Tag: mythology

Two Hugo Finalists Trying to Turn Silver to Gold

The Hugo Awards, the annual award for science fiction, will announce their winner later in the week, but for now, there are two finalists which are the first in their series—so you can start reading right now, and be ready for the winner this weekend.

 

Trail of Lightning, by Rebecca Roanhorse

Trail of Lightning

Image Via Amazon

 

Maggie is a post-apocalyptic Navajo monster hunter, and that’s just the beginning. When a girl goes missing in a small town, she’s forced to team up with a medicine man to travel the reservation, uncovering secrets and coming closer and closer to a monster more terrible than either can imagine. An immersive flooded world, filled with gods and monsters, and characters with enough sarcasm and attitude to bear the weight of a dark plot and devastated world.

This has already swept a few awards, and is sure to be a good pick for anyone who likes any supernatural or speculative genres.

 

 

Spinning Silver, by Naomi Novik

Image Via Amazon

 

You may have noticed by now I’m A LITTLE OBSESSED with Naomi Novik, but hey, the experts back me up. This is sort of a fairy tale, related to Rumpelstiltskin, but you always get much more than you can possibly foresee with Novik.

Since her father is running the family business into the ground, Miryim takes matters into her own hands. For better or worse, she’s very good at debt collecting, and ends up catching the attention of the supernatural—the icy Staryk—and it only gets more dire from there. You can expect gloriously lush world building and characters who feel like real people.

 

 

 

Featured image Via Pixels

Six Galaxy Brain Tweets from SparkNotes

If you’re anything like me, SparkNotes has always been there when you need it. Now, they’re not only helping you pass your classes, but also serving you the spiciest of literature memes. They’re all pure gold, but here are just a few.

 

 

Theseus or not, YOU. ARE. VALID.

 

 

Unfortunately there’s no third option, so if you want to set the Minotaur up on a blind date with your friend, you’re kind of out of luck. Otherwise, you’re good though. What color do your sails need to be if you didn’t slay the Minotaur but you’re seeing it this Friday?

 

 

 

Some people appreciate attitude

 

 

I mean, he’s already in love with her by that point, but you get the idea. He’s always talking about how mean she is, and then boom, marry me! Of course, the same could be said of her. What a stressful ship. Still though, you know, I’m on it.

 

 

 

Want to delay your problems forever?

 

 

Curiosity may not have killed the cat, but it sure killed Dorian Gray. Still, he lived a while looking fresh and evil in stead of old and evil, so if you’ve got the attic space, why not? In this economy though? The thing’s going under the bed.

 

 

 

Do You haunt an old building? Then you need…

 

 

 

Sure, you might not be the most conventionally attractive, but your secret underground hideaway is second to none, and isn’t it what’s on the inside that matters? What’s under the surface? (What’s directly  under the opera house?)

 

 

 

People can’t know we sit! And… murder!

 

 

Maybe not as relatable as the original video, but definitely a strong mood, and just as futile. The body stays right under the floorboards after all. If only there’d been seashells on the doorknobs, maybe things would have gone better.

 

 

 

Hindsight is… Ah man I botched it.

 

 

Don’t look back in anger (or at all). Going to the depths of hell is a nice gesture, and who doesn’t like musicians, but you’ve gotta stick the landing by actually fulfilling the deal. Just one opinion, but if both of you don’t come back alive, that’s a bad date.

 

 

 

All images via SparkNotes

The Charybdis of Literary Meme Culture

Hello internet denizens. Do you Like Homer? Sappho? Memes? Allow me to introduce you to the swirling vortex that is the classics fandom. It may have been two-hundred years since they got any new material, but the community is still going strong. Let’s take a look.

Here, a meme about the greatest intellectual tragedy of all time.

 

Image via TheAmazingPeggyCarter

 

 

But it’s not all about history. Here are some about the Iliad.

 

Image via Classically Classical Classics Memes

 

Alright, so it wasn’t a gift, it was a sacrifice to the gods that the Trojans were foolish enough to steal, but I’m not mad about it. Trojan horse memes may be antique, but they’re classic (heh).

How about another Iliad meme, this time thanks to Parks and Rec.

 

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Image via SymposiumAndChill

 

 

No opinions on the Iliad? No worries! There are general interest memes as well, about things like the Greek gods.

 

 Image via Classically Classical Classics Memes

 

Zeus is a thot. That’s the real takeaway. There’s actually a lot of comedic Zeus hate, which is honestly incredibly valid. Try this one on for size.

 

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Image via PaleoMonarchy

 

Of course, it didn’t work out very well for Prometheus, but at least he got a burn in before being chained… to a rock… and having his liver… repeatedly eaten. Yikes. He’s definitely going to need more than aloe.

