Tag: most popular books

YA Books

5 YA Romance Books If You Have a Crush on ‘To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before’

My goodness how I love a good YA romance; they’re like my guilty pleasure. Except I don’t feel guilty; I love ‘em and I don’t care who knows it. From when I was a younger to now, YA novels have always had a way of stealing my heart and making everything much sweeter. They make you feel starry-eyed and remind you of what it’s like to fall in love with life and someone else.
 

 

'To All the Boys I've Loved Before'

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Naturally, I was very happy to hear that Netflix was releasing an adaptation of Jenny Han’s well known YA romance novel To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before. What a treat! If you’ve already read the book, you’re set. And even if you haven’t read it, we’ve got the list for you. Here are five books to check out if you’ve got a crush on To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before.

 

 
 

 

YA Books

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A fifteen-year-old Ruby Oliver has a shrink for all the hardships she’s been through for the past few days. From losing her friends to becoming an outcast to having her first beer. She finds her way through each challenge by listing it all out. We think she’ll be okay, but not without a few more funny faults and heartaches.

 

 
 
2. Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson

 

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Emily has always been the quiet one; she’s the one to stay within the safe confines of her comfort zone. Then Sloane comes along and yanks her right out of it. But right as their wild summer is about to begin, Sloane just disappears. Emily is left by herself again… along with a big list of to-do’s from Sloane. Will she have the guts to do all these without someone by her side? Will it lead her to Sloane? With the help of a cute guy she’s never seen before Emily lives life like she never has before.

 

 
3. 99 Days by Katie Cotugno

 

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Could you imagine spending the 99 days of summer at home before college with the boy whose heart you broke and the boy you broke it for? Awkward. Now imagine them being brothers. That’s rough. Molly Barlow has to live with the pain of hurting not just her ex, but his whole family. Their sister is mad, the town remembers, and Molly just wants to avoid everyone. But when memories resurface, mistakes are forgiven, and feelings are hard to fight, summer can start to feel a lot longer.

 

 

 

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To know every single thought that your crush has, every fantasy, and all those unspoken words would be pretty unreal. When Gideon surprisingly lands himself in one of New England’s most esteemed prep schools, his head is barely keeping above water. His roommates are totally cool, but lack the character that Gideon has. He soon finds himself faced with an initiation to lose his virginity to the sexy Molly, but his plan could change. He can’t help but want to win over Pilar, the most beautiful girl he’s ever seen. Everyone is confused, except for the one girl that can read his every thought.

 

 
 
5. Love, Rosie by Cecelia Ahern

 

YA Rosie

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From the beginning, Rosie and Alex were meant to be together. At least that’s what they thought until Alex and his family moved from Dublin to Boston. The two try their best to stay in touch with emails and phone calls, but eventually, time and life pull them in different directions. However, destiny has a different plan for them. Throughout the novel, we catch all the miss opportunities and how one moment can change everything.
 

 

 

 

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Books Set in Italy

5 Books My Trip to Italy Inspired Me to Read

It was only a couple of days ago that I arrived back from an amazing three week trip in one of the most beautiful countries in the world. It lasted for twenty-one days, but on the first day I stepped off the plane I was in love. The rolling hills dotted with Cypress trees, the crowds of effortlessly attractive people, and the food made with such care and love. I was in awe that a place like this could exist and I hadn’t seen it with my own eyes! But of course, the book nerd in me needed to take it a bit further.

 

I’ve been inspired by all that was around me and now I’m on the hunt for a good book to cure my post-holiday blues. Preferably, one set in Italy. Here are five books that might be my next read and maybe yours too.

 

 

 

1. Call Me by Your Name by Andre Aciman

 

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We’ve reported on it, we love it, and we can’t get enough of it. Call Me By Your Name follows the slow blossoming then rapid romance between a teen and the University student who stays at his family’s summer home in Italy. The two young men are overcome with feelings and desire with no regard for the consequences of their love. A true love story.

 

 

 

2. The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim

 

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Here we have four different women,yearning to escape the rain and clouds of London and  make it to the warm, golden sun of the Italian coast. Together they decide to book a trip to live in a medieval Castle right in the heart of the Mediterranean. For the few weeks they’re there changes, romance, and life lessons occur in the warmth of springtime. For a story of rediscovery, this is it.
 
 
3. My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante

 

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In the 1950s in a poor village on the outskirts of Naples, two best friends are trying to live through post-war Italy. They begin life in their beautiful village with their families, then the novel follows them over the span of 60 years. From love, to marriage, to becoming wives and mothers, these two women remain true to their winding paths and strong friendship.

 

 

4. The Birth of Venus: A Novel by Sarah Dunant
 

 

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Alessandra Cecchi is only fifteen-years-old when her prosperous merchant father brings a young painter in their home to design their palazzo walls in Florence. With the young man’s talent, spirit, and mind, she begins to fall in love, overcome with his abilities. However, her hopes are shattered when her father arranges for her to marry a much older and wealthier man. With the turbulence of a city divided with art, religion, and violence, her love is is not always easy. But her feelings for both men grow as she attempts to understand the passionate love for the young artist. Love, art, and history in Florence are the central focus.

 

 

 

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A sweet true story whose movie I love so much, this journey has everything you could want. Frances Mayes, a published poet and travel writer as well as gourmet cook, decided to take a leap in her life one day. After flying to the breathtaking Tuscany to purchase the abandoned Bramasole villa, we follow her story of fixing it up and rebuilding her own life someplace new. From the recipes inside to the push to change your life, Mayes’s story is sure to inspire anyone who reads it.

