Tag: obituary

chuck kinder

Novelist and ‘Wonder Boys’ Inspiration Chuck Kinder Passes Away

LA Times reports that beloved novelist Chuck Kinder, who was also the inspiration for the central character in Michael Chabon’s Wonder Boys, has passed away.

Kinder was regarded as a literary force with a larger-than-life personality, and published many titles, including Snakehunter, The Silver Ghost, Honeymooners: A Cautionary Tale, Last Mountain Dancer: Hard-Earned Lessons in Love, Loss, and Honky-Tonk Outlaw Life, and last year’s Hot Jewels.

 

honeymooners

Image via Amazon

 

Honeymooners was Kinder’s most popular book, and tells the story of two bad-boy writers, who were inspired by real-life friend Raymond Carver, and himself.

He was also famous for mentoring Michael Chabon when the Pulitzer Prize-winning author was still an undergraduate student in the 1980s. The late author was believed to be the inspiration for the character Grady Tripp, the disheveled, pot-addicted writer and professor in Chabon’s Wonder Boys (The character was portrayed by Michael Douglas in the 2000 adaptation).

 

wonder boys

Image via Amazon

 

Kinder’s former student, novelist, and screenwriter, April Smith, praised her teacher, “[Kinder’s] work was and remains outstanding and fresh. He was a born storyteller with an instinct for myth, which was not exactly in favor compared to pared-down modernists like John Updike.”

 

chuck kinder

Image via LA Times

 

Another former student, Carl Kurlander, posted as well, reminiscing about Kinder’s warmth and creation of a safe space for fellow writers during his 40 years as a teacher:

 

“When I first came back to Pittsburgh for what I thought would be a one year Hollywood sabbatical, I met a great teacher/writer/human being named Chuck Kinder who embraced me so warmly, it was one of the reasons I felt like staying.”

 

After a number of health issues including two strokes, a heart attack, and triple-bypass surgery, Kinder retired as the director of University of Pittsburgh’s creative writing program in 2014, and settled in Key Largo, Florida, with his wife, Cecily.

Kinder was seventy-fix-years old. He will be remembered by admirers and all whose talents he helped foster.

 

Featured Image via Washington Post

W.S. Merwin standing in a well-foliaged area of Hawaii.

American Poet W.S. Merwin Has Died at 91

Your absence has gone through me
Like thread through a needle.
Everything I do is stitched with its color.

-W.S. Merwin, “Separation”

 

The world of poetry has lost one of its brightest and longest-burning lights this week. W.S. Merwin, a prolific American poet and environmental activist, has died at the age of 91 in Hai’ku, Hawaii. Those of you familiar with Merwin’s work understand the depth of loss that has occurred, and those of you who aren’t can consider this an opportunity to make the best of the situation and read through the repertoire of this exceedingly talented artist.

 

W.S. Merwin in his garden
Image via Thirteen.org

 

While we mourn his passing, no one can deny that the life Merwin lead took every advantage of the 91 years he spent on this planet. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927, just two years before the stock market crash that would set off the events of the Great Depression. The first indication of Merwin’s poetic leanings came when he was only five years old, assisting his father, a Presbyterian minister, by writing hymns. Merwin’s love of language was planted in him by his father’s ministry, specifically a reading of Chapter Six in the book of Isaiah. In an interview with Paul Holdengräber in 2017, he said:

 

I was so taken by the sound of the language that I had memorized it just by hearing it…. I thought, “I have to find more language like that because I really want that to be part of my life.”

 

Sadly, Merwin’s home life was not safe. The same father who exposed him to the love of language he would build his career on was also abusive, forcing the adolescent Merwin to act as protector on behalf of himself and his mother. These protective instincts may also be the trait that prompted his later work in conservancy.

 

A young W.S. Merwin
Image via Academy of Achievement

 

Merwin graduated from Princeton University in 1948, and spent his post-grad years as many Americans with the means chose to do: traveling across Europe. It is believed that the landscape of his home in the Midi Pyrenees region of France had a major influence on his work.

 

Merwin’s first-ever collection of poetry, A Mask for Januspublished in 1952, caught the attention of W.H. Auden— this should instill some hope in those with writing aspirations. This first volume of work drew upon classical literature, but Merwin’s successive volumes would become more experimental over time, eventually evolving into the “impersonal, indirect, and open style that eschewed punctuation” that he became known for.

