Tag: movies

We Are Nothing Without Marvel

A world without Marvel is no world at all. With the direction of Stan Lee, MCU has brought the world together through its inclusion of diversity and the ability to insert racial issues. In hindsight, MCU is the reason why comics and science became cool.

Image Via Den of Geek

It’s hard to envision pop culture without the impact of Stan Lee. So much so, that in 2017 parents thought it best to name their newborns after their favorite MCU characters. Some of the most common names are Loki, Pepper, Natasha, Wade, and Parker, which ranks at the top with 1,487 females and 4,386 males. This is no surprise as our friendly neighborhood Spider-Man has been attributed to the beginning of the success of Marvel.

 

Stan Lee and his team went further than inspiring kids with the creation of comics like the Fantastic Four and the iconic X-Men. The Fantastic Four and X-Men heroes, like Professor X, Logan, Jean Grey, Cyclops, and Storm, were the outsiders that allowed fans to compare themselves to characters that resembled their own differences. This didn’t stop here. Black Panther, with the most successful release, provided more representation for black audiences. We hailed Wakanda for months on end, taking on the pride of the Panther Tribe with costumes and more.

And let’s not forget, every hero has a villain.

Image Via Amino Apps

Among these villains are Ultron, the robot created by Dr. Pym in the original Ant-Man; Loki, son of Laufey the king of the Frost Giants; Red Skull, confidant to Adolf Hitler and leader of HYDRA; Ronan, the radical Kree warlord who formed an alliance with Thanos in order to eradicate Xandarians; Thanos, the most evil, bloodthirsty villain who attempted to conquer the universe with the Infinity Gauntlet and many more. These villains, although vicious, are the greatest villains of all time. MCU has made it so that we not only root for the superheroes, but we also give praises to the villains.

 

Even though Marvel films have a variety of characters within different periods of time, they all share an overarching storyline, making Marvel one of the best universes. As Screen Rant’s article puts it, “if audiences had to pick between listening to a lecture on the nuances of particle physics and watching the Hulk smash through Manhattan, they’d probably pick the latter.”

Image Via slashfilm.com

Speaking of audiences, if you ever go to a Marvel movie and you try to walk out at the end, best believe you will get the glaring eyes. There is always a glimpse into what will be coming next, leaving the audiences itching for more.

 

MCU aims to not only entertain the audience but also encourages audience members to reflect on the issues that plague modern society. Many of the issues represented within each comic include “delicate topics like sex, race, drug use, violence, and authority.”

Although Stan Lee won’t show up in the movies anymore, the MCU continues on its legacy by keeping the audiences glued to their seats willing and ready for whatever comes their way.

 

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Feautured Image Via The Verge

Books to Read Before They Become Movies

If you’re a book lover, then your favorite thing to say is probably “Oh, the book was SO much better than the movie!” and we don’t disagree, because it probably was! So before these awesome tales turn into movies in the new year, make sure you snag a few so you can spit out the same line when the adaptations come out!

 

p.s I still love you by jenny han

image via trending news buzz

This is the ever anticipated sequel to the famous YA book and later Netflix film, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before by author Jenny Han, and it will be available to stream on February 12, just two days before Valentines Day! This story is said to focus on Lara Jean’s new relationship with Peter Kavinsky. But this is a high school romance movie, so it’s required to feature a love triangle, and you bet it does!

 

 

dune by frank herbert

Image Via Dread central

Frank Herbert’s sci-fi masterpiece Dune, is getting its long promised screen adaptation since David Lynch took on the challenging task in the ’80s. Arrival director Denis Villeneuve is the perfect fit to adapt the famous book, and the film stars highly notable actors such as Timothee Chalamet as Paul Atreides, alongside Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Jason Momoa, Javier Bardem, and fan favorite Zendaya.

 

 

the invisible man by h.g wells

image via geeky gadgets

The talented Elisabeth Moss stars in the modern adaptation of this classic H.G. Wells novel. This version, a psychological horror film written and directed by Leigh Whannell, is a loose take on the Wells book, as the story focuses on a woman who, after her ex supposedly dies by suicide, thinks she is being hunted by someone invisible. The movie is out on February 28, and we can’t wait for this thrill ride!

 

 

emma by jane austen

image via austenprose

Regardless of how the late Jane Austen might feel, fan-favorite Emma is hitting the theaters on February 21, so all Austen lovers can rejoice! The book was also adapted in 1996 in the Douglas McGrath directed film starring Gwyneth Patlrow, but it’s been 24 years since its release, so it’s time for a remake, right? The new version, directed by Autumn de Wilde, features Anya Taylor-Joy in the lead role as our favorite matchmaker and Bill Nighy stars as Mr. Woodhouse and Johnny Flynn is George Knightley.

