Tag: New York

Desert Books for National Dessert Day

Okay, okay, before you @us, we do know the difference. But what goes better with your favorite dessert than a good book and some mediocre word play? Here are three books to embrace on #nationaldessertday.

 

All the Crooked Saints 

This story follows a family of banished saints, perched high in the Colorado desert where supplicants must travel far for a miracle. These saints can help you, but they can’t save you from yourself, as many pilgrims learn to their dismay. Still, there’s much to be gained by braving the miracles of Bicho Raro. Enthralling, luminuos, and with enough Mexican and Native southern states folklore to keep you from wandering the sand alone at night. At once grim and terribly hopeful, this is an exploration of love, family, and growth, set to pirate radio and the rushing wings of owls.

 

The Golem and the Jinni

New York, magic, the turn of the century – what more could you want? Unlikely friendships? Varied mythology? This book has it all, weaving a lush and surprising tale out of a premise that asks more questions than it answers. A golem and a jinni meet in New York. It’s more likely than you think! I love fantasy being laid over history like velum, especially more modern history. New York, and only a hundred years ago, is not where you most expect to encounter myth, but weaving it in seamlessly can make a world close enough to imagine, both in time and in possibility. goodr

 

The City of Brass 

Street smart and clever, Dara bites off more than she can chew when she summons an ancient and magical creature to her side, soon discovering that she has magic and an ancient legacy drawing her as well. She will have to travel to the city of the djinn itself, where struggles for power, purity, and prestige rage in the streets, if she hopes to find the truth of her past. Opulent, adventurous, and deeply ruted in folklore, this is a must read for anyone who wants a world that breathes with magic, prophecy, and intrigue. If you’re seeking mythology that often gets overlooked, pick this up.

 

The Wrath and the Dawn

I’m always a fan of a clever reimagining, and the tale of Scheherazade was neglected for far too long. You’ve got a lot of classic fairytale beats, like the murder of wives, along with a clever heroine, an unfathomable mystery, and gutting revelations. Scheherazade volunteers herself after her best friend’s murder, intent upon revenge against the cruel monarch who weds and murders so many young girls. But it’s not so simple as it appears, and though Scheherazade makes it to the morning and more, with each dawn she is less certain of her hatred.

Images via GoodReads 

Featured image via ThoughtCo

‘Killing an Evening With Edgar Allan Poe’ Returns to NY City

John Kevin Jones will be returning for the wonderfully titled Killing an Evening With Edgar Allan Poe.

 

Image Via SummonersEnsemble.com

 

Brought to you by the Summoners Ensemble Theatre, in association with the Merchant’s House Museum, this one-man show debuted last year with twenty-seven performances at the landmark 1832 Merchant’s House Museum.

 

John Kevin Jones

Image Via HollywoodSoapBox

 

John Kevin Jones will once again star. It’ll be tough to do this one-man play, even if he has done it twenty-seven times before, he’s a six-year veteran of A Christmas Carol at the Merchant’s House. He’s an expert at this.

 

Dr. Rhonda Dodd

Image Via directory.business.wsu.edu

 

Plus he’ll be joined by the director of A Christmas Carol at the Merchant’s House, Dr. Rhonda Dodd, who will direct this project as well.

 

 

Now that we know we are safe hands, we sit back and let ourselves get swept up in the horror.

 

Exterior-Merchant House Museum

Image Via BrownStoner

 

Like I said before, the play will be performed at the Merchant’s House Museum. This is splendid news and delightfully apropos, given that the Merchant’s House Museum, also known as the Old Merchant’s House as well as the Seabury Tredwell House, is Manhattan’s only 19th century family home to be preserved intact.

 

Edgar A Poe

Image Via Britannica

 

Edgar Allan Poe himself was a nineteenth century writer and literary critic. Born January 19, 1809 and died under strange circumstances in October 7, 1849, Poe became known after his death as the master of horror, mystery, and the macabre, and a pioneer of the short story.

 

Interior-Merchant House Museum

Image Via Timedout

 

The Merchant’s House Museum was formerly the home to the Tredwell’s, a prosperous merchant-class family. Given that the Tredwell’s are now long dead, it’ll only add to the creepiness of the show given that their once lively candlelit parlor will be set for a funeral, complete with coffin and draped mirrors.

Fitting, given that the show features live performances of Poe’s most infamous stories from The Tell-Tale Heart, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Cask of Amontillado, and, of course, The Raven.

 

 

Broadway World warns that “[a] bone-chilling evening of irrational revenge, obsession, premeditated murder, dismemberment, and the very, very dark awaits”.

Buy tickets here, if you dare. The Merchant’s House Museum located at twenty-nine East, Fourth Street in Manhattan, NY. Performances will run September 24th until November 3rd. For more information, please visit www.summonersensemble.org and www.merchantshouse.org.

 

 

Featured Image Via Biography.com

Romance Writers of America Announces the 2019 RITA Award Winners!

Exciting news for fans of literature! The Romance Writers of America (RWA), the trade association that gives out the highest honors for romance fiction. The awards recognize outstanding published romance novels and novellas, with the event itself unfolding at Manhattan on Friday, July 26th at a black tie awards ceremony. Up to 2,000 romance novels and novellas are judged each year by the judges, with the competition being narrowed down to 100 finalists after initial judging. Then, final round judges, also published romance authors, select one winner in each category from among the finalists.