 

Merwin relocated to Hai’ku Hawaii, (and I must say, Hai’ku sounds like a brilliant choice of residence for a poet) in 1976, at the age of 49, where he purchased a plot of land with the intention of restoring it to health after having been ravaged by exploitative farming practices. Merwin accomplished this goal, and it became one of the crowning achievements of his life outside of writing. Merwin was a staunch anti-war and environmental activist, attitudes that come across very strongly in his work. Merwin’s worldview may best be explained by his subscription to the philosophy of deep ecology, which aims to de-center humanity’s role on earth, i.e., humans are not the best thing since sliced bread, we are just one form of life that emerged from a vast primordial pool that spawned an unknowable amount of creatures currently populating the planet. In his lifetime, Merwin and his wife Paula (née Dunaway, a children’s books editor who passed in 2017) founded a non-profit called The Merwin Conservancy, to which the revitalized Hai’ku property will now be donated.

 

W.S. and Paula Merwin
W.S. and Paula Merwin | Image via The Merwin Conservancy

 

W.S Merwin’s work is hosted online by The Poetry Foundation, and can be read by anyone, for free, here. The Merwin Conservancy accepts donations, and you may find the link to do so here.

 

Featured image via PBS

The Literary Loves of Karl Lagerfeld: Fashion’s Greatest Book Lover

Karl Lagerfeld, creative director of Chanel and one of fashion’s most prominent and recognizable visionaries has passed away aged eighty-five. The native of Hamburg, Germany, affectionately known as The Kaiser in fashion circles, had missed the Chanel haute couture show in Paris last month, sparking speculation about his condition. According to Closer, on Monday night Lagerfeld was admitted to hospital in Paris, however his cause of death has not yet been released.

Image Via Usmagazine

Lagerfeld started out in 1955, as assistant to Pierre Balmain, before joining Chanel in 1983, where he spent thirty-six years. In addition to these roles, he also held long-term design positions at Fendi, Chloé, and established his own Karl Lagerfeld label. However, not only was Lagerfeld a revolutionary designer and fashion icon, the renowned polyglot was also a great lover of books.

In September of 2005, Lagerfeld gave an interview to Vanity Fair, in which he revealed his favorite writers in his many tongues, saying “I like poets best, E. Dickinson (English), R. M. Rilke (German), Mallarmé (French), Leopardi (Italian). I speak no other languages and I don’t believe in translated poetry,” as well as his fictional hero, Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. In 2008, he spoke to Women’s Wear Daily, saying “I hate leisure, except reading.”

Image Via Vogue

In addition to this, in September 2017, French Vogue ran an article simply titled ‘Karl Lagerfeld’s Favorite Books’ in which he listed works by the likes of Neitzche, for who’s entire works Lagerfeld was an editor in Germany, Spinoza (“the person who wrote the phrase that I live by: ‘Any decision is a refusal'”), Didion, Homer, and Borges among many others. In this piece, he also noted that he ‘wrote literary reviews for Vogue at the start of the 1970s, using Minouflet de Vermenou as [his] pen name.’

Lagerfeld had a personal collection of over 300,000 books. At the 2015 International Festival of Fashion and Photography, Lagerfeld explained “Today, I only collect books; there is no room left for something else. If you go to my house, I’ll have you walk around the books. I ended up with a library of 300,000. It’s a lot for an individual.”

In addition to this, Lagerfeld’s name appears on a number of books, including The Karl Lagerfeld Diet, The Glory of Water: Daguerreotypes, and Casa Malaparte among others.

Lagerfeld has been commemorated on social media by his many A-List friends and supporters, including Kim Kardashian, Kaia Gerber, Florence Welch and Editor-in-Chief of Manhattan Magazine Phebe Wahl whose post read ‘It was King Karl’s world, we were all lucky enough to enjoy it for a bit.’

 

Featured Image Via Katie Considers

 

 

Raccoon Who Inspired Rocket in ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Passes Away

Mr. Oreo, the raccoon who was the inspiration for the character of Rocket in Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy has passed away aged ten, after a short illness.

 

Mr. Oreo assisted animators in capturing racoon behaviour and movements to create the character of Rocket, who was voiced by Bradley Cooper. Rocket made his first appearance in 2014’s Guardians of the Galaxy, and featured in the 2017 sequel, as well as in 2018’s Avengers: Infinity War. He will also appear in the upcoming Avengers: Endgame, which we can only hope will be dedicated to Mr. Oreo.

 

Image Via MovieWeb

When Guardians of the Galaxy debuted in Hollywood, Mr. Oreo accompanied director James Gunn on the red carpet.

Mr. Oreo’s death was publicly announced via a Facebook fan page for Guardians of the Galaxy, who received the information from Mr. Oreo’s humans, who thanked their “wonderful vets for their compassion and care.”

RIP Mr. Oreo.

 

Featured Image Via Twitter