Tag: Patron Saints of Nothing

National Book Award Finalists For Young People’s Literature

The National Book Foundation has unveiled the finalists for the National Book Awards. Listing five books each in five categories, they’ve given us some recognizable names, but it’s going to be an interesting year considering that none of the authors have taken home a National Book Award in these categories before.

For this article, we’re going to show you what made it into the ‘Young People’s Literature’ category.

 

 

Pet by Akwaeke Emezi

 

Pet by [Emezi, Akwaeke]

Image Via Amazon

 

This book follows Jam and her best friend, Redemption, as they learn that monsters exist and suddenly meet Pat, a creature made of horns and colors and claws that emerges from one of Jam’s mother’s paintings thanks to a drop of Jam’s blood.

Now Jam must fight not only to protect her best friend, but it’ll be tough given that no one in this world believes in monsters.

How does one navigate in a world that is in denial about what you yourself know to be the truth?

Acclaimed novelist Akwaeke Emezi asks this all important question, and many more, in their timely young adult debut. Kirkus Reviews praised this addition to YA as a “…soaring novel shoots for the stars and explodes the sky with its bold brilliance.”

 

Look Both Ways: A tale told in ten blocks by Jason Reynolds

 

Look Both Ways: A Tale Told in Ten Blocks by [Reynolds, Jason]

Image Via Amazon

 

As Kirkus Reviews notes, this is a “collection [that] brims with humor, pathos, and the heroic struggle to grow up.” The overarching story is that a school bus fell from the sky, but no one saw it happen. Going through the day-to-day life of ten children all on a different block, we discover what really happens after the last school bell rings and what goes through our minds as we walk from home and, more importantly, what we ignore.

 

 

Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All by Laura Ruby

 

Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All by [Ruby, Laura]

Image Via Amazon

 

Here we follow the story of Frankie, who’s been an orphan ever since her mother died and her father left her and her siblings in an orphanage. Now Frankie and her sister, Toni, two young, unwanted women doing everything they can to survive.

But now the embers of the Great Depression are kindled into the fires of World War II, and with the shadows of injustice, poverty, and death all around, the odds are against Frankie to make it in his doggone world.

NPR notes that “[t]here may be wolves behind all the doors, but there is also a whole world beyond for those bold enough to push them wide.”

 

1919: The Year That Changed America by Martin W. Sandler

1919

IMAGE VIA Amazon

 

In 1919 (obviously) America was recovering from World War I, black soldiers returned to racism so violent that that summer would become known as the Red Summer, the suffrage movement had a long-fought win when women gained the right to vote, laborers turned to the streets to protest working conditions, and a national fervor led to a communism scare. It was the year that prohibition went into effect.

A hundred years later, Sandler looks back at each of these movements, looking at their momentum and their setbacks, showing that progress isn’t always a straight line. More than a history book, Sandler has crafted an “entertaining and instructive look at a tumultuous year.”

 

PATRON SAINTS OF NOTHING BY RANDY RIBAY

Patron Saints of Nothing

IMAGE VIA GOODREADS

 

This high school English teacher and YA novelist has a breakout hit with this June 18th release. Critically acclaimed, this Filipino-American author gives his most personal story yet:

The novel explores Jay, whose cousin is killed as part of Duterte’s drug war, as he travels to the Philippines in an attempt to unravel the mystery of his cousin’s death, confronting a place he thought he knew.

Kirkus Reviews showers praise, ending their review by saying “[p]art coming-of-age story and part exposé of Duterte’s problematic policies, this powerful and courageous story offers readers a refreshingly emotional depiction of a young man of color with an earnest desire for the truth,” and I say that I’ve been following this ever since I included it on Top Picks all the way back in June 16th, and now it’s been nominated!

 

 

Who do you think is going to win? I know who I think is going to win…

 

 

Featured Image Via School Library Journal 

TOP PICKS: YA Novels You Need to Read

Each week, Bookstr will be giving a look at some of the best novels in a particular genre for your continued reading list.

Today, we’ll be recommending five newly released young adult novels that will excite, delight, and entice you into the world of young individuals learning what it means to grow up. Life doesn’t give you a manual, but it does give you a book!

