Tag: new york city

Explore the Great Outdoors With the Help of Our Nonfiction Wildlife Picks!

Each week, Bookstr gives you a look at some of the best novels in a particular genre for your continued reading list.

Today, we’ll be recommending five of the best wildlife nonfiction books to give your motivation to explore the natural world!

 

 

5. ‘The Animal Dialogues’ by Craig Childs

 

Image via Amazon

 

The Animal Dialogues by Craig Childs is a thrilling book about the author Craig Childs and his various encounters with grizzly bears, sharks, porcupines, elks, bighorn sheep, and many others. Captured with chilling, intimate descriptions and wry humor, this book is a must read for wildlife fans who want to see tons of varied encounters with dozens of different creatures.

 

4. ‘Field Guide to the natural world of New York City’ by Leslie Day

 

Image Via Amazon

 

Field Guide to the Natural World of New York City by Leslie Day showcases the wild world of a place you’d not normally think to look at for diverse wildlife: New York City! The book explores three islands full of different kinds of wildlife at its three rich islands: Manhattan, Long Island, and Staten Island. Written by a real life naturalist, this book sheds light on the real wild side of New York with tips of identifying different animals, plants, and more among the urban sprawl.

 

 

3. ‘Unlikely Friendships’ by Jennifer s. Holland

 

Image via Amazon

 

Unlikely Friendships documents one heartwarming tale after another of animals who, with nothing else in common, bond in the most unexpected ways. A cat and a bird. A mare and a fawn. An elephant and a sheep. A snake and a hamster. The well-documented stories of Koko the gorilla and All Ball the kitten; and the hippo Owen and the tortoise Mzee. And almost inexplicable stories of predators befriending prey—an Indian leopard slips into a village every night to sleep with a calf. A lionness mothers a baby oryx.

Ms. Holland narrates the details and arc of each story, and also offers insights into why—how the young leopard, probably motherless, sought maternal comfort with the calf, and how a baby oryx inspired the same mothering instinct in the lionness. Or, in the story of Kizzy, a nervous retired Greyhound, and Murphy, a red tabby, how cats and dogs actually understand each other’s body language. Your heart will expand at seeing this unlikely friendships come to life.

 

2. ‘Wild Justice’ by Marc Bekoff

 

Image via Amazon

 

Wild Justice by Marc Bekoff tells about the morality animals. Are animals capable of complex emotions such as a understanding of justice?

With this book, the author answers yes and showcases many examples to support their argument: a female Gorilla who mourned the death of her beloved child, a rat who refused to push a lever for food when he saw doing so electrocuted his friend, or a wild elephant who paused to care for a younger one after it was injured. This book shows us that, whether we like it or not, animals are more like us than we think.

 

1. ‘Winter World’ by Bernd Heinrich 

 

Image via Amazon

 

Winter World by Bernd Heinrich is all about how animals survive the harsh winters and the process of hibernation. From flying squirrels to grizzly bears, and from torpid turtles to insects with antifreeze, the animal kingdom relies on some staggering evolutionary innovations to survive winter.

Unlike their human counterparts, who must alter the environment to accommodate physical limitations, animals are adaptable to an amazing range of conditions. Examining everything from food sources in the extremely barren winter land-scape to the chemical composition that allows certain creatures to survive, Heinrich’s Winter World awakens the largely undiscovered mysteries by which nature sustains herself through winter’s harsh, cruel exigencies.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Amazon

2019 Edgar Allen Poe Awards Honors Mystery Writers

Each spring, the Edgar Allen Poe Awards are handed out In New York City. The awards were first started in the 1950s and honor best mystery fiction, nonfiction, theatre, film, and television. The Best Novel went to Down the River unto the Sea by Walter Mosley, Best First Novel went to Bearskin by James A. McLaughlin, Best Paperback Original was If I Die Tonight by Alison Gaylin, Best Fact Crime was Tinderbox: The Untold Story of the Up Stairs Lounge Fire and the Rise of Gay Liberation by Robert W. Fieseler, and Best Critical/Bibliographical went to Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s by Leslie S. Klinger.

 

A picture of a bear standing over a forest with birds flying around it
IMAGE VIA AMAZON

These are some very cool awards with great authors behind them, earning some well earned recognition for their spooky titles! The full list of winners and nominees can be found here. Grab some of them for your continued reading list! And try to find some this year that’ll possibly make the cut for next year’s awards!

 

 

Featured Image Via The Edgars 

Gatsby Was First Published in 1925. So What Else Was Going on?

On April 10th, 1925, Scribner published a short novel by popular author F. Scott Fitzgerald which didn’t sell many copies or receive positive reviews. Today, The Great Gatsby is one of the most widely taught works of fiction in the United States.  Safe to say, the publishing climate in the 1920s was about as unpredictable as international conflict at the time — so what other bookish things were happening in 1925?

 

1. the Argosy Book store opened

 

 

New York City’s oldest independent bookstore, Argosy Book Store, opened for the first time in 1925, although it later moved from 114 East 59th Street to 116 East 59th Street. This famous bookstore still sells rare, used, and new books to customers in its elegant townhouse setting — until 6 p.m. most evenings, anyway.

 

2. American ya author robert cormier was born

 

 

Although he didn’t write his first novel until he was thirty-five , I Am the Cheese and The Chocolate War author Robert Cormier was born on January 17th, 1925, in Massachusetts. His books, later adapted into award-winning films, continues to receive flack today for its violent depictions of mental illness and abuse.

 

3. the new yorker published its first issue

 

The New Yorker magazine, a cultural vanguard for New York City and modern culture, published its first issue on February 21st, 1925 — and has hardly stopped releasing world-famous covers, cartoons, and commentary since then.

 

4. Flannery O’connor died

 

 

On March 25th, approximately a month before the publication of a book that would change the world, literature lost a legend when short-story writer and proponent of the Southern Gothic literary style Flannery O’Connor died from lupus at the age of thirty-nine.

5. T.s. eliot published the hollow men

 

 

20th Century poet T.S. Eliot officially published his haunting tribute to post-war Europe, “The Hollow Men,” on November 23rd, 1925, though there are many borrowed lines from some of Eliot’s previous works.

 

Featured Image Via Argosy Book Store.