest to find this creator of words like ‘addiction’, ‘assassination’, ‘bedazzled’ and many others began?

In 2008 ‘The Theatre’, an Elizabethan playhouse in East London’s Shoreditch, was discovered. Infamously, this centerpiece of human visual art predated ‘The Globe’ as our good old Billy Shakes’ workplace. This got Mr. Marsh curious and, never a man to heed the old saying ‘curiosity killed the cat’ he went on a search through tales upon tales to find this mouse.

 

William Shakespeare

Image Via Time

The first key piece of evidence was the knowledge that the writer of classic literature lived in Central London near Liverpool Street Station. Where, exactly? Well, taxpayer recorders in 1597 and 1598 weren’t exactly clear on that.

Mr. Marsh wasn’t satisfied. A detective on the case, he got out his magnifying glass and looked at every word from that faded 1550s document. What did he fine in that near-indecipherable erratic spelling?

 

Historian Geoffrey Marsh analyzed archives that dated back to the 1550s.
IMAGE VIA CNN

Well, “[a]ccording to Marsh, evidence suggests Shakespeare had lived in a property overlooking the churchyard of St. Helens as a tenant of the Company of Leathersellers, a guild that organized the Elizabethan leather trade.”

 

William Shakespeare's home
IMAGE VIA WHNT NEWS

So that’s where Shakespeare wrote his classic love story about star-crossed young lovers. Why is it important? Well…

“The place where Shakespeare lived in London gives us a more profound understanding of the inspirations for his work and life.”

Featured Image Via Famous Biographies