Image via Wikipedia

This year, the RITA Award winners were:

Romance Novella: Bad Blood by M. Malone
Contemporary Romance Long: Long Shot by Kennedy Ryan
Young Adult Romance: My So-Called Bollywood Life by Nisha Sharma
Historical Romance Long: A Wicked Kind of Husband by Mia Vincy
Romantic Suspense: Fearless by Elizabeth Dyer
Paranormal Romance: Dearest Ivie by J. R. Ward
Erotic Romance: Three-Way Split by Elia Winters
Historical Romance Short: A Duke in the Night by Kelly Bowen
Romance with Religious or Spiritual Elements: The Saturday Night Supper Club by Carla Laureano
Contemporary Romance Short: The Bachelor’s Baby Surprise by Teri Wilson
Contemporary Romance Mid-length: Advanced Physical Chemistry by Susannah Nix
Mainstream Fiction with a Central Romance: How to Keep a Secret by Sarah Morgan
Best First Book: Lady in Waiting by Marie Tremayne

Image via Amazon

 

Did any of your favorite romance books make the final cut? Are you excited to add anymore of these award winning books to your collection? Tell us in the comments! And let us know any thoughts you have on the RITA Awards in general.

Featured Image Via Amazon 

 

Bryant Park Reading Room Hosts a ‘Mid-Summer Musts’ Author’s Panel

All summer, Bryant Park Reading Room hosts author’s panels every Wednesday afternoon. This week’s panel was titled ‘Mid-Summer Musts’, and focused on a special set of books that are essential must-haves for your summer reading list. Throughout the panel, the authors were often asked tough questions. 

 

From left to right, Meryl Moss, Basil Hero, Katherine Howe, Justin Kuritzkes, Felicity McLean, Anna Pitoniak | Image Via Jovanna Reyes

 

 

Anna Pitoniak, the author of Necessary People, was asked about the negative relationships that her characters have with one another. In response, Pitoniak described the importance of capturing ‘the true essence’ of real relationships and emulating the toxic relationships that exist in the real world in an effort to help the reader understand them better. Another member of the audience then asked a question about how the setting of the story impacts the characters and the readers. 

 

Image Via Jovanna Reyes

 

Author Felicity McLean quickly responded, as the setting of her book, The Van Apfel Girls Are Gone, is an essential aspect. Since her book is based in Australia, McLean explained that she only intended for her character’s experiences to be relatable to Australians but discovered that readers from all over the world could relate to her characters. 

 

Image Via Jovanna Reyes

 

Katherine Howe, the author of The Daughters of Temperance, added to McLean’s answer and described how important the setting of Salem, Massachusetts is in regards to her characters and their interactions with the environment around them. Later, Howe was asked whether The Daughters of Temperance was a sequel to her first book, and she clearly established that her newly published book is definitely not a sequel, rather it is a ‘stand alone follow up’ to her first novel, The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane; featuring almost all the same characters, though not requiring the reader to have read its predecessor. 

 

 

Image Via Jovanna Reyes

 

Another question was directed at the authors, this time the audience member asked what were the inspiration behind each of the author’s novels. Basil Hero, author of The Mission of a Lifetime: Lessons from the Men Who Went to the Moon, automatically answered and recalled on the strong feelings and the impact that the moon landing made on not only the world-famous astronauts but on the rest of America; this strong feeling is what inspired Hero to write his book. 

 

Image Via Jovanna Reyes

 

Another panelist, Justin Kuritzkes, also explained the inspiration behind his book Famous People. Kuritzkes was interested in how just one aspect of a person can make them drastically stand out from the rest, especially the aspects that the public does not see. 

 

Image Via Jovanna Reyes

 

The panel continued with interesting questions and answers until it ended with all of the authors reading the last line of their books. Although the temperature was reaching the mid-nineties, the panel was very interesting and most importantly shaded from the blazing heat. 

 

More information on the weekly author’s panels can be found on the Bryant Park Reading Room website https://bryantpark.org/programs/Authors.

 

Featured Image Via Jovanna Reyes

Barnes & Noble Will Be Sold to Elliott Management

According to NPRthere is big news in the publishing world for bookseller Barnes & Noble. Eight months ago, Barnes & Noble revealed it was exploring possible avenues for a potential sale. Now, Barnes & Noble revealed in a press release on Friday that it had reached an agreement with Elliott Management and will be sold to the corporation for 683 million. This move will mean Elliott Management will own the largest bookseller in the United States, which unfortunately has been suffering as of late. Much like other physical bookstores, Barnes & Noble is facing stiff competition from online competitors: primarily Amazon, which today dominates the book world. Amazon regularly sells over 50% of books, leaving bookstores such as Barnes & Noble in the dust. For the past several years, Barnes & Noble has seen its revenue slid downward slowly but surely, presenting numerous challenges for Elliott with this newfound sale to the corporate giant.

 

A man walks past Barnes & Noble in New York City

Image via CNN

 

James Daunt will act as the CEO for Barnes & Noble. Recently, he helped British bookstore Waterstones turn its profits around and pull itself from a similar slump to the one Barnes & Noble has found itself in. Elliott’s financial backing, with 34 billion at least in store, should prove a boon for the struggling giant in booksellers. In any case, the deal will be finalized in September, and we’ll see if the deal pays off.

What are your thoughts on this? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

Featured Image Via NPR