 

5. All of us with Wings by michelle Ruiz keil

All Of Us With Wings

Image Via Michelleruizkeil.com

Latinx author and playwright, Michelle Ruiz Keil, has given us her first full length novel!

Described by Kirkus Reviews as a “tale of found family and recovery weaves an unforgettable punk rock–infused spell,” the story follows teenage runaway, Xochi, who meets up with Pallas, a precocious twelve-year-old. They befriend each other, but one night, accidentally summon a pair of ancient beings intent on avenging the wrongs of Xochi’s past. As the Amazon description describes, “…no one is safe—not the family Xochi’s chosen, nor the one she left behind.”

Arriving June 18, 2019, this magical story will engross you in 1980s San Francisco from beginning to end as you go through all the sex, drugs, rock and roll, and inner demons made real.

 

4. Call it what you want by BRIGID Kemmerer

Call It What You Want

Image Via Goodreads

Coming June 25th you’ll know for sure if this book is better than the Taylor Swift song!

Coming from New York Times bestselling author of novels like A Curse So Dark and Lonely, More Than We Can Telland Thicker Than Water, this veteran of the YA genre is coming out with a brand new story!

Here’s the skinny: A once popular lacrosse player, Rob, along with the rest of the town, discover that Rob’s father had embezzled funds from half the town. Once caught, Rob’s father tries to kill himself, fails. Rob, now a social outcast, must care for his father.

Then there’s Maegan. Maegan has a secret, and, when her sister comes home from college pregnant, things might not just blow over.

Guilty and depressed, Rob concocts a plan to fix the damage caused by his father, but just before it goes into motion he meets Maegan. They form a strong friendship, but strong friendships aren’t necessarily unbreakable…

Described by Kirkus Reviews as “[g]ripping, heartfelt, and layered,” the novel asks if it’s okay to do something wrong for the right reasons…

 

 

3. Like a love story by Abdi Nazemian

Like A Love Story

Image Via Harper Collins

Iranian American screenwriter, executive producer, and author, Abdi Nazemian has a new novel out!

At the height of the 1989 AIDS crisis, we have three teens who must grapple with love and friendship.

We have Reza, a young, gay immigrant whose only impression of gay lifestyle is from the media’s depiction of men dying of AIDS, Judy, an aspiring fashion designer and niece of a man who also has AIDS, and Arts, Judy’s openly gay best friend.

All three meet up, form a friendship, and Judy and Reza start dating, but Reza realizes he’s falling for Judy’s best friend….

Arriving June 4, 2019, this novel has been described by Kirkus Reviews as “[d]eeply moving” and I’m sure you’ll be moved by it too…

 

2. Better than the best plan by Lauren Morrill

Better Than The Best Plan

Image Via LaurenMorrill.com

Another veteran of YA novels, including Meant to Be, Lauren Morrill has her fifth YA novel coming out and you won’t want to put this one down! Here’s the story:

Seventeen-year-old Rizy’s summer plans go upside down when a social worker puts her back into foster care, after realizing Ritzy is living alone. It’s no problem, but all surprises, when Ritzy finds that her foster mother, Kristin, actually has a nice place. And the boy next door, he’s cute!

Maybe this won’t be all that bad, but when Ritzy’s old life catches up with her new one, she’ll have some tough decisions to make.

Kirkus Reviews notes that “Ritzy’s scrappy charm provide enough intrigue to keep readers turning the pages,” I’m sure you’ll want to go on this excitingly funny journey once it arrives June 25th!

 

1. Patron saints of Nothing by randy Ribay

Patron Saints of Nothing

Image Via Goodreads

This high school English teacher and YA novelist has a breakout hit with this June 18th release. Critically acclaimed, this Filipino-American author gives his most personal story yet:

The novel explores Jay, whose cousin is killed as part of Duterte’s drug war, as he travels to the Philippines in an attempt to unravel the mystery of his cousin’s death, confronting a place he thought he knew.

Kirkus Reviews showers praise, ending their review by saying “[p]art coming-of-age story and part exposé of Duterte’s problematic policies, this powerful and courageous story offers readers a refreshingly emotional depiction of a young man of color with an earnest desire for the truth.”

Will you join the conversation and pick up this novel?

 

Let us know what you think of our suggestions in the comments! Hopefully, you’ll add some of these to your ongoing reading list.

 

 

Featured Image Via Npr.org