 

 

the woman in the window by a.j finn

image via fox

Another great thriller on our list is The Woman In the Window by A.J Finn, coming to theaters in May 15 and starring Amy Adams, directed by Joe Wright. In this film, an agoraphobic woman drinks wine all day and spies on her neighbors. Nothing bad can happen from that, right? And if you’re like us and can’t wait until summer to find out, you could read the book right now – the choice is yours!

 

 

the secret garden by frances hodgson burnett

image via the silver petticoat

This classic tale from 1911 is about to become a feature film for the fourth time, and will be released on April 17, 2020! The film stars Colin Firth and Dixie Egerickx as the child protagonist, and is directed by Marc Munden. If you want, you can read the book, and watch all the adaptations before the latest movie comes to screen!

 

 

the voyages of dr. dolittle by hugh lofting

image via deadline

The second of the Doctor Dolittle novels has finally been adapted into a movie starring Robert Downey Jr. as the eccentric physician who finds out he can talk to animals. The film is simply called Dolittle and stars a number of prolific, diverse actors and comes out January 17, which gives us just about enough time to cram the book to judge if the movie does the famous book justice!

 

If this list doesn’t keep you up at night, I don’t know what will, because we here at Bookstr take film adaptations seriously and like to see for ourselves if the book actually was better than the film, or not!

 

Featured image via Bibliophile

 


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Why It’s Okay To Watch The Adaptation Before Reading The Book

I know, I know. This isn’t a popular opinion. After my list of reasons why people should read The Witcher before watching the Netflix adaptation of the books, it may also be an opinion not readily associated with me. However, I do, personally, believe that it is one hundred percent acceptable for folks to watch or play an adaptation before they read the story that it was based off of.

Why is that?

Well, there are a number of reasons. The first reason is that individuals might not even know that the book exists in the first place. Prior to first watching Howl’s Moving Castle and seeing the note beneath the title card, I had no idea that the Ghibli film was based off of a book–a book written by one of my favorite authors at that! All the same, it isn’t possible for people to keep track of every single adaptation that is released and then track down said adaptation’s literary counterpart.

image via mc crocker books – wordpress

I believe that any adaptation worth its salt will encourage individuals to then actively seek out the book to further immerse themselves in the world that they saw on the silver screen. When I learned that Howl’s Moving Castle was based off of a book, I went out and got the book and its sequel. I then proceeded to read through the book three times. I would literally finish the story and then flip back to the first page and start all over again. So, for me, I think that an adaptation can advertise the book, and in doing so, more people can seek out that story and enjoy it. Granted, the story and the film might be drastically different, but those differences might make it so that the story and the adaptation can then be viewed as entities that are unique in their own way.

but also Consider the people who struggle to read

image via readbrightly

These individuals might have dyslexia. They might have a hard time sitting still long enough to read a story. There might be some neurological elements that come into play here that make it exceedingly difficult to absorb the narrative without completely blocking out everything else. Sometimes, a film adaptation is the remedy to this situation.

There are also individuals who have difficulty finding the time or energy to read long stories. If one works a particularly taxing job, reading might not be their ideal pastime because of the focus it requires. Perhaps the only time a person has to devote to recreational reading occurs when they’re sitting in a waiting room or when their children are asleep.

 

For these individuals, an adaptation can certainly solve a number of problems. Consuming a television show or a movie doesn’t take as much time as reading a book can. Movies, more often than not, don’t usually exceed two hours; television shows range anywhere from a half hour to an hour per episode. So if an individual has a particularly restrictive schedule, they can take into account the run time of an adaptation and plan accordingly. Whereas with a book, there is more of a time commitment involved–which isn’t a bad thing. It’s just something that needs to be taken into account.

And… some people have had really bad experiences with reading

image via treehugger

I’m going to ask you, dear reader, to let me finish this point before passing judgement. I have always been an avid reader. When school and life were difficult, I would go hide in a book. It was my escape, and it was my refuge. So for me, I didn’t truly understand why some individuals that I encountered didn’t like to read.

But then I asked them.

One of my relatives told me that the reason he stopped reading after high school was because he hated the required reading that he was made to read for his literature classes. It didn’t help that he was forced to read some extremely heavy books with a short window of time. For him, it was the pressure, and he ended up feeling burnt out and disinterested from that point onward. If he watched an adaptation, then he was able to enjoy the story without experiencing the same pressure he felt while he was in school.

