Tag: native american

Two Hugo Finalists Trying to Turn Silver to Gold

The Hugo Awards, the annual award for science fiction, will announce their winner later in the week, but for now, there are two finalists which are the first in their series—so you can start reading right now, and be ready for the winner this weekend.

 

Trail of Lightning, by Rebecca Roanhorse

Trail of Lightning

Image Via Amazon

 

Maggie is a post-apocalyptic Navajo monster hunter, and that’s just the beginning. When a girl goes missing in a small town, she’s forced to team up with a medicine man to travel the reservation, uncovering secrets and coming closer and closer to a monster more terrible than either can imagine. An immersive flooded world, filled with gods and monsters, and characters with enough sarcasm and attitude to bear the weight of a dark plot and devastated world.

This has already swept a few awards, and is sure to be a good pick for anyone who likes any supernatural or speculative genres.

 

 

Spinning Silver, by Naomi Novik

Image Via Amazon

 

You may have noticed by now I’m A LITTLE OBSESSED with Naomi Novik, but hey, the experts back me up. This is sort of a fairy tale, related to Rumpelstiltskin, but you always get much more than you can possibly foresee with Novik.

Since her father is running the family business into the ground, Miryim takes matters into her own hands. For better or worse, she’s very good at debt collecting, and ends up catching the attention of the supernatural—the icy Staryk—and it only gets more dire from there. You can expect gloriously lush world building and characters who feel like real people.

 

 

 

Featured image Via Pixels

Meet Joy Harjo, One of the First Native American Poet Laureates!

According to The Guardian there is exciting news for the poetry world. Poet, musician, and author Joy Harjo has been appointed as the Poet Laureate, the first Native American to take the position in years. Harjo has been in the running for a role for a long time, having acted as an advocate and voice for Native Americans in the literary world. Harjo term will last one year, and she will succeed Tracy K. Smith, who served two terms in the position.

 

 

 

 

Harjo is known for poetry collections like The Woman Who Fell From the Sky and In Mad Love and War. Critics have praised her forceful, intimate writing style that draws upon the natural and spiritual world, always emphasizing and exploring man’s relationship to nature.

 

A Native American Woman stands on a lakeshore

Image via Public radio tusla

 

Harjo has expressed her political views through song and metaphor, using her poetry to draw attention to social issues. One of her poems, “Rabbit Is Up to Tricks,” epitomizes her style:

 

And Rabbit had no place to play.
Rabbit’s trick had backfired.
Rabbit tried to call the clay man back,
but when the clay man wouldn’t listen
Rabbit realized he’d made a clay man with no ears.

 

Harjo began writing in 1970, according to The New York Times. As a young woman, she attended Native American gatherings in the Southwest, where she heard poetry spoken aloud. Realizing poetry was a vehicle for social change, her art became a way for her to speak about the Native American rights movement. Since then, Harjo has written eight books in total, including poetry, memoir, and YA novels. As for her nomination, Harjo said she was in a “state of shock” and considers her a position a great honor, as well as a position of honor for all Native peoples.

In a statement to the Library of Congress, Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress said of Joy Harjo’s work “powerfully connects us to the earth and the spiritual world with direct, inventive lyricism that helps us reimagine who we are.”

In addition to being an author, Harjo is also a musician, composing four albums that speak to not only naturalistic themes but also the current political and social divides across America. She feels that poetry is a way to bridge cultures and hopes to embrace her new position.

 

 

 

 

Featured Image Via The Guardian.