 

 

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10 Books George R.R. Martin Highly Recommends

Fantasy author George R.R. Martin revealed his top 10 book recommendations to  The New York Public Library as part of the #ReadingIsLit campaign which encourages readers to visit their local libraries.

 

The Game of Thrones author was asked which five books he would recommend to fans of Game of Thrones and served up some iconic and lesser known (yet just as thrilling) stories he’d highly recommend. No surprise, The Lord of the Rings topped the list twice, but for fans of genres outside of fantasy, he also offered up his all-time favorite books which— on top of Tolkien’s iconic fantasy series – included four modern/contemporary favorites. Check these out!

 

Top 5 Fantasy Books:

 

1. The Lord of the Rings | J.R.R. Tolkien

 

2. Watership Down | Richard Adams

 

3. The Once and Future King | T.H. White

 

4. Lord of Light  | Roger Zelazny

 

5. A Wizard of Earthsea | Ursula K. LeGuin

 

 

Top 5 All-Time Favorite Books:

 

1. The Lord of the Rings | J.R.R. Tolkien

 

2. The Great Gatsby | F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

3. The Prince of Tides | Pat Conroy

 

4. Catch-22 | Joseph Heller

 

5. A Tale of Two Cities | Charles Dickens

 

 

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Via Giphy

 

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4 Fake Memoirs That Fooled The World

Memoirs have always been quite a fascinating literary genre because the true personal accounts can have such a profound impact on our view of ourselves, others, and the world. Reading true tales, from Holocaust survivors who persevered through family separation and starvation to successful men and women who overcame social disadvantages and accomplished their dreams, memoirs can inspire readers tremendously. But what if those awe-inspiring tales were partially (or completely) false? While fabricating something so profound seems so unethical no one would dare do it, you’d be surprised.

 

Here are 4 popular memoirs that turned out to be fake!

 

1. Fragments: Memories of a Wartime Childhood by Binjamin Wilkomirski

 

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Binjamin Wilkomirski’s harrowing and detailed account of his childhood spent in a concentration camp garnered critical acclaim and earned him several awards, including the National Jewish Book Award. As it turned out, it was all a hoax. Not only was Wilkomirski never in a concentration camp, but his name was a pseudonym and he was not, in fact, polish at all. Known as Bruno Doessekker, the author was born to Swiss parents and grew up in an affluent neighborhood far from the wretched conditions described in his book. The vivid details described created a debate amongst the public. Wilkomirski himself argued that any inaccuracies on page could be explained because the book was written after recovering his memories (which went undiscovered for years due to PTSD). While the some Holocaust survivors have stood by the author, many survivors, researchers, and psychologists have largely discredited his book. 

 

2. Go Ask Alice by Anonymous (Beatrice Sparks)

 

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Go Ask Alice has been one of the most influential YA books since its release in 1971 as its first-hand accounts of teenage drug use, sexuality, and typical teenage angst struck a chord with young readers everywhere. Though it was initially marketed as a diary written by an anonymous teenage girl who later died of a drug overdose, controversy arose when the author was later revealed to be Mormon youth counselor Beatrice Sparks, who was one, an adult and two, very much alive. Sparks allegedly wrote the book as a cautionary tale to young readers and while she faced backlash for her deception and the content of the book itself has made it one of the most banned books, her book has nonetheless remained a YA staple. 

 

3. A Million Little Pieces by James Frey

 

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James Frey’s emotional account of his issues with alcoholism and drug abuse was so addictive even Oprah Winfrey advertised it by selecting it for her book club. Soon after, The Smoking Gun published an article discrediting the accuracy of Frey’s book, alleging that many details were fabricated. Though Frey’s publishing company initially supported their author, they eventually began offering customers refunds. Though Frey admitted that he altered “small details,” he claimed his overall battle with addiction was truthful. Frey was eventually dropped by his literary agent, lost a publishing deal with Riverhead, and was critically lauded by Oprah Winfrey in a live confrontation. Frey’s second memoir, My Friend Leonard, a sequel to A Million Little Pieces, was also proven to be a fake memoir.

 

4. Love and Consequences: A Memoir of Hope and Survival by Margaret B. Jones

 

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Love and Consequences struck audiences as a heartwarming tale of a young interracial girl’s troubled life growing up in foster care, situated in a gang-ridden south-central L.A. neighborhood. This critically-acclaimed tale of perseverance and racial identity was swept into a firestorm of controversy when the author was revealed to be an educated white woman who had grown up in an affluent neighborhood and was nothing like she claimed to be. The author, whose real name is Margaret “Peggy” Seltzer, had used the second-hand experiences of the youth, whom she met while working to prevent hang violence in L.A., and may have gotten away with it had her sister not recognized her in an article about the book. Needless to say, the book’s publishers pulled it from shelves and offered refunds to customers who had bought it. Seltzer responded by saying that she simply wanted to use her opportunity to “put a voice to people who people don’t listen to.” 

 

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Quiz: Can You Identify A Book Based on a Single Page?

Typically, avid readers tend to identify books and authors relatively easy. The works of distinquished authors tend to have a unified aura; even if their stories are not connected, the storylines, tone, and characters can have a shared something or other. These books, however, can be a wee bit difficult to identify without a name or author. Challenge yourself to see which books these images originate from!

 

 

 

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