 

A lot of my classmates in my English program echoed this idea of burn out too. Given that several of our classes would require us to read one book a week, and then we would have to dig into the book, analyze, and answer questions on various topics related to the narrative, quite a few English majors began to hate reading outside of course work. This problem was only worsened if you had a course load where you had three or five classes that were all literature focused. Those classes would often carry the same expectation that you were reading one book a week, so that would sometimes result in an English major reading up to three to five books every week. The last thing a lot of us would want to do after reading two hundred or more pages a night for class was go and read for pleasure. This wasn’t the case for everyone, but quite a few of my classmates would opt to read for fun over breaks, and during the semester, film adaptations were ideal. It was a lot easier to sit down for two hours and watch a movie, knowing that it wouldn’t occupy the entire night. After finishing an adapted film or an episode, we could go back to studying or, even better, sleep.

So it’s okay to watch the adaptation first

image via hero machine

While I did encourage readers in my past article to read The Witcher series before watching the Netflix adaptation, I did so with the concern that many fans would judge the Netflix series based upon the decisions made in the video game… which is another adaptation and isn’t technically considered canon to the book series that Sapkowski published. To give one example: I have seen several articles written by authors that are upset at the fact that Yennefer and Ciri have more pronounced roles in the Netflix adaptation than they do in the games. Their experiences within the plot are explored, and that has upset quite a few game fans. Fans of the books know that these two characters do have ample time spent in the narrative from their points of view. So part of me feared that knee jerk reaction of a new fan of the story writing off the entire adaptation without giving it a chance because, of an article that expressed an opinion more driven by the writer’s experiences with the games.

 

While I don’t view this article as a correction of my first one, because I do stand by what I wrote, I do want to emphasize to my readers that everyone’s situation is different. We need to recognize the limitations that are imposed on others by their lives and their health.

We also need to recognize that a good adaptation should attract readers to a book series, and even if someone decides to never read the story it’s based off of, that’s okay. At the end of the day, what is important is that there are individuals who enjoy an incarnation of a story that means something to a lot of people.

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Featured Image Via Bookish

Four books stacked on top of each other (left side) beside an open book

Laugh out Loud with These 5 Insane Places to Read!

You can read anywhere. You can read in your house, on the bus, in a train, on a plane, you can read with the sunset behind you or with a sword fight in front of you.

 

Two people staring at each other through their respective books

Image Via NPR

 

But, using high tech sciencey things, we now know for sure, beyond any reasonable doubt, that these are the top five definite worst places to read.

 

5-In a burning building

 

Firefighters trying to put out a burning building

Image Via Practical Eschatology

 

The building is on fire. Well, time for a good book!

Don’t be that dude. The flames will destroy the pages and it’ll be too hot to properly read. You’ll get light headed. You will burn alive.

 

A book burning

Image Via The Guardian

 

And worst case, the book will burn into ash, and books shouldn’t be burned.

 

4-On Train Tracks

 

Don’t do this.

 

A POV shot of someone lying on traintracks

Image Via Time Magazine

 

There are two problems with this. For one, if you sit down normally then you could be sitting in a dark tunnel. Not good if you want to see what you’re reading without the assistance of a flashlight.

 

The subway arrives

Image Via Aliexpress

 

But let’s say the tunnel is lit up, like the picture above, or you’re outside, like the picture above that. Well, either way you’re sitting down on a terrain meant for a train that wasn’t meant for you to sit on. Sounds like your bum could be in a lot of pain. And if you lie down, that could hurt your spin. Not good.

ALSO A TRAIN COULD SMASH INTO YOUR FACE!

Picture this: You’re reading a good book. Completely engrossed. Eyes on the book, you don’t see that light coming for you at the end of the tunnel. But you hear it. You try to stand up, but you fall. It’s not so bad, you think, that could be something good. But here’s the thing…

 

Ben Affleck as Daredevil
Image Via Decider

“THAT’S NOT HEAVEN, THAT’S THE C TRAIN!”

And now instead of reading, you got hit by a train. Now that just sounds like a pain in the neck…

 

 

3-In the ocean

 

A person swimming (drowning?) in the ocean
Image Via Video Blocks

 

You’re underwater with a good book. Pacific ocean, let’s say? Yes, let’s say that.

The ocean is sparkling, glittering. Above you, colorful fish swim around you, dancing about like angels. You look down, but guess what? You can’t read. The water has washed the pages and smeared the ink.

 

Someone reaching above the surface of the water, straining to reach an unseen helping hand

Image Via Tony Evans

 

Now you have nothing to read while you drown. Life sucks sometimes, don’t it?

 

2-Space

 

Space

Image Via Wired

 

This seems romantic. Hurdling through the cosmos, a book in your hands, flying with the cosmos to the stars beyond the stars. Your eyes go to that first line and-

 

Even Starload nearly died in space...and he's half Celestial

Image Via Guardians of the Galaxy

 

You’re dead now. Wanna know why? Because you can’t breathe in space.