 

 

Just one more history meme before I go.

 

Image via JustHistoryStuff

 

March fifteenth may have come and gone somehow, but jokes about stabbing Caesar don’t have to be contained to one date, and next year, when you see this last meme, you’ll know it’s come.

 

Image result for caesar dressing stabbed
Image via Reddit

 

 

Featured image via CLASSICALLY CLASSICAL CLASSICS MEMES

Finest Twitter Flash Fiction to Lighten Up Your Feed

From puppy pics to political news, Twitter is a wonderful place. It’s also home of a wave of flash fiction writers. Here are a few to follow to add some fiction to your feed, even when you don’t have time for short stories.

 

1. T. R. Darling

 

Image via Twitter

 

The absolute best Twitter flash fiction has to offer. Fantasy, mystery, and magical realism combined and intertwined in full stories under two-hundred-eighty words, with a philosophical bend that’ll make you contemplate the combination of genres.

Soon to be a book even.

 

 

2. Mythology Bot

 

Image via Twitter

 

This little bot may not know much, but it certainly has bizarre and whimsical grasp of mythological elements. At the risk of feeling like you’ve thrown a bunch of fantasy books in a blender, follow this bot for some strangeness on your feed.

 

3.The Ghost of M.

 

Image via Twitter

 

Ominous and dare I say emo, this twitter provides story snippets of only a few lines. If you like horror or even just vague unease, follow for these tiny ghost stories.

 

 

4. Ritter Coldriss 

 

Image via Twitter

 

For moody magical realism, look no further. Brief character sketches build strange and unlikely worlds, sci-fi flare, and elegant prose that are sure to have you excited for these stories on your feed.

 

5. King Talib

 

Image via Twitter

Here, moody landscapes combine with strange stories, told one line at a time in a threaded feed. Moody and atmospheric, these stories will leave you questioning their reality and even your own.

 

 

 

Featured image via iStock 

 

Literary Demons

3 Chilling Demons From Mythology That Inspired Fictional Works

For centuries, we have believed in supernatural deities and afflictions caused by malevolent spirits. But these dark beliefs have proven to be more than simple evil; they serve as plot devices in their own ancient histories and sources. And in modern days, we still feature demonic characters both serving the good and bad. Here are the top three demons in mythology that have inspired various works of fiction.

 

 

 

1. Azazel

 

 

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Image Via Nestor Avalos

 

 

Azazel is a very well known name throughout the world. Islam, Christianity, and Judaism all recognize the name in some way, shape, or form. However, the name Azazel is most commonly noted as one of the many fallen angels who followed Lucifer in his downfall.

 

Azazel is noted also as being one of God’s strongest and most intelligent lieutenants in the angelic army. After supposedly being cast out, the demon is referenced in the Dead Sea Scrolls. Azazel was primarily held responsible for teaching man the ways of brutality and warfare. With his influence, the fallen angel supposedly corrupted most of humanity.

 

The name Azazel has been given to a number of characters and works over the years. Both Marvel and DC have characters with the name that exist in their separate universe, and there are various literary works with the title such as the novel series by Boris Akunin or the 2008 novel by Youseff Ziedan.

 

 

 

2. Leviathan

 

 

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Image Via Brian Godawa

 

 

Many people fear the ocean, and we may have this huge bestial force for instilling this fear into us. The Leviathan is mentioned several times in different mythologies and stories of old. Most often, it is depicted as an enormous fish or other huge sea dwelling animal.

 

The Leviathan’s role is seen as somewhat of a rampaging beast, as well as a victory or sacrifice during the end times. It is hinted that when the world will end, the Leviathan will perish and feed humanity. Yeah, that’s how big it’s supposed to be.

 

This huge demonic being has been an inspiration for countless sea monsters in literature, film, and even history. Many sailors wrote about their encounters in strange new seas with unknown, huge monsters that dwell just below the waves. The Leviathan has inspired the likes of the Kraken and features in a multitude of films.

 

 

 

3. Oni

 

 

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Image Via Kappa – The Kappapedia

 

 

The Oni are a class of supernatural spirits of Japanese myth and folklore. As a type of yōkai, these beings are able to accomplish feats that humans can only dream of. Oni are born when corrupt and immoral humans die and are reincarnated in one of the Buddhist Hells.

 

Oni are usually depicted as enormous, hulking ogres that mainly carry around huge clubs as weapons. They are often depicted as antagonistic towards humans and are mainly villainous in their roles in many stories. They terrorize mankind any way possible, and will even resort to eating humans as a form of consumption as well as spite.

 

The Oni have gone on to inspire even more stories about themselves as years have passed. They have been included in many Japanese fairy tales such as Momotaro among others.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via Gizmodo