Tag: online

You Can Stream ‘Harry Potter’ Right Now Absolutely Free

If you’re a fellow bookworm (which, duh, you are on Bookstr,) you probably already know that Audible has made a ton of children’s books free to stream for the duration of the pandemic. This is super helpful for the parents stuck at home with kids out of school, hungry to stay educated and entertained!

image via audible

Luckily for us, among the free titles are plenty of great YA novels for all ages, including Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by the incredible J.K. Rowling! Narrated by Stephen Fry and packed with delightful theme music by James Hannigan, this is truly a magical listening experience.

 

The stream lasts for a whopping nine hours and thirty-three minutes, with rave reviews from Audible customers… some are even claiming it to be better than the movie. This is absolutely sure to help you escape from the real world chaos to the wizarding fantasy land we’ve dreamed of since we were young, if only for a while!

featured image via techradar

Enjoying Bookstr? Get more by joining our email list!

Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please join our Patreon to support our writers and creators or donate to our Paypal and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.
Become a Patron!

Amid Pandemic, Libro.fm and Bookshop.org Sales Skyrocket

Amid the current coronavirus pandemic, many people have chosen to self-quarantine and practice social distancing in efforts to stop the spread. This leaves many with newfound free time on their hands and the challenge of finding ways to entertain themselves while quarantining at home. In this quest, many have turned to reading to fill their spare time and rather than go to a bookstore to acquire these books, they can be found entirely online. 

 

Audio-bookstore, Libro.fm, and online bookstore, Bookshop.org have both seen sales skyrocket, as a result of the recent coronavirus pandemic. Both online stores collaborate with independent booksellers and return a share of sales back to them. This is in an effort to keep independent bookstores alive, especially during this time of social distancing. CEO and co-founder of Libro.fm, Mark Pearson, notes that “it has been a record breaking month for sales and new memberships.” Compared to the previous month, Pearson notes that sales for the thirty day period, which ended on March 15, were up about 150%. 

 

image via grinnell college

 

Libro.fm, which is based in Seattle, had already noticed the hit to independent bookstores in their community. In a radical move, the company altered their business model “so that affiliate bookstores get all the revenue from new membership sales until the end of the month.” Pearson notes the importance of independent booksellers stating, “if independent bookstores go under, we don’t exist.” This important measure reminds people of the value of their own community. 

 

Similarly, Bookshop.org has seen a sudden increase in the amount of bookstores signing up as affiliates. Founder Andy Hunter says, “A lot of stores opened accounts recently as an emergency measure in case they need to close up shop.” Until then, they are able to fulfill the web orders from their own shops. Bookshop.org has also seen a giant increase in sales as the coronavirus pandemic has escalated. Over the last four days, the online shop has seen a 400% increase in sales as social distancing and self-quarantining have become a widespread practice. 

 

image via venngage

While companies like Libro.fm and Bookshop.org have solved a number of societal problems during this ambiguous and secluded time, that doesn’t mean they don’t feel pressure to meet customer demands. Developers feel the pressure to make site improvements faster, and without error. For now, Hunter says that, so long as our servers stay up – we’ve checked them, and they are good – we’ll be here for bookstores.” 

Stay safe and happy reading!

 

Featured Image via Fine Art America

Enjoying Bookstr? Get more by joining our email list!

Bookstr is community supported. If you enjoy Bookstr’s articles, quizzes, graphics and videos, please join our Patreon to support our writers and creators or donate to our Paypal and help Bookstr to keep supporting the book loving community.
Become a Patron!

 

Here’s Why China Is Delaying ‘Game of Thrones’ Finale

It seems Game of Thrones might be the latest to suffer as a result of the ongoing trade war. According to CNN, China’s video internet service which owns the rights to the show, shocked viewers when they delayed the release of the final episode due to “video transmission problems”. This was a huge blow to Chinese fans of the show, who vented their frustration and dismay over the episode’s sudden and unexpected delay online. Many fans suggested a possible connection between the ongoing trade war and the episode’s delay, and touting the possibility that streaming services were being targeted along with other products.

Several viewers responded to the delay by posting the infamous ‘shame’ GIF.

 

A nun-like figure walking through the streets ringing her bell and yelling 'Shame!'

Image Via Game of Thrones wiki

 

The timing is possibly parallel to the escalation of the trade war, with Donald Trump raising tariffs on Chinese goods, with China also raising its own tariffs on U.S. goods in turn. In addition, anti-US propaganda has escalated in China, leading to a lingering thread of hostility between the two countries. Chinese productions with US links, meanwhile, have been vanishing from various networks, getting cancellations without warning. Historical channels have also been airing propaganda films showcasing their countryman fending off American invaders. It’s possible Game of Thrones has become the latest victim of this due to intensifying relations.

What do you think of this situation? It’s a pity of all those Game of Thrones fans overseas who were deprived of the finale but it seems to be a symptom of a much larger problem.

 

 

Featured Image Via Deadline

Library

‘Johns Hopkins University’ Raising Out-Of-Print Books from the Dead

In 2016, John’s Hopkins University Press received a $938,000 grant courtesy of The Andrew Mellon Foundation, which allowed them the funds to continue building an Open Access (OA) platform for monographs in humanities and social sciences. 

 

This was all part of MUSE Open, a non-profit organization aimed at making scholarly texts, journals, articles, and more readily accessible. The organization was founded in 1995 and, in the past twenty-three years, has teamed up with nearly 300 publishers to make works from all categories available online.

 

MUSE Open

via Project MUSE

 

This is vital because people who otherwise would not have had the opportunity to read and learn from these texts have been given a platform to do exactly that.

 

In April, Johns Hopkins received another grant for $200,000 from both The Andrew Mellon Foundation and The National Endowment for the Humanities which will allow them to take over 200 out-of-print works and release them back into the world via MUSE.

 

Expanding their database to include texts that were previously out-of-print will give these books new life and allow them to be seen again for the first time in years.

 

Johns Hopkins has taken the lead on this, but maybe in the future we’ll see more out-of-print works raised from the dead, along with other Open Access platforms making texts accessible for all!

 

 

via GIPHY

 

Featured Image via Pixa Bay.