 

 

1-Skydiving

 

Skydiving

Image Via Skydive Mossel Bay

 

So you have your favorite book with you, but then a strange man in a red costume tells you to get ready. You put your trust bookmark in (don’t dogtail the page, you monster) and you put it at your side. There’s a parachute on your back. The plane opens up. You’re about to go skydiving.

With the wind whipping your face, you look below and see the ground. It looks like a painting. You take a breath and fall.

 

Skydiving

This is you, but you have a book in your hand  / Image Via Skydive Oz

 

As you tumble to the ground, you realize this might not ever happen again. You could die. Your blood is drumming through your veins. Your heart is going fast. With adrenaline pumping through you, you could just speed through the lines. When are you going to get another opportunity like this?

You open up your book and start to read. You’re reading fast, so fast, and you read both pages at breakneck speed. You flip the page, but you’re fighting against the wind. This is going to be harder than you think.

With all your might, you flip the page and readjust your hand, but the wind is too much. Not only is the wind literally shredding pages out of the book, but it feels like it could tear the skin off your hand.

The book flies out of your hand. That book cost a lot of money and you need to finish it before you give it back to mother earth. You look to where it’s gone, and you maneuver your body after it.

 

Skydiving

Image Via Fatherly

 

The light is harsh against your eyes. You squint, reaching out. But, Ghosh, what is that light? It’s yellow and it’s orange and it’s-!

 

A burning building, with leaping flames and billowing clouds of smoke.

Image Via Dissolve

 

A burning building. You can manage this. Reaching down, you grab the book. Yes, you have the book, and you will make this work. See that burning building? What a perfect place to read, you think, having not read this list.

 

Parachuting
Image Via BBC

You pull the parachute and gently glide into the burning building. But guess what?

 

A book burning

Image Via The Guardian

 

The book will burn into ash, and books shouldn’t be burned.

 

 

 

Featured Image Via INC


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5 Uncursed Howl’s Moving Castle Memes

This is the point where I confess that Howl’s Moving Castle is my favorite Miyazaki movie by far. They’re all good! But I connect with Sophie on a deeper level. If you’ve yet to read the book, get ready to have the experience of the movie turned up to eleven. Sure, it’s not as soft or as serious, but believe me when I say you will not miss it. Obviously the movie is iconic, but the book characters are on a whole other level. Thanks for coming to my ted talk. Here are some memes.

 

That’s Growth

Image via Pinterest

Who doesn’t want to be very very old? Sure, hypothetically the curse is a punishment, but Sophie clearly finds it as liberating as I would. Meek little Sophie Hatter starts breaking into magic houses and bullying demons. Talk about a glow up. In the book, Howl tries to lift Sophie’s curse, but her own magic keeps it in place. It really goes to show they’re a good match. She’s ridiculously stubborn and he’s just ridiculous. Still, we stan, and I think we can all relate.

 

It’s What he Does

Image via DeviantArt

This might be the hottest take I’ve ever seen. Of course he bites her hair. It looks like stardust! And what does Howl do to stars? Eats them. You’d think he’d learn his lesson. Unless you’ve seen the movie, read the book, or heard about literally any of his choices. Learn his lesson? This is a man who literally will not stop ghosting immensely powerful witches and then running away. The mistakes are endless. She looks surprised here, but I don’t think anything can surprise Sophie anymore.

 

It’s a Different Vibe

Image via WhiteSmilingBeauty

I’m not going to get all ‘the book was better’ on you because I absolutely adore both, but book Sophie is an honest to god force of nature. When she gets mad she kills an entire garden. It’s sort of the spiritual opposite of Howl’s slime meltdown, I guess, because it’s productive, but still absolutely ridiculous. Just talk about your feelings instead of throwing dramatic magic everywhere! You guys are too powerful to be this messy.

 

Metamorphosis

Image via Pinterest

Sure, education is important, but at what cost? What is it about just going to class that ages me fifty years? I can’t be alone. Maybe it’s the fluorescents, maybe it’s learning, maybe it’s the fact that I’m too lazy to wear my glasses at home, but there’s a sharp contrast. I don’t even need a witch to curse me. Just tell me I have sixty pages to read in two days and I wither like the witch of the waste trying to climb the stairs. Stay strong, and don’t use school mirrors.

 

Slime Icon

Image via Rebloggy

True story, every day for about a month I walked past a closed popup, but it’s banner was still outside and described it as ‘a slime experience’. Who would want that? Howl, apparently. I’ve had some hair dye gone wrong, and I’ve been dumped, but never have I flooded my entire living room and half of Porthaven. He just hired Sophie, she just got everything clean, and now he pulls this? Still, it’s one of the most memorable scenes, and characterizes Howl pretty powerfully without any explanation needed.

Featured image via Ameno Apps